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Find Your Dream Job Podcast by Mac Prichard

Find Your Dream Job Podcast

by Mac Prichard

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Description

Find Your Dream Job is a podcast for professionals who are looking for new work, meaningful employment, and an opportunity to make a difference in life. Listen to the podcast to learn how to: enter the labor force, jumpstart a stalled career, compete in a crowded job market, write a better resume, ace a job interview, uncover the hidden job market, improve your networking, use social media to find a job, work with a recruitment agency, discover location-independent jobs, write a killer cover letter, find a new profession, negotiate a salary raise, start a DIY career, become a digital nomad, find government jobs, get work in the nonprofit sector, succeed in business, start a new career, transition to a new job, strengthen your professional brand, find freelance gigs, join the sharing economy, connect with a recruiter, move up the corporate ladder, conduct an informational interview, explore remote work opportunities, improve your work/life balance, navigate employment applications, move into a new industry, land a nonprofit job, build your portfolio, showcase your job skills, optimize your LinkedIn profile, become self-employed, make professional contacts, become a contractor or consultant, avoid unemployment, make more money, love your job, and make a difference in the world. Hosted by Mac Prichard, Ben Forstag, and Jenna Forstrom. Intro and exit music by Freddy Trujillo. Mac's List is an online community in Portland, Oregon, connecting job seekers with rewarding work since 2001. On Mac's List you will find more than 400 jobs, internships, volunteer and event listings each week, as well as a blog, podcast and other resources with actionable advice on finding meaningful work. Learn more about Mac’s List and Find Your Dream Job at http://www.macslist.org.


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Ep. 084: Why Women Don't Ask For More Money, with Ashley Milne-Tyte


Wed, Apr 26, 2017


Studies show that many women don’t negotiate for salary as often as men during the hiring process. Guest expert Ashley Milne-Tyte says women leave money on the table all the time. Salary gaps between men and women often start at the beginning of their careers, because young men are more inclined to negotiate their salary, while women tend to accept the company’s initial offer.

Cultural conditioning and stereotypes are at the center of this problem. Talking about money can be very uncomfortable for many women, whether it’s due to lack of education about finances or fear that they’ll come off as greedy or “bossy.” Hiring managers, both men or women, may consider women  pushy or rude while the same behavior from men is seen as normal.

However, there are various studies that show women negotiate very well when they are negotiating for someone else. So how can women take those skills and go to bat for their own benefit? Ashley recommends a book that has become her “negotiation bible: it’s called Ask For It, by Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever. It can change a woman’s view when it comes to negotiating.

Techniques to help women ask for and get more:

  • Do your research. Find out what people in similar positions are making, pulling both national and local salary ranges.
  • Be calm and understand expectations. Know going in that you may get different reactions. Be calm, firm, yet friendly in your ask.
  • Don’t accept the first offer. It’s common practice to take a day to consider an offer. Use that time to come up with a reasonable counter-ask.
  • Have options in your ask. Whether you offer flexibility in payment schedule or other compensation instead of cash, be open but don’t roll over.

Women leave money on the table all the time. By understanding bias, doing your homework, and presenting a well-informed ask, women can negotiate for better compensation.

This Week’s Guest: Ashley Milne-Tyte

Ashley Milne-Tyte is a podcast host and radio and print reporter based in New

York. She has reported extensively for Marketplace, the public radio business

show, as well as local stations and smaller shows. Ashley teaches at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. Her podcast on women and the workplace, The Broad Experience, has been featured on best podcast lists in

The Guardian, Fortune, and Entrepreneur.

Ashley will focus on conservative women in the workplace, and Executive Assistants, on her upcoming podcasts.

This Week’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is an article from Inc. entitled Why You Should Tell Your Coworkers How Much Money You Make. The article tackles the touchy subject of discussing salaries in the workplace, and considers salary transparency as a tool for  uncovering unfair wage gaps.

This Week’s Listener Question:

This week, Kristin Schuchman, career coach at A Portland Career, joined the Mac’s List team as a fill-in guest host. Kristin, Ben, and Mac answer Samantha Marshall’s question:

“I've been working at my job for several years, and they have told me several

times that they would pay for me to go to grad school, but when I bring it up,

they push back or say they have to consider it. I really want to go to grad school, but I can't afford to do it on my own so this would be a really great opportunity — but I'm worried it will strain my work relationship if I keep asking. How can I advocate for myself and for this opportunity, while maintaining a good relationship with my managers?"

Stay up-to-date with the Find Your Dream Job podcast. Here’s how:

  • Get an answer to your job-related question on the air! Email your question to jessica@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.
  • Share a job resource you think everyone should know about. Email ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

If you like this show, please rate and review our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 083: How to Rebuild Your Confidence After a Layoff, with Jane Jackson


Wed, Apr 19, 2017


Losing your job—under any circumstances—is a painful, embarrassing experience, and it’s natural to be upset. You may feel like you’ve lost control of your life, or that you’ll never find another job.  Plus there’s the stress of managing your financial responsibilities on a diminished income.

While it’s natural to be anxious after a layoff, you shouldn’t let panic drive you to rash decisions. So say this week’s guest, Jane Jackson. Instead, give yourself time to heal and figure out the next step in your career.

Jane suggests that you reach out to trusted friends and professional contacts to help you avoid catastrophic thinking and maintain perspective. These people can help clarify where you are where you are in life and what options are available.

Only after you’ve properly dealt with the emotional aspect of a job loss, should you create a plan to find your next gig. If you jump too quickly into the job search process, you’re likely to come across as desperate or needy to potential employers—a dynamic that will only lead to more frustration on your part.

This Week's Guest: Jane Jackson

Jane JacksonJane Jackson is a career and life coach who has worked with thousands of clients across Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Europe. She is the author of the Amazon #1 bestseller, Navigating Career Crossroads: How to Thrive when Changing Direction. Jane also hosts the Your Career Podcast.

Jane is excited to be speaking about branding and networking, at an upcoming CFO conference in Cannes. And, she recently launched the online career transition program, The 7 Steps Careers Program.

This Week's Resource

Ben’s resource this week is the blog post, After Being Fired, Answer the Job Interview Question: Why Did You Leave Your Job? from Job-Hunt.org, The post recommends starting with a positive statement and then explain the circumstances around your being fired in an honest, flattering light and then pivot to a positive takeaway from the experience.

Listener Question of the Week

Joining the Mac’s List team as a guest-host is Andrea Gerson, Portland-based career coach and principal at Resume Scripter. Andrea, Ben, and Mac answer Jasmine Ward’s question: "Should I send a cover letter even when the employer doesn’t specifically request one in the job posting?"

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: How Women Can Make a Successful Return to the Workplace, with Farai Chideya


Mon, Apr 17, 2017


Women are much more likely than men to leave the workforce to raise children or assist elderly family members. Unfortunately, after a prolonged time off, it’s not easy to on-ramp back into full employment. There simply is not much infrastructure to help women step back into the workforce. That’s why it’s so important to be prepared before you take your hiatus.

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Farai Chideya, author of The Episodic Career: How to Thrive and Work in the Age of Disruption, explains what women should to before they take time off to lay the foundation for their eventual return to the workforce. 

Her suggestions include:

  • Document all the work you have done. You're less likely to remember everything if you wait until you're ready to return to work.
  • Sit down with your current supervisor and ask them to itemize your accomplishments and highlight your skill sets.
  • Ask for the document to be added to your personal file and keep a copy for yourself.
  • Call upon your current network to let them know you are taking time off and you plan on returning.

You can find more useful job search insight in Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, now available on Amazon. To preview the first chapter for free, visit www.macslist.org/anywhere.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 082: Deadly Networking Mistakes, with Abby Kohut


Wed, Apr 12, 2017


We say it a lot here at Mac’s List: networking is the single best thing you can do for your job search—or your career, in general. But attending a single networking event probably isn’t going to land you a job right away. Networking is about building mutually-beneficial, long-term relationships, not making awkward demands for a job.

In fact, according to this week’s guest, Abby Kohl, the single biggest mistake you can make in a networking event is to ask for a job. Another fatal error is beginning a conversation by announcing your unemployment. Both actions are deadly mistakes for the same reason: they make networking all about you and your needs. Such an approach is more likely to scare people away than to lead to a constructive conversation.

Instead, Abby recommends that you always focus on how you can help the person you’re talking to. Listen to their ideas, try to identify their challenges, and ask how you can help. This positions you as a solution provider—the kind of employer every organization wants. It also builds goodwill with your contact, increasing the likelihood that they will assist you in your job search.

Abby’s other networking tips include:

  • When you’ve made a good connection, ask for a follow-up meeting over lunch or coffee.
  • Find a “job search buddy” who is looking for similar work.
  • Always have business cards available.
  • Never say you’re unemployed. Instead, say that you are “between successes.”

This Week's Guest: Abby Kohut

Abby Kohut, founder of Absolutely Abby, is a recruiter who has filled more than 10,000 jobs. Through her website, books, and talks Abby shares hiring secrets other recruiters won’t tell you. Abby is on a mission to help one million job seekers. She is now driving across the United States on a nationwide tour to accomplish the goal.

If you have a job search group, contact Abby on her website to create an event in your town. Meet Abby offers a free teleseminar, “Interviewing Ingenuity.”

This Week’s Job Search Resource

Ben’s resource this week is from the PBS segment, "How to Make a Personal Connection with an Employer Even if the Job Listing Forbids It," by headhunter, Nick Corcodilos. Most job postings explicitly say ‘no calls please.’ Nick recommends finding an alternative way to contact the hiring manager and discussing their problems in a constructive manner.

This Week’s Listener Question

Joining the Mac's List team as a guest-host is Andrea Gerson, Portland-based career coach and principal at Resume Scripter.  Andrea, Ben, and Mac offer advice to listener Megan Smith, who wants to know which format she should use for her resume.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 081: Break the Rules To Get the Job You Deserve, with ?Liz Ryan


Wed, Apr 05, 2017


The traditional hiring process is broken and everyone knows it--both job seekers and hiring managers. The over-automated, keyword-driven, impersonal way most organizations hire is a relic of software systems built 40+ years ago. As such, playing by the rules is more likely to land you a stress headache than a job offer.

This week's guest, Liz Ryan, offers a ray of hope, with strategies and techniques that will help you rise above the rest when reaching out to employers. She encourages job seekers to break the rules of the system. Instead, she urges people to proactively reach out to the organizations where they most want to work--and where they can create the most value.

In practice, this means:

  • Ignore the formal hiring process.
  • Decide where you want to work, and have an idea of how they can help the company.
  • Use LinkedIn’s advanced search to find the person who would be your boss if they were to get the job they wanted.
  • Send a pain letter to that person at their place of employment.

A pain letter is a letter that focuses on your contact's specific challenges and highlights how you can help with these problems. The first sentence should be the hook to pique the person’s interest. Include a story which highlights the pain or problem the manager may be experiencing, and end the letter with a soft and respectful, “I’d be happy to start a phone or email conversation with you.”

This Week's Guest: Liz Ryan

Liz Ryan is the founder and CEO of Human Workplace, a think tank and publishing firm whose mission is to reinvent work for people. Liz is the author of Reinvention Roadmap: Break the Rules to Get the Job You Want and the Career You Want. She writes for Forbes.com, LinkedIn, and other publications. Liz is a highly sought-after keynote speaker who has hired over 10,000 people.

Liz’s work in 2017 includes empowering workers and reinventing corporate work environments in an effort to move them away from a mechanical mode and back into a human mode.

Resource of the Week

Ben’s resource this week is a blog post from Allison Green titled, Gimmicks Won’t Get You a Job. Allison has an entire page of zany and outlandish things people have done to try and land a job. Favorites include a spouse who advertised her job-hunting spouse on a billboard and a person who sent a framed picture of themselves to a hiring manager.

Listener Question of the Week

Jessica, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Nicole Wilson, who wants to know guidelines for using unlimited paid-time-off (PTO) offered by some employers.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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The 20-Minute Networking Meeting, with Nathan Perez


Mon, Apr 03, 2017


Often, when busy professionals receive a request for a networking meeting, time is the deciding factor as to whether or not they accept it. If you want to improve your chances of meeting an important contact, make it clear that you only want twenty minutes of his or her time.

In this bonus podcast episode, Nathan Perez, executive career and job search coach, as well as co-author of the 20-Minute Networking Meeting, shares his advice on how to organize and execute a short, focused informational interview. 

Here are his key tips:

  • Have a focused agenda prepared in advance.
  • Give your contact context about your professional background. 
  • Ask a short set of targeted and strategic questions.
  • Know the background of the person you're meeting with and understand how they can help you with your job search.
  • Listen and stay actively engaged in the conversation.

Preparation and focus allow you to have an informative and powerful conversation. If you master the art of the 20-minute networking meeting you will quickly build a network that will advance your job search.

You can find more useful job search insight in Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, now available on Amazon. To preview the first chapter for free, visit www.macslist.org/anywhere.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 080: How Volunteering Can Help You Get a Job, with Mark Anthony Dyson


Wed, Mar 29, 2017


Volunteering is an important component to any job search, and can benefit the job seeker in myriad ways. So says this week's guest, Mark Anthony Dyson. While most volunteer gigs won't lead to a formal job offer, Mark argues that giving your time and energy as a volunteer helps you stand out from the crowded field of job seekers.

Here some of the many benefits to volunteer service:

  • It's a great way to network within an industry or an organization you want to work for.
  • It shows value-alignment between you, your peers, and target organizations.
  • It allows you to showcase your professional skills or learn new skills
  • It give you a chance to help others, who may, in turn, be able to help you
  • It can fill in employment gaps in your resume.
  • It can make you feel better about yourself and your job search.

This Week's Guest: Mark Anthony Dyson

Mark Anthony Dyson is a career consultant who helps unemployed, underemployed, and under-appreciated job seekers. Mark’s advice has appeared in U.S. News & World Report, Monster, Fox Business and TIME magazine. He’s also the founder of the award-winning career blog and podcast, The Voice of Job Seekers.

This Week's Job Search Resource

Ben’s resource this week is the website VolunteerMatch. It matches volunteers with organizations in search of volunteers and vice versa. The are thousands of volunteer opportunities in a hundred different cities and even virtual volunteer positions.

This Week's Listener Question

Jessica, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Mary Anne Rice who wants to know if she should be her authentic self in a job interview.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 079: How to Choose a Second Act Career, with Nancy Collamer


Wed, Mar 22, 2017


Many people believe retirement means working until a certain age and then enjoying a life of leisure. The problem with this thinking, says this week's guest expert, Nancy Collamer, is that most of us are facing the 40/30 dilemma. After working (only) 40 years in a full-time career, 30 years of retirement can be too many hours to fill, and too many years to fund.

That's why Nancy urges people to make retirement more than just gardening, grandkids, and golfing. You can also use this time to explore a second act career.  A part-time job to supplement our income, or a volunteer position may be just what the doctor ordered.

A Second Act Career

A second act career is the work we do after our primary careers. In general, the work is more fun, more flexible, and more fulfilling than our previous work. Nancy notes that many people find it daunting to plan for their second act career, so she suggests three steps to help with the process:

  1. Introspection —  Think about what you want, and how you want to do it.
  2. Idea Generation — Get out there, and research your options.
  3. Experimentation — Try things out, to see what fits.

The sooner you start this process, the better! Finding your encore career earlier in life, may allow you to quit you unfulfilling 9-5 job before you otherwise expected. A second act career can also mean you don’t have to dip into your savings as early. You can delay accessing your Social Security, and that is a financial gain.

Bucket or Chuck It?

Nancy recommends planning for your retirement hours with a bucket list and a chuck it list. A bucket list is a way to make sure you get in everything you’ve ever wanted in life, while a chuck it list allows you to say goodbye to those things you never really liked, such as traffic and spreadsheets.

This Week's Guest: Nancy Collamer

Nancy Collamer is an expert on second-act careers, semi-retirement and boomer career trends. She writes a career blog for Forbes.com and the PBS website NextAvenue.org. Nancy is also the author of Second-Act Careers: 50+ Ways to Profit Your Passions During Semi-Retirement and a contributor to Not Your Mother's Retirement and 65 Things To Do When You Retire.

Nancy publishes her free newsletter on My Lifestyle Career and she is working on a digital product to help people jump start their second act career planning process.

 

Resource of the Week

Ben’s resource this week is the Huffington Post — Reinvention Section. This entire section is for those lucky people who are 50+ are interested in reinventing their life, career or location. There are some great articles here and some not so great, so browse around.

Listener Question of the Week

Jessica, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Ryan Wilson who is looking for guidance about to talk about himself and his accomplishments, without coming off as boastful.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: Ageism is Alive and Well, But You Can Fight It


Mon, Mar 20, 2017


It is against the law for employers to discriminate based on age. Yet, ageism is an undeniable truth in the modern workforce.

In this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Kerry Hannon,  author of Love Your Job: The New Rules of Career Happiness, shares her tips on how you can overcome age bias when looking for a new job.

Employers can be skeptical about hiring older workers because they worry:

  • You don’t have the stamina for the job.
  • You may not be up to speed or willing to learn new technology.
  • Your salary demands may be too high and your health benefits cost more.
  • You won’t be able to answer to or take direction from younger bosses.

To fight back against this perception, Kerry suggests the following:

  • Don't get stuck in the past
  • Get a career coach
  • Don't get caught up on salary
  • Study up on technology
  • Use social media
  • Focus on networking
  • Volunteer
  • Join (or create) a job-hunting group
  • Do your homework
  • Believe in yourself

You can find more useful job search insight in Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, now available on Amazon. To preview the first chapter for free, visit www.macslist.org/anywhere.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 078: How to Explain What You Do for a Living


Wed, Mar 15, 2017


"What do you do for a living?" It's a question you probably get often, especially when meeting new people. What you say matters a lot, says this week's guest expert, Christina Canters. Your answer may lead to your next job or it can help you move up in your career.

Because the question is so common, however, most people don’t give it much thought. They simply spit out their title and then stop. Christina says a title doesn’t give the other person anything to respond to. A better answer to "what do you do" can be a starting point to a more engaging conversation.

Christina offers these tips when sharing what you do:

  1. When speaking with people outside your field, explain your job in language and metaphors that are easily understandable.
  2. Explain who you help in your job--and how you might be able to help the person you're speaking with.
  3. Add a fun fact about your work just after your title.

If you're currently unemployed and looking for work, use the "what do you do" question as an opportunity. Put a positive spin on your situation by saying “I’m looking for new opportunities at the moment. I’m looking to help or do…”

Christina also emphasizes the importance of confidence when explaining your job.  If you don’t come across as confident in yourself, why would anyone else be confident in you?

Her tips for projecting confidence include:

  • Get into a positive state-of-mind before you arrive at an event or presentation.
  • Do power poses to put yourself in a positive physical state.
  • Watch your language and remove the words “just a” before your title.

This Weeks Guest: Christina Canters

Christina Canters is a communication skills speaker, coach and host of the podcast, Stand Out, Get Noticed. Her website, the CMethod, helps ambitious professionals become more effective and confident when they speak, present and pitch. An engaging speaker, Christina has wowed audiences at organizations and conferences around the world with her passion, humor, and the occasional ukulele song.

Resource of the Week

Ben’s resource this week is the blog post Why Are Job Titles Important to Your Career? from The Balance. Titles are an important part of the compensation management system. The article includes common job titles and descriptions of what the job title includes.

Listener Question of the Week

Jessica, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Abbey Pendley who is looking for guidance about mentioning ongoing freelance work to a possible new full-time employer?

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 077: Do You Know These LinkedIn Secrets? with ?Meg Guiseppi


Wed, Mar 08, 2017


Build it and forget is not a good strategy for your LinkedIn page, especially if you are job hunting. Job seekers need a strong, robust presence to demonstrate their capabilities, and communicate what makes them stand out above other candidates. If your profile is not updated, it may appear you are out of touch with the new world of work.

Tips for Writing Your LinkedIn Content

  • Provide the information your intended reader will be looking for.
  • Make it as easy as possible for employers to know what you need them to know about you.
  • Blend your soft skills with your hard skills to tell a good story about yourself.
  • Use your personality to differentiate yourself and communicate what you have to offer.

This week’s guest expert, Meg Guiseppi says making use of the Awards section and other rarely utilized sections can elevate your profile by way of Search Engine Optimization (SEO). Completing these sections gives you more content, more searchable keywords, and it passively promotes you.

Meg advises users to post on LinkedIn’s Pulse Publishing Platform. Writing posts and sharing them, can benefit a job seeker by demonstrating their areas of expertise and thought leadership. If you are a person of interest, hiring managers may search for your name, and interesting posts will make you a more viable job candidate.

This Week's Guest: Meg Guiseppi

Meg Guiseppi is the CEO of Executive Career Brand. She helps C-suite and senior-level managers with executive job searches. Meg is the Personal Branding Expert at Job-Hunt.org and is the author of several books, including 23 Ways You Sabotage Your Executive Job Search and How Your Brand Will Help You Land.

Resource of the Week:

Ben’s resource this week is from Portland’s own Tripwire. The article, "A Guide on 5 Common LinkedIn Scams", helps prepare you for the dark underbelly of America’s most popular professional networking site. It’s worth your time to review this article because no one wants to be the person falling for a Nigerian Prince who just wants to get them a job.

Listener Question of the Week

Jessica, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Kellie Goodman who recently graduated with a Master’s Degree and wants to know what tips the team has to help her land her first gig.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice
 
If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

 



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BONUS: Your Uniqueness, Your Threads, with Aubrie De Clerck


Mon, Mar 06, 2017


The most important—and most difficult—part of any job search is finding focus. You need to have some idea of what you actually want to do in your career. Without a focused job search goal, it’s almost impossible to sell yourself to potential employers.

Aubrie De Clerck, of Coaching for Clarity, says the best way to find focus is to explore your natural gifts. In this bonus episode, Aubrie reads her contribution to our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, in which she explains how you can identify your “better than the rest” qualities.

You can find more useful job search insight in Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, now available on Amazon. To preview the first chapter for free, visit www.macslist.org/anywhere.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

 



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Ep. 076: The Best Job Interview Question Ever, with Jeff Altman


Wed, Mar 01, 2017


Job interviews can be dry and intimidating. They normally have a set format in which the interviewer and interviewee go back and forth, over and over. But it doesn't need to be this way.

Our guest this week, Jeff Altman, suggests that job seekers have the power to turn any interview into a dynamic conversation between equals. He believes you can do this by asking one question as soon as you begin the conversation. The question is simple: "Tell me about the job as you see it, and what I can do to help?"

This question is a game-changer because it sets you up with all the information you need for the rest of the interview--specifically, what the hiring manager sees as the biggest challenge for the organization. Plus, you level the playing field with the interviewer and set yourself apart from the competition.

Jeff discusses how to interpret the hiring manager's reaction to this question, and other workplace dynamics you can infer from how he or she responds to your prompt.

This Week's Guest: Jeff Altman

Jeff Altman, known as The Big Game Hunter, has helped organizations find leaders, employees, and consultants since 1971. In this role, he’s evaluated almost 700,000 people and filled more than 1,200 positions. Jeff also publishes the No B.S. Coaching Advice newsletter to help job hunters, HR professionals, and business owners make better staffing decisions. And, he’s the author of eight books about job hunting and the host of the Job Search Radio podcast.

Jeff’s site, Job Search Coaching HQ, is a great resource where Jeff helps people find work more quickly.

Resource of the Week

Ben’s resource this week was written by the nicest member of the Mac’s List team, Ben Forstag, and is titled: "The Questions You Should Be Asking at Your Next Interview".

Listener Question of the Week

Jenna, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Kristen Pfeiffer who is looking for guidance on applying for a job if the salary listed is too low or isn’t included
in the posting.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 075: How to Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stand Out, with Marc Miller


Wed, Feb 22, 2017


LinkedIn is the dominant social media platform for professional networking, and employers have taken notice. Nearly 80% of recruiters use LinkedIn to find candidates.  They are searching for specific skills and when they find the right fit, they won't hesitate to reach out--even if the person isn't actively looking for work.

If you've never been contacted by an employer on LinkedIn, you might not be using the right job titles and keywords in your profile. This week's guest expert, Marc Miller, argues that you've got to optimize your LinkedIn profile to make it easy for employers to find you. He explains how to use keywords in your job title, summary and headline that an employer would use is key.

Marc shares how to use tools like Tag Cloud or Wordle to identify the keywords that most resonate with prospective employers. Then he identifies explains exactly where to use these keywords in your LinkedIn profile.

His most important point: take advantage of all the available space in your 120-character headline and the 180-character job title. These are the most searched fields on LinkedIn. If you're leaving white space in those areas, you're missing a huge opportunity!

This Week's Guest: Marc Miller

Marc Miller has worked at IBM, taught high school math, and had a near fatal bicycle accident that changed his perspective forever. Marc credits his varied career with teaching him a vital lesson: Most people don’t know what makes them happy. Marc now helps others — especially Baby Boomers — find careers that they can grow into for the decades that lie ahead on Career Pivot.

Marc’s updated Repurpose Your Career book is available for pre-order on March 15, 2017, and his Repurpose Your Career Podcast episodes are released every Monday.

Resource of the Week

Ben’s resource this week is the article titled, "LinkedIn Profile: First Person or Third Person?" There is no empirical data on which is the correct version, but the Mac’s List team, and many people on LinkedIn, prefer the use of first person on the social media platform.

Listener Question of the Week

Jenna, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Gregory Rouse who is looking for guidance on how to talk about being fired.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: Three Secrets to Success with Human Resources, with Melissa Anzman


Mon, Feb 20, 2017


"To apply, contact Human Resources."  These words are enough to induce a groan from many job seekers.

For many people "HR" is an impermeable, mysterious gatekeeper, standing between them and the job of their dreams.  But sometimes you simply can't avoid working through a human resources department--especially in larger, most formal companies. And, if you play your cards right and get HR on your side, you have a strong advocate within the organization.

In this bonus episode, Melissa Anzman, CEO of Launch Your Job, shares her contribution to Land Your Dream Job Anywhere. She takes a scientific approach to working with HR and her advice will help you move along in the hiring process.

Here are Melissa's three keys to success:

  1. A personal value proposition - Know what value you bring to the table and put your best marketing and showcasing efforts forward.
  2. Networking and outreach - The HR person needs to be interested enough in you to want to meet you in person.
  3. Understanding your audience - Your conversations with HR should be high-level in nature and save the nitty, gritty details for later. 

You can find more useful job search insight in our new book Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, now available on Amazon. To preview the first chapter for free, visit www.macslist.org/anywhere.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 074: How to Answer the “Desired Salary” Question, with Jim Hopkinson


Wed, Feb 15, 2017


Have you ever had a prospective employer ask about your desired salary? Or inquire about your salary history? Companies ask these questions to weed out applicants and (sometimes) get the upper-hand in pay negotiations.

This week’s guest, Jim Hopkinson, argues that your response to salary questions can be the difference in whether or not you get an offer and how much leverage you have in future pay discussions.

The employer does not necessarily hold all the cards when it comes to negotiating salaries. Jim recommends finding out all the facts about the job before you even start discussing salary. You may find there are job responsibilities which warrant a higher pay scale. And if you are the right fit for the job, you can enter the salary discussion knowing you have something of exceptional value to the company.

Here are Jim’s recommendations if you are required to enter your desired salary in an application:

  1. Respond with a phrase like “negotiable,” or, “To be discussed during interview.”
  2. Try adding a nonsense number like “$0” or “$1,000,000” to show you are purposely not answering the question.
  3. If the system doesn’t allow a nonsense number use a numerical range.

If you are unsure which salary range you fall into, Jim says there are five different ways to research how much you are worth:

  1. Go to salary sites. (Glassdoor.com, Payscale.com, etc.)
  2. Look at industry salary guides. (Robert Hath)
  3. Go to job sites and search your title.
  4. Internal networking with people you know.
  5. External networking with people you don’t know.

Pro Tip — Job seekers should be spending 4 out of 5 days at job fairs and other face-to-face networking events.

This Week's Guest: Jim Hopkinson

Through his Salary Tutor website, Jim Hopkinson teaches people how to negotiate their salaries, and get paid what they are worth. He’s the author of Salary Tutor: Learn The Salary Negotiation Secrets No One Ever Taught You, and the co-author of How To Quit Your Job - The Right Way: A 5-Step Plan To Ditching Your Day Job. His free introductory course, The Negotiation Mindset, is available on his website.

Resource of the Week

Ben’s resource this week is a blog post, How to Respond to Salary History Requests, from the U.S. News and World Report Careers Blog by Alison Green. He also shares a related news story from the New York Times entitled Illegal in Massachusetts: Asking Your Salary in a Job Interview.

Listener Question of the Week

Jenna, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Jeff Croxford, who asks: “What current platforms and skills would be transferrable to most IT careers?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about email it to ben@macslist.org or call at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 073: What People with Interesting Careers Have in Common, with Srinivas Rao


Wed, Feb 08, 2017


What do you want to be when you grow up? It's OK if you are still unable to answer this question, argues guest expert, Srinivas Rao. There's always time to change paths and find a more personally rewarding career that resonates with your passions.

Most people try to create a linear career path; each new job is a stepping stone to ever increasing levels of responsibility. This thinking is driven by the chase for money and the expectations of others. But the real problem is that a linear career doesn't always lead to interesting jobs. Our interests change as we age, so we need to create opportunities to explore new directions in work.

Choosing a job you enjoy allows you to thrive. You may get paid less, but you will be more productive, engaged, and happy.

Of course, money is an always an issue. When planning a career, consider what jobs may increase your long-term earning potential, even at the expense of short-term salary. If you are a recent college graduate or have been let go from a position, use the time to evaluate what matters to you and prepare yourself for the job you want. As Srinivas says “sometimes it takes a disruption to initiate change.”

If it feels like you are being herded in a particular direction to go along with the crowd, get a decent-paying job and settle in, it’s because you are. Social norms often dictate what people with normal jobs do. To find a compelling interesting career, you need to break the mold and focus on your own personal passions and interests.

This Week's Guest: Srinivas Rao

Srinivas Rao is the host and founder of The Unmistakable Creative podcast where he’s interviewed more than 600 thought leaders and people from all walks of life.  He’s also written multiple books including the Wall Street Journal bestseller The Art of Being Unmistakable.

Srinivas is currently working on his second book, which is about the creative habits and the creative process. He says, “it will be a map of how to create in a distraction-driven world.”

Resource of the Week

Ben’s resource this week is the article "The 21 Most Valuable Career Skills Now" put together by Money Magazine and Payscale.com. The authoritative list includes which skills generate the highest increase in pay. They found employers willing to pay more for the ability to make sense of big data, the ability to manage the bottom line, the ability to leverage new technology and strategic thinking skills.

Listener Question of the Week

Jenna, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Anne-Marie Sheridan, who asks: “How do you know if a company reaching out to you on LinkedIn is a scam?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS - Use Analysis To Turn Paralysis Into Action, with Hallie Crawford


Mon, Feb 06, 2017


In this bonus episode, certified career coach Hallie Crawford reads her contribution to our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, the complete Mac's List guide to finding work you love. 

Hallie urges all job seekers to start their search with some deep personal analysis. This begins by building a "Career Contrast List" to figure out their true career wants. This helps in two ways:

  1. People realize there may not be as many barriers to their career path as they initially thought.
  2. It helps job seekers become more rational and practical about what they need to do next.

Next, she has people construct an ideal model for their career. This means:

  1. Exploring career values and enjoyments of job seekers. 
  2. Confirming (and sometimes attaining) the qualifications needed for the dream job they are considering. 

The goal of these exercises are to complete a comprehensive analysis the job seeker can use to take action in their job search.

You can find more useful job search insight in our new book Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, now available on Amazon. To preview the first chapter for free, visit www.macslist.org/anywhere.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 072: How To Get The Most Out Of Your First Job, with David Mariano


Wed, Feb 01, 2017


This episode is about explicitly about first jobs, but the lessons we share can apply to just about any job, no matter how established you are as professional.

The average worker will have 8-11 jobs over the course of their lifetime. Each position can (and should) be a stepping-stone to a bigger, better opportunity in the future. But to make this happen, you need to do more than just show up and collect a paycheck… you need to network!

Our guest expert, David Mariano, recommends building relationships within your company, both inside and outside of your immediate job environment. These connections will benefit you immediately with additional understandings of how the piece parts of your organization work together; they will also prove beneficial to your future endeavors.

Getting to know people in various positions is a tried and true networking technique. Today’s middle manager could be tomorrow’s VP. If you consistently treat people the way you want to be treated, you will gain influence. Also, asking for help and asking a lot of questions can lead to great insights. You will find people are willing to help if you have an honest motive.

It is advisable in today’s work environment to find a mentor. Look for someone with the character you want to have when you reach a level you want to someday attain. It may be someone outside your current organization. To further your business acumen, listen to podcasts and read leadership books.

Pro Tip — Many companies have groups or clubs during non-work hours, find an event you can attend.

David Mariano Bio

David Mariano is the founder of Finance Career Launch, a career development site that includes a podcast, course, and other resources. He is also a director with Western Reserve Partners, a middle market investment bank. In his career, David has worked with company owners, CEOs, and CFOs, as an advisor, part-owner, or executive.

Sign up for a free 7-part video course, The Seven Pillars of a Successful Career in Finance. The content includes skills, habits, and mindsets found in the most successful people.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is from Adweek. The post entitled "6 Common Mistakes Recent Graduates Make and How to Avoid Them," by Molly Folse is applicable to any worker at any age. Failing to negotiate, impatience about paying dues, gossiping or griping to fit in are common mistakes. Check it out to see if you have made any or all of the blunders, and how you can avoid the mistakes you haven’t made yet.

Jenna’s Listener Question:

Jenna, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Taireez Niswander, who asks today’s Listener Question, “What are the skills and knowledge necessary to know to prepare me for future employment?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 071: Questions to Ask Before You Apply for a Job, with Amanda Augustine


Wed, Jan 25, 2017


Successful job searches require time and effort. Spending time customizing job applications, targeting a job search, and a goal-oriented personal brand, will help job seekers find success more quickly, says career advice expert, Amanda Augustine. She advises job seekers to pick one goal for their job search, and then make sure all materials they create reflect that goal.

In today’s world, a professional resume is not enough. Job seekers also need to have an online presence that tells a consistent story. 90% of employers research job applicants online before deciding to interview them. This means social media accounts should have the proper privacy settings and your LinkedIn profile should closely match your job search goal. You are selling the most important thing you will ever sell in your life, which is your experience and your talents.

Even if you are considering a short-term job to pay the bills, look for the jobs that make the most sense for your long-term goals. If you are overqualified or underqualified for a job, but have reasons for pursuing it, utilize a cover letter to explain your reasons. Amanda suggests leveraging your network. A Career Crossroads study found job seekers are 10 times more likely to get a position, when an application is accompanied by a referral from an employee.

Mix these 3 methods of job searches for best results:

  • Online job listings.
  • Leverage a personal and professional network.
  • Outreach to recruiters.

Applications and resumes will more than likely go through a piece of electronic software known as an applicant tracking system. The systems are designed to screen and rank resumes before sending them to the recruiter or hiring manager. If your resume is not formatted to make it through the system, a human may never read it.  Do online research to make sure you include the right keywords to pass the initial gatekeeper system.

Pro Tip — Make sure the must-haves of a job description match your qualifications closely.

Amanda Augustine Bio

Amanda Augustine is the career advice expert for TopResume. She gives job search and career guidance to professionals who want better careers, and to find the right job, sooner.  Amanda blogs regularly about career advancement on the TopResume website and also contributes to The Huffington Post. Her blog post, 7 Important Questions Every Job Seeker Should Ask Themselves inspired today’s podcast episode.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is Cold Turkey. Cold Turkey is commitment based software that blocks websites you use as diversions, such as Facebook or other social media. The program includes a timer and once you set the timer you are unable to access the websites you submitted for up to 8 hours. Job seekers can use this to block notifications from job list websites that send out hourly notifications.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Jenna, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Thomas Ewing, who asks today’s Listener Question, “Should a recent college graduate go directly to graduate school or get job experience first?”

Listen to this podcast resource for additional information on the topic:

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice. Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). The book offers practical, actionable, and proven tools to help you get clear about your career goals, find hidden jobs, ace your next interview, and more. Join the pre-publication list and get the first chapter of this useful resource free.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

Tweetables:

“Find the right job, sooner with the Mac’s List Land Your Dream Job Anywhere book.”

The sooner you have a targeted job search, the sooner you will get a specific type of job.”

“Your job search is a sales job, and the product you are selling is you."



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Bonus Episode: Social Media... Friend or Foe?


Mon, Jan 23, 2017


In this bonus episode, the Mac’s List team reacts to a recent New York Times opinion piece, Quit Social Media. Your Career May Depend on It, written by Cal Newport.

Mr. Newport, who acknowledges that he's never had a social media account, argues that tools like Facebook and LinkedIn can hurt your career. He bases his argument on three general ideas.

  1. Interesting opportunities and useful connections are not scarce. Therefore, social media is not needed to find them.
  2. Social media is not harmless--it takes time and energy away from other things you should be doing 
  3. Social media is a passive approach to professional advancement

Mac, Ben, and Jenna, respond to each of these points and try to find some practical guidelines for optimizing your use of social media. 

If you found this analysis interesting, share your thoughts with the Mac’s List team on our Facebook page. Then, sign up to get the first chapter of Land Your Dream Job Anywhere for free and early bird access to the entire book on its launch date, February 1st.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 070: How Women Can Get Great Tech Jobs, with Allison Esposito


Wed, Jan 18, 2017


Contrary to popular belief, women don’t need to be coders or programmers, to get a great job in the tech industry, says guest expert, Allison Esposito. The tech industry is full of sales, marketing, and engineering positions that need to be filled. Even if a woman has never worked in the tech industry, she has transferable skills that apply to tech jobs.

Breaking into the tech field can be difficult because big tech companies have so many competitive applicants. It can be hard for a person to stand out, especially if they don’t have any experience in the tech field. Allison suggests women apply to smaller startups, to gain experience and to build their resumes.

The gender gap in the tech world is quite large. It can be seen in small startups, all the way up to big companies. Big companies report a ‘Pipeline Problem,’ which means they don’t believe women are out in the job market, or that their skill level is not up to par with the men applying for the same positions. Allison doesn’t believe it’s a pipeline problem, she thinks it is a connection problem.

To see where you might fit in the tech world, consider what you are already doing, and see where your skills fit. To make the switch to a career in tech:

  • Make sure you are using the product or service of the company you wish to work for.
  • Jot down what you would do differently if you worked for the company.
  • Join online groups, and follow people who have the type of jobs you want.
  • Absorb as much as you can in the media and at meetups.

Women can often be intimidated to attend IT meetups because they don’t feel they fit the traditional mold of young, male IT employees. Allison says if you go to a networking event with small goals and low expectations it will be less intimidating.

Pro Tip — Make a list of the companies you want to work for, and start building your network within those companies.

Allison Esposito Bio

Allison Esposito is the founder of Tech Ladies, a community that connects women with the best jobs in technology, and companies with the best women tech makers. Allison is also a branding and marketing expert, who has worked for Google, Foursquare, and other tech firms.

In 2017, Allison will be gearing up her product roadmap and event calendar for ever-evolving Tech Ladies Community.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is the blog post, Top 8 Signs an Employer is Family Friendly. Ben consistently receives questions from parents about how to find out if a company is family friendly before they apply for a position. This article is loaded with tips, including look for a company with a high percentage of female executives and female employees.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Jenna, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Mindy Hoffman, who asks today’s Listener Question, “How to ask for a raise without seeming pushy, yet maintain your assertiveness?” The Mac’s List team recommends Ramit Sethi’s Ultimate Guide to Asking for a Raise and Negotiating Salary, the podcast episode with Jeff Weiss, 3 Steps to Take in Any Job Negotiation and the Josh Doody episode, How to Get Your Next Raise.If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice. Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). The book offers practical, actionable, and proven tools to help you get clear about your career goals, find hidden jobs, ace your next interview and more. Join the pre-publication list and get the first chapter of this useful resource free.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

Tweetables:

“Get the first chapter of the Mac’s List Land Your Dream Job Anywhere book free.”

“You don’t have to code or be a programmer, to get a job in the tech field.”

“‘Salary negotiation,’ and ‘wing it,’ are two phrases, which should never be linked together.”



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Ep. 069: How to Craft a Killer Elevator Pitch, with Jeff Kleid


Wed, Jan 11, 2017


When you are looking for your dream job everyone always says, “You need to go to a networking event!”

This is great advice. But it's not enough simply to show up at an event and hang out at the hors d'oeuvres table. To make the most of a networking event—and really kickstart your job search—you've got to use this opportunities to meet and connect with fellow professionals. 

It can be difficult to make these connections, especially in a crowded room where it can seem like everyone already knows each other.

One tool that can help you break the ice and quickly connect with others is a killer elevator pitch.

If you don’t have an elevator pitch—or even know what one is—then this podcast is for you!

A focused elevator pitch is essential for a job seeker who wants to leave the best impression of themselves in the shortest amount of time, says this week's guest expert, Jeff Kleid. Jeff argues that a good elevator pitch gives you have the best shot at positioning yourself for a job.

The basic elements of good elevator pitch are:

  • Telling the other person who you are.
  • Telling the other person what you do.
  • Telling the other person what you have to offer.

People stand out if they have a connection with the job they are seeking. And, leading with an anecdote or a true story about the type of person you are helps to position you for the job you want.

In less than 60 seconds you should relay:

  • What you do — "I’m a …"
  • Who you are — "My name is …"
  • What you are able to accomplish — "I like working …"
  • Make it memorable — "Like the time I …"

To feel confident when delivering your elevator pitch, Jeff recommends three things, Practice, practice, and practice.

  • Practice in front of a mirror.
  • Practice with other people.
  • Practice your pitch in front of an objective person.

Most importantly, be authentic! Wear your transparent and open; honesty is the best policy.

Pro Tip
 
Be sure your pitch works for different audiences.
 
This Week's Guest
Jeff Kleid is a motivational speaker who delivers workshops and online training classes that teach businesses how to engage, connect, and grow. He is also the author of the book, Networking with the Cards You Are Dealt.
 
Resource of the Week
Ben’s resource this week is "30 Brilliant Networking Conversation Starters". This blog post from the Muse can really help you if you are nervous at networking events, but want to make the most of your time. Ben, Mac, and Jenna share their favorites.
 
Listener Question of the Week
This week's question comes from Jacob Arnold, who asks: “I am changing careers. What are some potential red flags I should avoid on my resume or in interviews?”
 
Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like the show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. I appreciate your support!
 
Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo.


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Bonus Episode: Finance Career Launch


Mon, Jan 09, 2017


Mac Prichard, Founder of Mac’s List and co-host of Find Your Dream Job Podcast was a featured guest expert on Episode #91 of the Finance Career Launch podcast, How to Use Informational Interviews and Networking to Find the Best Jobs Because They Aren’t Posted Anywhere with Dave Mariano. In this podcast, you learn from real finance professionals and other Subject Matter Experts as they discuss Do’s, Don’ts and everything you need to get ahead.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 068: The 3 Biggest Obstacles to Your Dream Career, Anna Runyan


Wed, Jan 04, 2017


Do you have a clear vision of where you want to go with your career? If not, you may be wasting precious time, as tasks related to job searches can become overwhelming. Today’s guest expert, Anna Runyan, says there are three main obstacles for job seekers searching for their dream job. They are:

  • Time:
    • Consider what job searching tasks can be batched to save time.
    • Plan out priorities on a calendar.
    • Put extra effort into networking.
  • Fear:
    • Job seekers may fear of applying for jobs they don’t think they are qualified for.
    • Job seekers should surround themselves with supportive network groups such as Facebook, Masterminds, and industry forums.
    • Job Seekers need to get over the fear of networking with people they don’t know.
  • Direction:
    • Figure out your ideal career fit.
      • i. Look at your previous career experiences.
      • ii. Make a list of things you love doing, and things you do not want to do.
    • Determine your ideal work day, and then map it out.

Pro Tip — Informational interviews with people already working in the field you want to work in, can help you determine the next steps of your job search.

Anna Runyan Bio

Anna Runyan is the founder of Classy Career Girl, named by Forbes as one of the 35 most influential career sites of 2014.  She helps women design and launch their dream careers, businesses, and lives. Previously, Anna worked for Booz Allen Hamilton and was a professor of management at DeVry University.

Anna is excited to be working on her new membership site, Love Your Career Formula.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is the Harvard Business Review. It reads as an academic business journal but has a cornucopia of interesting and useful articles. You can read up to four articles a day without a subscription. There is a lot of valuable organizational management information on this site.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Jenna, Ben, and Mac offer advice to Julie Williams, who asks today’s Listener Question, “What is appropriate attire to wear to an interview in the Pacific Northwest?”

Julie attended the Career Change Communications networking event put on by Mac’s List and the Oregon School of Journalism.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017) or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice.

Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). The book offers practical, actionable, and proven tools to help you get clear about your career goals, find hidden jobs, ace your next interview and more.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 067: Why Your Resume is Being Ignored, with Pete Mockaitis


Wed, Dec 28, 2016


Have you sent out 50 resumes, only to get 50 emails from automated system replies? If so, your resume might not have what it takes to get the attention of the hiring manager.

Pete Mockaitis says the main reason resumes are ignored is because job seekers don’t put in the proper time, effort, or consideration into these vital documents. Often, people send out the same resume for each job opportunity. To truly enhance your resume, Pete says you need to spend the necessary time to hone your story message, to match exactly what a potential employer is looking for.

Helpful guidelines to follow when overhauling your resume:

  • Move away from listing previous responsibilities and showcase your achievements.
  • Quantify your achievements with numbers and percentages.
  • Bullet points should share results first and then relay how the result was obtained.
  • If you’ve got it flaunt it, a resume is no place to be shy.
  • Remove the objective.
  • A two-page resume is acceptable if you are seeking an executive position.
  • A resume should be in chronological format unless you are recently out of school, if so, a functional format may highlight your talents efficiently.

Pro Tip — Recruiters may have a specific profile in mind when they are filling a position so make sure your resume fits that profile.

Pete Mockaitis Bio

Pete Mockaitis is an award-winning trainer who has served clients in over 50 countries. His work has enhanced Fortune 100 corporations, high-growth startups, and major nonprofits. He began his career at acclaimed consulting firms The Bridgespan Group and Bain & Company. Pete is also the host of the podcast, How to Be Awesome at Your Job, and the author of the book, Team Up: Becoming Accountable to Your Dreams.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is "Searching for Work in the Digital Era," from the Pew Research Center for Internet, Science and Technology. There are three trends highlighted by the report, and they are, the Internet is the primary form of research for job seekers, mobile phones are the primary job search tool, and social media is a growing research resource for finding jobs. The report is supported by quantifiable data.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Jenna offers her advice to listener Brett Williams, who asks: “How do you learn the typical salary local employers pay in your field?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017) or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice. Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). The book offers practical, actionable, and proven tools to help you get clear about your career goals, find hidden jobs, ace your next interview and more.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus Episode: Get Fired Up About Finding Your Passion, with Jenna Forstrom


Mon, Dec 26, 2016


What is your light-up, crazy, talk about it for hours passion? Does your dream job consist of you getting paid to do it every day? If so, Mac’s List Community Manager, Jenna Forstrom shares three very important questions to help you figure out what your passions are in the new Land Your Dream Job Anywhere. A book that allows you to get clear about your career goals, find hidden jobs that never get posted, ace your next job interview, negotiate the salary and benefits you’ve earned and take charge of your career now and into the future.

Jenna is passionate about her job. She is fascinated by how technology changes consumer behavior and how social media can be used as a storytelling tool. These things may not compare to drinking craft beer, serving the homeless or her dog, Bullet but the reality is Jenna gets to help people find their dream job using the technology and social media she is passionate about.

If you enjoyed this excerpt from Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, sign up to get the first chapter for free and early bird access to it on February 1st, 2017.

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 066: Fatal Flaws in Job Interviews, with Dan Miller


Wed, Dec 21, 2016


Did you just spill your coffee all down the front of your shirt? Or, did you forget to turn the ringer off your phone before the interview started?

Today’s guest expert, Dan Miller says the good thing about interview fails is that they are easily remedied. The number one thing Dan sees in interviewees, which hurt their chances at a position, is a lack of enthusiasm and energy. He says job seekers who want to show their enthusiasm should:

  • Walk briskly
  • Sit up straight
  • Speak from their diaphragm
  • Convey a lot of energy

These actions show the interviewer that you have something to offer, and as an employee, you are someone who will do more than expected. If you are an introvert, you don’t need to change who you are naturally, but show a lot of energy during a job interview.

Dan says job seekers should be prepared with a two-minute answer to the 20 most common interview questions. Interviewers want to know how a job candidate will handle a conflict or how they go about solving a problem. So, candidates should also prepare for a few behavioral questions.

An interview is a time set aside by a company to see if a job candidate is right for their organization. On the flip side, an interview is a time set aside by a job seeker to see if a particular company is right for them.

Interview Do’s and Don’ts:

  • Do ask the interviewer about the company at the end of the interview.
  • Don’t ask about the compensation for the job too quickly.
  • Do send a thank you as a follow-up immediately after the interview.
  • Do make yourself more memorable with a handwritten follow-up.
  • Do bring every ounce of enthusiasm you can muster to the interview.

Pro Tip — Preparation matters! Know the company’s mission statement and at least one thing about the person handling your interview before the interview starts.

Dan Miller Bio

Dan Miller is President of 48 Days a company that specializes in creative thinking for increased personal and business success. He is the author of the New York Times bestsellers, 48 Days To The Work You Love, No More Dreaded Mondays and Wisdom Meets Passion. Dan has been a featured guest on CBS’s The Early Show, MSNBC’s Hardball with Chris Matthews and the Dave Ramsey Show.  Dan will soon be introducing a seminar to accompany his book, 48 Days. Get a free copy of Dan’s 48 Days Goal Setting Workbook for 2017.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is a social media site specifically for job seekers. Jobcase is the networking equivalent of Linkedin but for people who are unemployed. It is a community for people who are looking for work. The forums are moderated by guest experts who are able to answer tough job-search-related questions.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Today’s question comes from Rachael Smith, who asks, “How long should I wait before following up with an employer after an interview?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017) or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice. Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). The book offers practical, actionable, and proven tools to help you get clear about your career goals, find hidden jobs, ace your next interview and more.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 065: How to Manage Money When You’ve Lost Your Job, with Eric Rosenberg


Wed, Dec 14, 2016


After you have fully processed what happened, your next step is to look at your budget to find your unnecessary expenses. Pull out large recurring expenses that may provide you enjoyment, but aren’t providing any tangible benefits. A cable bill is a good example of this. Every dollar you have saved becomes important if you are unsure of how long you will be without work. Other expenses which should be cut are things you can make at home for a lesser cost, such as coffees and meals.

Your financial accounts should be used in the following order:

  1. Checking — Use this fluid money first.
  2. Savings — Banks pay little to no interest in these accounts.
  3. Stocks — Sell off stocks if they are outside of a retirement account.
  4. 401K/IRA — Use this option only as a last resort.

Do you have student loans? Eric says no matter which type of student loan you have, federal or private, you should notify the lending institution that holds your loan. Many times, during hardships these institutions offer deferments, which lower your monthly loan payments, but the company continues to earn interest on the balance.

Ignoring health care coverage is a big no-no. In fact, under the Affordable Care Act, it is a requirement for individuals to have current health care coverage. Your previous employer is bound to offer you COBRA, which will allow you to keep your current level of coverage, but you must pay the employer’s previous contribution amount.

If you do not have enough money saved to last for at least 6-months consider a part-time job to make ends meet or to avoid going into debt.

Pro Tip — If you do spend money during unemployment, invest in something which will help you to get your next job!

Eric Rosenberg Bio

Eric Rosenberg is a finance writer who publishes the Personal Profitability Blog and the Personal Profitability Podcast. He has helped countless people clean up and fix their finances. Eric is proud to announce he has finally broken through the $10K a month threshold through his side business!  Find him on Twitter @EricProfits.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is the Occupational Outlook Handbook from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics. The site allows job seekers to search through 575 different professions. It includes a comprehensive job review, job requirements, and a job feasibility outlook through 2024.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Today’s question comes from Dennis Mace, who asks, “How can I best utilize the Mac’s List website?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017) or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice. Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). The book offers practical, actionable, and proven tools to help you get clear about your career goals, find hidden jobs, ace your next interview and more.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus Episode: Taking the Big Leap into Self-Employment, with Mac Prichard


Mon, Dec 12, 2016


Do you have what it takes to turn your entrepreneurial spirit into a small business? If you can answer yes to just one of three questions you are probably ready to go out on your own. It doesn’t matter if you come from a family of entrepreneurs or if you have been a full-time employee for your entire career. If you know how to run successful projects and want to make every day meaningful and leave the office with a deep level of satisfaction. You may be ready to branch out and start your own business.

Mac Prichard of Prichard Communications and Mac’s List shares his personal story and the resources he used to develop and grow two successful businesses. He had never thought of himself as a small business owner before launching Prichard communications but he was confident about his skill set and the work sounded exciting. Learn how Mac landed his dream job and more with the latest book from Mac's List, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere, available February 1, 2017.  Sign up for our email list to be the first to know about the book release and get a copy of the first chapter right away.

Find Your Dream Job is sponsored by Land Your Dream Job Anywhere. The book is launching February 1, 2017, sign up and get the first chapter now!

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 064: 8 Questions You Must Ask in an Interview, with J.T. O’Donnell


Wed, Dec 07, 2016


Most people leave a job interview and are no closer to knowing if they will be offered the position than when they sent in their resume. Even if they feel the interview went well they realize they forgot to ask about the company or the next steps in the job process. Waiting for the company to call with feedback can be agonizing. Mac’s List listeners can avoid uncertainty by following the steps provided in this episode.

So, what do you say when a hiring manager asks if you have any questions?

Guest expert, J.T. O’Donnell says to ask open-ended questions and to use the job interview to find out as much about the company as possible. If you don’t, you are missing out on an important opportunity to get to know the company better. This can help you to know you are making the right choice if a job offer appears.

The employer is expecting you to ask questions about how you can serve them and how you can earn the money they would be paying you. If your first questions are about you, it can come across selfish and self-absorbed. They want you to focus on them first. Prove that you have done your homework and demonstrate you want to learn more about the company in order to build trust and respect.

J.T. O’Donnell guides us through her 4C Strategy, which ultimately benefits both the job candidate and the employer. The 4 C’s and helpful open-ended question a job seeker should ask are:

  • Connect
    • “How did you come to work here?”
    • “What do you like most about working here?”
  • Corporate Culture
    • “Who is the most successful person hired in the last year?”
    • “Who has been the least successful person and what went wrong?”
  • Challenges
    • “What is the company’s biggest challenge this year?”
    • “How can my skills help you to overcome the challenge?”
  • Close
    • “Is there anything about my candidacy you would change to make me a better fit for this job?”
    • “What are the next steps in the hiring process?”

Pro Tip — Hiring Managers hire based on personality, aptitude, and experience.

J.T. O’Donnell Bio

J.T. O’Donnell is a career strategist and workplace consultant who helps American workers of all ages find greater professional satisfaction through courses on her website, Work it Daily. She is the author of Careerrealism: The Smart Approach to a Satisfying Career. And with Dale Dauten, she writes the career advice column "JT & Dale Talk Jobs", a nationally syndicated career advice column, that appears in more than 130 newspapers.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is the blog post, "What Colors to Wear to a Job Interview". It includes wardrobe basics and an in-depth look at the psychology of different colors. The article states that a black suit may come across too strong, but dark blue or dark gray will leave the right impression. Check it out.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Today’s questions come from Allison Rhinechisel who asks, “When transitioning from being a college student to an employee, what investment options, insurance options, and financial benefits should be considered?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive either a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017) or a Mac’s List Coffee Mug, your choice. Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). The book offers practical, actionable, and proven tools to help you get clear about your career goals, find hidden jobs, ace your next interview and more.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 063: Credibility Busters That Can Ruin Your Career, with Julie Broad


Wed, Nov 30, 2016


Are you a person who is thinking about the question you are going to ask more than you are thinking about the person who will be answering the question? Have you considered how your question or problem sounds to the other person? Guest expert Julie Broad says “People often think about themselves when they are communicating, when they should be carefully considering what matters to the other person.” Considering what perspective the question should be framed in so it matters to the other person, can make it a very different conversation AND increase your credibility.

Job seekers should know that their vocal pace, vocal tone and body language, can erode their credibility when communicating. Julie encourages job seekers to not worry so much about what they say and to focus on how they are saying it. Making a confident statement can elevate your message.

If you are not sure how you are communicating, try recording your side of a business conversation, or ask a trusted colleague to critique you during a networking event.

Your Cadence Matters:

  • Talking too fast may make it difficult for people to understand you.
  • Talking too slow may be perceived as lower intelligence.
  • Too many filter words (ah, umm, like) may derail your credibility.

The most important things about your communications are that your message comes through clearly, and you demonstrate you know what you are talking about.

Listen to the podcast to find out how the company you keep, and your appearance may also affect your credibility.

Pro Tip - Dress in a way that makes you feel confident!

Julie Broad Bio

Julie Broad is a successful entrepreneur, speaker, and workshop trainer.  Her company, Have More Influence, helps people build personal brands that get results, and move forward in their careers and businesses. She is the author of the Amazon best-seller,The New Brand You: Your New Image Makes the Sale for You, which helps people get comfortable with communicating and attract the business they want to attract.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

In today’s job market, employers are not only looking at your resume but your entire online presence. Ben’s resource this week is a Mac’s List original. The completely free, 3-session online course How to Wow and Woo Employers Online details easy tips and tested tactics for making your personal brand, and getting the most out of your online and social media presence. With 87% of employers checking into you online, it is best to be prepared by using this efficient Mac’s List tool. You can also visit the Mac’s List Facebook page to see a video of our listener LinkedIn upgrades.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Today’s question comes from Susan Parson. Susan asks, “What is the current wisdom about the elevator pitch, and if you want to be authentic, is the elevator pitch still feasible?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 2017). Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course is now live, so register today but hurry because the course closes on December 1, 2016.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus Episode: Engagement Rings and Interviews


Mon, Nov 28, 2016


With engagement season fast approaching, the Mac's List team (Publisher, Mac Prichard; Managing Director, Ben Forstag; and Community Manager, Jenna Forstrom) sat down to talk about Bruce Hurwitz's LinkedIn post, "When interviewing for a job, lose the ring!"  

This article was published on August 12, 2016, and caused a bit of media frenzy with over 1,403 comments and 1,020 shares.  Hurwitz specifically calls out women who wear large engagement rings as being "high maintenance" and thus hiring managers aren't willing to give them a job offer.  Mac Prichard makes a good point that it's illegal to make hiring decisions based on marital status.  While it's hard to prove that this is happening, chances are, if you are interviewing for a job that has some questionable hiring practices, you wouldn't want to work there anyways.  Ben chimes in that some hiring managers might see a wedding ring on a young woman's hand and assume that they are going to leave the job to raise a family or need time off for maternity leave.  Jenna adds that there are some places, like in food service, where no jewelry is allowed, in that case, it's not worth wearing a ring.  Mac continues the conversation by pointing out that visibly pregnant women also struggle finding employment for similar reasons.  

Discrimination is real when it comes to job hunting, but the data points to it being more of a gender issue versus an engagement issue. What has your experience been?  Have you ever felt like wearing an engagement ring has hindered your chances of getting a job?  Leave a comment below.

Find Your Dream Job is sponsored by Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course is now live, until November 30, 2016 so sign up today!

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 062: How to Find Jobs and Recruiters on Twitter, with Chris Russell


Wed, Nov 23, 2016


Did you know there are jobs shared on Twitter every day? If you know how to look for the jobs you want, Twitter provides you with an opportunity to connect with the person behind the posting. Twitter should be looked at as a real time job search engine and communication channel, says guest expert Chris Russell.

The best way to search Twitter for jobs is by using keywords and hashtags (#). In the Twitter search bar, simply enter # plus your career field (e.g. #marketing) and then your location to see all the latest Tweets about jobs in your area. Hashtags help filter your results so you only get the tweets that pertain to your query. Also, if you click on a hashtag, you will see all the other Tweets from those who have used your same keyword.

Recruiters are actively posting jobs on Twitter. A job seeker can even find job boards and save past searches to access search results at a later time.

Popular hashtags with job seekers and recruiters are:

Twitter gives you the ability to have a one-to-one, personal conversation with a recruiter representing the company you want to work for. You can use it to rise above your job search competition, to promote yourself as an expert in your industry or to establish your personal brand.

If you would like to build a relationship with a recruiter on Twitter try:

  • Retweeting their posts
  • Making them a favorite
  • Asking them the best way to apply for a job
  • Being nice

Pro Tip — Don’t ask for a job right away. Start a simple dialogue first!

Chris Russell Bio

Chris Russell is the Founder of CareerCloud.com. Widely considered to be the 'mad scientist of online recruiting, Chris has been connecting job seekers to employers since 1999. When he's not running Career Cloud, you can find Chris on his kayak or biking his local rail trail. Chris has provided a list of career tools at tools.careercloud.com, which includes a job board list for every state.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is Jobvite’s Recruiter Nation 2016 Annual Social Recruiting Survey. The data and infographics included cover general hiring trends, tips for job seekers and how employers find job candidates. The report was compiled from 1600 different recruiters.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Today’s question comes from Sierra Winegarner who attended our Career Pathways and Doing Good Event. She asks, “Is it OK to have a multiple page resume?”

*The difference between a resume and a CV is: A resume is roughly one to two pages and a CV includes everything in your professional career.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course is now live, so register today!

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 061: Why Your Resume Isn’t Getting You Interviews, with Andrea Gerson


Wed, Nov 16, 2016


Can your resume engage a human resource manager and make them want to read more? Or, does it just blend in with all other task-oriented resumes they receive?

This week’s guest expert Andrea Gerson has seen thousands of resumes, and shares her best practices to help you get the attention of your intended employer. She says, “It can be challenging for people to quantify what they have done, and to brag about their contributions.”

Most people are encouraged to be humble and not to boast about their accomplishments, but a job seeker can miss out on a great career opportunity, if they don’t properly quantify their competencies and qualify their contributions on their resume.

Use these resume tips to help you get an interview:

  • Use the primary real estate (top third) of your resume to engage your reader.
  • Add quantitative information about your high-level accomplishments that pertain to the job for which you are applying.
  • Include your goals and intentions, and how they may benefit the prospective company.
  • Add pertinent information in bite-sized pieces, and in concise bullet points.
  • Use the S.T.A.R. Framework, and be consistent when formatting your resume.

You have one chance to make an impact to get the job you want. Make the most of it!

Andrea Gerson Bio

Andrea Gerson helps professionals find clarity, confidence, and a renewed sense of energy in their work. Andrea is the founder of Resume Scripter. She has created and edited resumes and cover letters for more than 3,000 people. And, her client’s organizations have included Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Bloomberg, Morgan Stanley, JP Morgan Chase, the United Nations, and The Red Cross.

Ben’s Job Search Resource:

Ben’s resource this week is from Epic CV’s resume section and is titled "10 Pros, 4 Cons and 5 Risks of Graphic Resumes". 9 out of 10 people do not benefit from a non-traditional resume, but if your job description includes graphic design or creative director, a graphic resume may give you an advantage. If you are applying for a job and you know your resume will go through an automated keyword based system, do not, don’t, never ever and refrain from submitting a graphic resume.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac respond to Heath Padgett’s question, “How do you support members of your family while they look for a job?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course is now live, so register today!

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus Episode: Politics and Job Hunting


Mon, Nov 14, 2016


The U.S. presidential election wrapped up last week, but politics remains a charged and potentially divisive issue. This brings up an interesting question for job seekers: how much of your own political beliefs should you share online and with prospective employers? How much politics is too much politics?

This is part of a larger conversation about balancing your values against how those values impact your job search. It's important to be yourself so that you can find the right organizational culture fit. At the same time, you need to know that nearly any political posture may limit your job search options.

Tips from the Mac's List Team:

  • Remove any inflammatory political statements from social media.
  • Know your Facebook privacy settings.  (Need some help with this? Check out our free course, How to Wow and Woo Employers Online.)
  • Practice restraint. "Don't be the crazy uncle at Thanksgiving Dinner."
  • Don't write anything that you wouldn't want to be seen as a headline on a major newspaper.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 060: How to Manage the New World of Reference Checking, with Ray Bixler


Wed, Nov 09, 2016


In the past, hiring managers using a telephone to solicit feedback from job references yielded a low, 50% return rate. Today, online reference tools and surveys boast a reference return rate of 85-90%! For job seekers, this makes furnishing quality referrals to potential employers a necessity.

“Feedback is accumulated by various ways,” says guest expert, Ray Bixler. Metrics evaluated by employers include the number of references a job seeker offers, how long it takes an applicant to enter the reference names and what feedback the references supply. Job seekers can improve their results by being prepared with complete information about their references and entering the information as soon as the prospective employer sends the email.

Tips for Job Seekers:

  • Meet with your references to ask their permission to use their name and to let them know what is expected of them.
  • Have your references ready in advance, as the reference process is moving ahead in the hiring process; sometimes references are requested before the first interview is granted.
  • Give five references, with at least two being former managers.
  • Fill out an employer’s reference request completely, and as soon as possible after receiving it.

Remember, a prepared reference has time to think about all the great things you have done!

Ray Bixler Bio

Ray Bixler is CEO of SkillSurvey, an online reference checking technology firm that helps organizations recruit, hire, and retain talent. Ray has more than 20 years of human resource and career development experience. Ray’s organization has just launched the new solution, Source. Source gives references an opportunity to become applicants with the employer requesting their input.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben’s resource this week is a blog post from Main St entitled "5 Job Reference Myths That Can Destroy Your Chances and Reputation." The content includes common occurrences job seekers frequently overlook. Be sure to listen to Mac’s List bonus episode about ”How to Deal with a Bad Reference,” with Vicki Lind.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac respond to Paul Frazier’s question, “How to negotiate salary, benefits and time off when you fear an employer may rescind the job offer.”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course is now live, so register today!

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 059: How Women Can Shatter the Glass Ceiling, with Elisa Doucette


Wed, Nov 02, 2016


The “glass ceiling” is a concept that a woman who tries to progress in her career may only reach a mid-level position, says guest expert Elisa Doucette. The phrase, “glass ceiling,” denotes that a woman is able to see men, through a pane of glass, in positions above her own, but she is not able to break the glass, to reach a higher level in the organization.  Elisa says corporations have adopted a set of values towards women (or men) who are not willing to put aside their career or personal values and sell their souls, to make money. And although the concept has evolved since the 1970’s, the glass ceiling still exists -- just in a modified form.

Elisa says corporations have adopted a set of values towards women (or men) who are not willing to put aside their career or personal values and sell their souls, to make money. And although the concept has evolved since the 1970’s, the glass ceiling still exists -- just in a modified form.

Women need to understand the paradigm and know that corporations aren’t out to get them just because they are a woman. A woman needs to understand what motivates her employer and use actions -- not just words -- to show her value.

If a woman can show how she will impact the company’s bottom line, she can start owning her own trajectory within the organization.

Three tips women can use to show their employer how amazing they are:

  1. Quantify your accomplishments with hard numbers, to show the value you bring to an organization.
  2. Make sure your voice is heard, and be willing to defend your opinions.
  3. Understand your priorities, both business and personal.

Move past “What can I do about it?” and start developing your iron will and thick skin!

Elisa Doucette Bio

Elisa Doucette is a freelance writer and editor.  Her work has been featured in

The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Yahoo! Small Business, The Huffington Post, and Brazen Careerist. She runs the online editorial agency, Craft Your Content, and hosts the weekly podcast, Writers’ Rough Drafts. Elisa is also responsible for the syndicated column, Shattering Glass, on Forbes.com. She can be found on Twitter, @elisadoucette, and on Instagram, @elisa_doucette.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben’s resource this week is a list of 250 Flexible Jobs for 2016, which can be  found at FlexJobs 250: Companies with the Most Flexible Jobs. A flexible work schedule can benefit any employee, but traditionally women tend to take more responsibility in caring for older relatives and children. Flexjobs can include telecommuting, part-time work, and freelance opportunities.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac respond to Dan Reifenberger’s question, “How do I attract a company I want to work for if it isn’t currently hiring?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org, or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air, you will receive a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). Or, if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org, and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course in now live, so sign up today!

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus Episode: How to Hack the Hidden Job Market


Mon, Oct 31, 2016


On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, the Mac's List team, Mac Prichard, Ben Forstag, and Jenna Forstrom talk about the single biggest mistake most job seekers make.

They spend too much time and energy on job boards!

Job boards can be a great resource. But did you know, 8 out of 10 jobs never make it on a job board?  That's employers prefer to hire candidates they already know and trust.  If you are looking for a job only on job boards, chances are you are missing out on 80% of the job opportunities you might be interested in.  As a business owner - even one who owns a job board site - Mac uses the hidden job market to hire his employees.

If you are looking for a job only on job boards, chances are you are missing out on 80% of all job opportunities!

Want to learn more about this hidden job market?  Today, we launched the Hack the Hidden Job Market online course.  It's a 12-part video course, where Mac walks you through the entire job hunting process. It's full of practical tips for job hunting, strategies for networking, and is completely inspired our community's questions that we've been hearing at Mac's List for years.

In Hack the Hidden Job Market, we remove the curtain of confusion when it comes to job seeking.  Help you get focused on your career goals, which allows you to job hunt effectively.  Plus, we've got tons of additional bonus materials, podcasts, PDFs, website resources and a private Facebook group with monthly mastermind meetings with the entire Mac's List team.

Interested in learning more?  Sign up for Hack the Hidden Job Market is available now at www.macslist.org/course.  Find your dream job faster and with less frustration!



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Ep. 058: Is it Time to Look for Your Next Job? with Rob Walker


Wed, Oct 26, 2016


The days of working for the same company for 30-years and retiring with a full pension are a thing of the past. Today, people have a powerful sense they need to consistently consider what their next career or job change will be. There are even employees who are worried about what hiring managers will think about a long stint at just one company.

Guest expert New York Times Columnist, Rob Walker, says hiring managers look more for applicable skills or a major red flag than time on job titles. He says it’s important to stay on top of what is available in the job market and to periodically conduct informational interviews so you know what your value is in the marketplace. Checking job boards can also help a job seeker to understand what additional skills they could acquire before they might need to find other employment.

Keep your resume current if opportunities for growth arise in your current environment. And, be proactive about changes you can make in the workplace.

Signs it might be time to move on:

  • Issues in Business Sector.
  • Your responsibilities are diminishing.
  • Someone starts taking over your tasks.

If you do get a new job when departing your current company:

  • Follow the rules of the organization. If they request two-weeks notice, give two-weeks notice.
  • Don’t try to settle scores during your exit, no matter how angry you are.

Your skills are valuable! Make sure you know what you are worth.

Rob Walker Bio

Rob Walker writes the "The Workologist" column for the Sunday business section of The New York Times and blogs for Design Observer.  He’s the author of four books and has written for such publications as Slate.com, New York Times Magazine, Money, and The American Lawyer. You can find out more about Rob at RobWalker.net.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben’s resource this week is the list of The Best (and Worst) Jobs in 2016 from CareerCast. The list is based on factors such as salary, work environment, and job prospects.  It may not be as awesome as puppy watching or Crayola Color Girl, but being a Data Scientist tops the list of the best job on the planet. You may not want to know what the worst job on the list is, just in case it is what you are doing right now.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac respond to Karl Borton’s question — “How do I market myself to employers in states other than my own?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air you will receive a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st .

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 057: Find Your Inner Voice in a Job Interview, with Caroline Dowd-Higgins


Wed, Oct 19, 2016


Did you just land an interview? Congratulations! Now, it’s time to prepare.

The interview stage is the time to show an organization how you will fit into the culture and how you can solve a company’s problems. It is the first time the organization will see you, hear your voice and get an impression, so make it impactful. Guest expert, Caroline Dowd-Higgins, shares her professional tips on how to land your dream job through great interview techniques.

Caroline says research before an interview is imperative but it’s something many people fail to do. To prepare, first, print out a copy of the job description, highlight the attributes the company is looking for and write down a compelling story and/or an example of how you embody these points. Using the job description to help the interviewer understand why you are a good fit shows initiative.

Storytelling Tips:

  • Practice.
  • If you don’t have a specific skill, find something that is relatable.
  • Start with “I’d like to tell you a story.”
  • Make your stories natural and authentic.

Chemistry and culture are a huge part of whether or not an applicant will fit into an organization. Given the amount of time we spend with our work families, it is vital that we not only fit into an organization but fit well. Show your true self during an interview so the hiring manager can get a clear picture of what you will be like at work.

Pro Tip - Take a video of yourself practicing for your interview. Use appropriate body language. Remember, a strong voice exudes confidence, eye contact makes a connection, and filler words can be eliminated with a little practice.

And, if for any reason you do not feel you were able to share your skills and abilities completely during the course of the interview, use closing remarks to summarize why you are a good fit for the position.

Go Get ‘em Tiger!

Caroline Dowd-Higgins Bio

Caroline Dowd-Higgins is executive director of career and professional development for the Indiana University Alumni Association.

She’s the author of the book, This Is Not the Career I Ordered and she has a new book, Thrive! Where You Are, coming out in 2017 . Caroline also hosts the podcast, Your Working Life, and the online video series, Thrive! And she’s a regular contributor to the Huffington Post, Ellevate Women’s Network, The Rouse, and The Chronicle newspaper.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben’s resource this week is a post from the Recruitloop blog. It is a list of 75 hypothetical experience-based questions that draw from past experiences in an effort to anticipate future reactions. 75 Behavioural Interview Questions To Select The Best Candidate. What makes this list special is that it is designed for recruiters.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac respond to Katherine Moore’s question — “How can I persuade my employer to pay for my continuing education?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. If we use your question on the air you will receive a copy of our new book, Land Your Dream Job Anywhere (to be published February 1, 2017). Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Ben and Jenna’s segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st .If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: "Why wouldn't you hire me?"


Mon, Oct 17, 2016


On an earlier podcast, guest expert, Hannah Morgan, spoke about how to nail your next phone interview.  While wrapping up the interview, she suggested informing the hiring manager you are still interested in the role and asking the question, "Would you think of any reason why I wouldn't be moved forward in this process?"  We thought this was a great question, that required a little more in depth conversation.  On this podcast bonus, Mac, Ben, and Jenna sit down and talk about the pros and cons of asking, "Why wouldn't you hire me?"

Have you asked this question before?  Share your thoughts or experiences in the comments below.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st — Lock in your early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 056: How to Get the Most Out of Your Day, with Matt Kepnes


Wed, Oct 12, 2016


If you are between jobs you may find yourself with an abundance of unstructured time on your hands. Trying to make the most out of your day will be frustrating if you don’t know how to effectively manage your time. Guest expert, Matt Kepnes, aka Nomadic Matt, shares his tips and processes for accomplishing large and small tasks, even if you are on the road.

Creating artificial constructs within your day can force you to complete assignments and is more effective than making a list. Lists are great for the grocery store but if you want to make sure harder tasks are tackled, create a schedule for yourself. One method to create an artificial construct is batching. Batching is restricting blocks of your time for one specific task. For example, batching emails for one hour means you will only read and respond to emails within hour you have blocked.

Distractions can kill productivity. Social media sites, phone calls, and unplanned interruptions are things we all get distracted by. To reduce the level of distractions during your work time Matt recommends job seekers:

  • Create routines. Familiarity lowers the chance of interferences.
  • Use the Self-Control app to block distracting websites during your work hours.
  • Schedule projects in advance and then follow the daily schedule.
  • Go to a coffee shop with wifi to get away from distractions when working from home.

Schedule a block of time to polish up your resume!

Matt Kepnes Bio

Matthew Kepnes runs the award winning budget travel site, Nomadic Matt, and wrote the New York Times bestseller, How to Travel the World on $50 a Day. After a trip to Thailand in 2005, Matt decided to quit his job, finish his MBA and head off into the world. His original trip was supposed to last a year. Over ten years later, he is still out roaming around and teaching others how to do the same.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben’s resource this week is a free online tool to save job seekers from the embarrassment of typos and grammatical errors. Grammarly can be used online or as a plugin and it identifies over 250 types of writing errors, many of which Microsoft Word doesn’t catch. Grammarly’s versatility allows it to function on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, etc. when added as a plugin to the Chrome browser.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac respond to Kelly G.’s question — “How do I market my soft skills?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st — Lock in your early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 055: How to Nail Your Next Phone Interview, with Hannah Morgan


Wed, Oct 05, 2016


Employers may use phone interviews to save time, get a sense of an applicant’s personality and test their skill level. This phone screening saves an employer time allowing them to weed out those who may not have essential skills needed for the open position.

Job applicants do not always know when a hiring manager or recruiter will be calling to conduct an interview. If you are caught unprepared or your situation is not ideal to respond to their questions,  it is perfectly acceptable to ask the interviewer to reschedule the call. But, be sure to ask for their number, so the follow-up task belongs to you — not the interviewer.

Guest expert, Hannah Morgan says it is a good idea to do your homework and research the company and job posting thoroughly before the phone interview. She says it is best to prepare yourself with stories and examples of times you succeeded in completing similar tasks required for the job and focus on the positive outcomes. Use the company’s website to find out about its mission statement and who its customers are. The more you know the more relaxed you will be during the interview. Background research also helps you to prepare a list of questions to help you gain insights about your possible future employer. Pro Tip: Your questions should be different if you are speaking with a manager in the division you wish to work in than if you are speaking with a person in Human Resources.

Non-verbal body language is important during a phone interview. Try these tried and true techniques:

  • Stand up or walk around during the interview. This opens up your diaphragm and projects your voice.
  • Smile while speaking. It enhances your voice.
  • Don’t talk over the interviewer. Take a moment before answering questions to ensure you don’t interrupt.
  • Dress in business attire. Studies show people feel more confident when they are dressed up.

Always end the conversation with questions about possible timeframes for filling the opening, when you should expect to hear back from the employer and  anything else you don’t want to be left wondering about. Hannah says some job seekers will even end with a trial close. The question “Can you think of any reason why you wouldn’t move me forward in the process?” allows applicants to clarify any possible misunderstandings and to overcome objections.

Show courtesy and always send a thank you note!

Hannah Morgan Bio

Hannah Morgan is the founder of Career Sherpa.net Her talks, blog posts, and books offer no-nonsense, actionable advice to active and passive job seekers.  Hannah writes a weekly column for U.S. News & World Report and is the author of The Infographic Resume, published by McGraw-Hill Education. For additional career-related information follow Hannah on Twitter @careersherpa.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben shares a blog post titled, Can I Turn Down a Skype Interview and Suggest a Phone Call Instead?, from the Ask a Manager blog which is managed by Allison Green. The article suggests it is OK to request a phone call based on the available technology.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac respond to Nathan Brennan’s question — “Is there a good way to respond to an unsolicited salary rate a recruiter presents to you over the phone?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st — Lock in your early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus Episode: Mac Prichard on Copeland Coaching


Mon, Oct 03, 2016


On August 30, 2016 Mac Prichard, founder and publisher of Mac’s List, talked with Angela Copeland, career coach and founder of Coaching Copeland, a website that has been helping job seekers for over 10 years.  On top of that, Copeland is a Career Corner newspaper columnist and author of "Breaking the Rules & Getting the Job."  She also runs Copeland Coaching Podcast, where she interviewed Mac.

In this podcast episode, Mac shares his secrets to hacking the hidden job market, to mastering informational interviews, and how long your job search should really take.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 054: Treat Your Career as if You’re an Entrepreneur, with Michelle Ward


Wed, Sep 28, 2016


Do you have a personal website, a personal business card or a folder of compliments you have received? If not, you should, says this week’s guest expert, Michelle Ward of When I Grow Up Coach. A person is more than their current job title. And often, personal projects and hobbies tell more of your story than your job description does.

If you want to stay in the driver’s seat of your career, you should consistently keep up on what is working for you and any wins you have. Create a separate folder (online or on paper) and add any kudos or accolades you receive throughout the course of a year, and update your resume accordingly. This will save you time and frustration during your annual performance review and you will be ready in the event that an unexpected opportunity arises.

These resources make it easy to:

  • Track your accomplishments online with Evernote
  • Share information about yourself with About.me
  • Give hiring managers a reason to be interested in you with Branded.me

Michelle also advises job seekers to create an elevator pitch about themselves. You are much more than your field of work. When someone asks you what you do, expound on your job title by adding your skills set. This is extremely useful if you are attending a networking event or conference. Remember, conferences are opportunities for learning and connecting.

Don’t dread your work!

Michelle Ward Bio

Michelle Ward has been offering career guidance for creative women as

“The When I Grow Up Coach” since 2008. She is the co-author of The Declaration of You, published by North Light Books. Michelle also teaches a class, Create Your Dream Career and Ditch Your Day Job, on CreativeLive.com.

Michelle is excited to be launching her new program, 90 Day Business Launch at the end of October. You can find out more about Michelle Ward and all of her programs on her website When I Grow Up Coach. You can also sign up to get access to her free monthly interview series.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben shares a job search app for your mobile phone called Switch. It’s a quick and easy way to see what jobs are available in your area and if they are of interest to you. Switch has been dubbed the Tinder of job searches.   

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac respond to Matt Cundill’s question — “How do you know if it is time to leave your industry for a new sector and how do you successfully make the change?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st — Lock in your early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 053: How to Make the Most of a Networking Event, with Angela Copeland


Wed, Sep 21, 2016


If the purpose of networking is to build relationships, then why would you only network when you are job hunting? Guest expert, Angela Copeland says it takes time for someone to get to know you, so start networking now. If you are unsure of  where to find information about networking events, Angela suggests to look online for associations or groups in your field of work, contact the local Chamber of Commerce or go to Meetup.com.

You may feel more comfortable at a networking event that is a good fit for you. It’s advisable to target events where you have a decent chance of meeting people in your field, you can really connect to. Pro Tip — If you are looking to change fields, have business cards made with your contact information, leaving off your current field of work.

It’s okay if you find professional events awkward and scary, everyone else who is there feels the same way. Angela recommends going to networking events alone and being on the lookout for someone who is also there alone. If a person is deeply engaged in conversation with another person, you are less likely to make an impact if you approach. If you do approach someone, ask them personal questions. Personal questions can open people up and help to form a deeper connection.

Remember, the person who lands a job is not always the most qualified. It is the person the hiring manager likes the most or has a connection with.

Networking Event Do’s:

  • Do have a pitch about yourself in case someone asks.
  • Do make a positive first impression through body language, a smile and being properly dressed for the occasion.
  • Do make sure to be pleasant and authentic.
  • Do ask personal questions instead of business questions.
  • Do learn something new.
  • Do follow up with an email or LinkedIn connection with every person you meet.

Networking Event Dont’s:

  • Don’t talk about your job search.
  • Don’t just talk with the person who attended with you.
  • Don’t forget networking and relationship building takes time.
  • Don’t get discouraged if you don’t make a connection at the event.

Shake everyone’s hand firmly and be pleasant!

Angela Copeland Bio

Angela Copeland is the CEO of Copeland Coaching. Her firm helps people at all stages of the job search process, including finding the right job, interviewing for a position, and negotiating an offer.

Angela is the author of Breaking The Rules and Getting The Job. She also hosts the Copeland Coaching Podcast and writes a weekly syndicated newspaper column on careers. If you would like to follow Angela on Twitter, @CopelandCoach is her handle.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben shares a LinkedIn post from Melissa De Witte Do-It-Yourself Headshots - And You Can Even Use Your iPhone. The article includes the exact steps and settings you will need to get a professional looking headshot, which is essential for your LinkedIn profile.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide feedback to Pat Guiles’ audio question — “How should I inform my previous employer about my new job?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st — Lock in your early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus Episode: Mac’s Interview on the Making Oregon Podcast


Mon, Sep 19, 2016


On July 14, 2016 Mac Prichard, founder and publisher of Mac’s List, talked with Terry Starbucker, cofounder and publisher of Built Oregon, a monthly online magazine that serves to tell Oregon entrepreneurial stories.  Built Oregon also has a podcast called, Making Oregon, this podcast brings you Built Oregon conversations with innovators, makers, doers, disruptors, foodies, dreamers, and groundbreakers from all across the state of Oregon.  These entrepreneurs talk about the inspiration and ingenuity it takes to make Oregon the best place they know to build and sustain a prosperous lifestyle.

In this podcast episode, Mac and Terry talk about the Mac's List story and how to find a career driven by purpose.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 052: What Successful People Do Differently, with Don Hutcheson


Wed, Sep 14, 2016


There is a structure or blueprint to being a successful person but there is no perfect formula. The design differs for everyone, as guest expert Don Hutcheson explains. It is necessary to dig into who you are and what you are supposed to be doing before attempting to be successful at any one thing.

The first quality all successful people have in common is they take full responsibility for their own self-knowledge and self-awareness, and they avoid mindless conformity. If you start with a solid base of knowing who you are on the inside, you eliminate the guessing which leads to reactions and unsatisfactory career choices.

Other things successful people have in common is they are all on a lifelong journey of learning, and they surround themselves with like-minded people. They read educational resources about how to use their individual talents and how to strengthen their emotional intelligence. People go through what Don calls “turning points” every 6 or 7 years. If they have a continuous mindset to keep getting better, these turning points will enhance their already honed abilities.

To be successful:

  • Do research about yourself and your abilities
  • Set goals for yourself
  • Surround yourself with the right people
  • Accept failure and learn from it
  • Be disciplined
  • Trust your instincts
  • Make strategic decisions, not knee-jerk reactions
  • Don’t be miserable
  • Journal about your experiences
  • Seek out people who have the same values!

Book Resources from Don:

What Should I Do With My Life? by Po Bronson

What Color Is Your Parachute? by Dick Bolles

Don’t Waste Your Talents by Don Hutcheson & Dr. Bob McDonald

Don Hutcheson Bio

Don Hutcheson is a lifelong entrepreneur, inventor, author and coach. He hosts the daily podcast, Discover Your Talent — Do What You Love and has interviewed over 350 successful people. By the end of 2016, he will be offering membership groups and courses, which will include experts on topics such as emotional intelligence, salary negotiations and exposing natural abilities.  Don has never had a boss. Instead, he has created six companies in advertising, publishing, coaching and career planning over the last 40 years.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben shares the blog post How to Tell People What You Do—and Be Remembered by Alexandra Franzen on TheMuse.com. The post is about how you can communicate what you do in simple terms, which begins with the Maya Angelou quote “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel."

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide feedback to Sue Black’s question - “Is there a great career coach for young, recent college grads?” Jenna recommends career coach Satya Byock from Quarter-Life Counseling in the Portland area and Stacey Marie Ishmael’s BuzzFeed podcast, Another Round.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st - lock in your early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes (http://www.macslist.org/itunes). We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 051: How Women Can Get Back to Work After a Career Break, with Jennifer Gefsky


Wed, Sep 07, 2016


Did you know 90% of women who opt out of the workforce will return at some point? The most common reason women decide to opt out is to take care of their children, and in the case of the Generation X-ers to care for elderly parents.

While most companies are keenly aware of the necessities of a family, a woman  who is planning to take a career break should plan for her future. Guest expert, Jennifer Gefsky, advises women to start a log of everything they do during their time off. This planning will make the process of reintroducing themselves into the workforce easier.

Women do a lot of unpaid work and gain skills, which can be used when transitioning back into the workforce. It’s important to document any work or accomplishments earned in Mom’s groups, in their children's schools or from  volunteering in their communities.

Tips to make a transition back into the workforce easier:

  • Keep your professional network alive
  • Strategically consider what you want to do
  • Educate yourself towards your passions
  • Dive into your personal networks
  • Learn to brand yourself

The resume gap scares many people. It’s best to own the gap! Don’t explain it away?address it up front because when you show the employer how it can translate back into their business, it won’t need to be justified.

Do not be afraid to fail!

Jennifer Gefsky Bio

Jennifer Gefsky formerly worked as deputy general counsel at Major League Baseball, where she was the highest-ranking woman on the “baseball” side of the business. Jennifer left baseball to raise her three children, and after her career break, she decided not to return to the business of baseball.

Jennifer co-founded Apr?s, a digital recruiting site that connects high-caliber women, who want to re-enter the workforce, with great jobs. The website is full of information and you can find @Apr?sNYC on Twitter and on Facebook at Apr?s.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Ben shares an amazing online resource this week. Skillshare is an educational site that job hunters can use to acquire additional technical skills. These skills can be used to enhance a current skill set or as a resume filler?to help you get the job you want. There is a cost for courses but many are priced as low as $.99. There are thousands of courses available, along with a global community of learners and teachers who are pursuing work they love.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide feedback to Erin, from Oregon, on her question - “What is the best way to present her time off to raise her children on her resume and in person? ”

Watch the Mother’s Job Description Hallmark Video Jenna refers to in the podcast.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st - lock in your early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes (http://www.macslist.org/itunes). We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus: Why Don’t Employers Include a Salaries in Job Posts?


Mon, Sep 05, 2016


On July 14, 2016, Ben Forstag published a blog post on Mac’s List, “Why Employers Don’t Include Salaries in their Job Posts (and What You Can Do About It).” This sparked a lengthy and lively discussion in the comments section. We decided to continue the conversation on this week’s Find Your Dream Job podcast.  Mac, Ben and Jenna discuss why employers don’t post a salary range in a job posts and share tips on how you can work around this all-too-common practice.

Our tips include:

  • Researching other job postings by the company.
  • Using Glassdoor.com to come up with an estimate.
  • Asking the hiring manager, recruiter or personal contact you know at the company.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 050: Why You Need to Toot Your Own Horn at Work Now, with Dan Rust


Wed, Aug 31, 2016


Keeping a record of career accomplishments is an employee’s own responsibility. If a manager is accountable for ten people, they may not remember the special thing one team member did ten months ago. A person can make it easier on themselves and on their manager by keeping track of their accomplishments, and by letting managers know, specifically, what those accomplishments are. This becomes a powerful tactic when a juicy promotion becomes available.

Self-promotion and managing your career is part of your career. An employee should want to gain as much as they can during the course of their career, says guest expert Dan Rust. Self-promotional strategies should be genuine, positive and occur during the course of a normal workday.

Tactics to help you toot your own horn at work:

  • Have a response for your boss when they ask how things are going.
  • Make the most of your annual review.
  • Make them see you sweat, BUT meet your deadlines.
  • Offer to help others and tell your boss about it.
  • Promote others.

The key is to not be anonymous. Make your ideas or insights known, during a conference call or meeting, even if the idea is incomplete. A study found that those who are willing to step forward with an unpopular idea, leave other people with a higher perception of them.

Furthering your career path is a game you can win!

Dan Rust Bio

Dan Rust is the founder of Frontline Learning, a publisher of corporate training resources. He regularly speaks on employee engagement, productivity and career management. Dan is also the author of a new book, Workplace Poker: Are You Playing the Game, Or Just Getting Played?, and more information can be found at his website Workplace Poker.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Keeping track of accomplishments is useful for many reasons, including resume creation or updates, annual reviews, and for realizing one’s value. Finding the time to pull all of your accomplishments together can be a difficult task in itself. This thorough article, Tools and Techniques for Brainstorming and Tracking Accomplishments from Livecareer.com includes information on journaling techniques, organizational apps and third-party validation ideas.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide feedback to Brenda Somes’ question - “How does a super-qualified candidate get a serious employer to even talk to her?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, email it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you’ve found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course. The course launches November 1st - lock in your early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes (http://www.macslist.org/itunes). We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 049: How to Get Your Next Raise, with Josh Doody


Wed, Aug 24, 2016


Does your manager fail to notice your accomplishments at evaluation time? If so, it is because “managers are busy” says salary negotiation expert Josh Doody. In addition to managing people, managers are also responsible for running the business and making a profit. Many companies only consider giving employees raises during a focal or anniversary period which can be the most politically challenging time for an employee to ask for a raise.

The best way to get a raise or to maximize your salary is to start by doing your homework. Employees should start building their case for a raise 30-60 days before a review and make the process as easy as possible for a manager.

To build the best case when asking for a raise you should:

One:  Have a target salary in mind which is based on your market value.

Two:  Put a case together with proof you deserve what you are asking for.

  • Ask for a specific raise amount.
  • Outline the quantitative accomplishments since your current salary was set.
  • Show which activities you have performed and the result they have made to move the business forward.
  • Prepare a list of accolades or social proof from others who have recognized your work.

Three:  Show how you are improving the company and how your results align with the goals of the business.

When building a case employees should not include reasons which do not carry a positive result for the business such as, buying a new house, kids in college, etc.

Remember to make the process as easy on your manager as possible!

Josh Doody Bio

Josh Doody is an author, consultant, MBA, and engineer who writes about salary negotiation, career management, business, job interviews, and self-publishing.  He is the author of Fearless Salary Negotiation: A Step-by-Step Guide to Getting Paid What You’re Worth. His current focus is in reaching people directly through one-on-one coaching programs and his Free 7-day course on how to get promoted quickly. You can follow Josh on Twitter @JoshDoody.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Anyone can use Payscale.com to way to find out what jobs are worth based on job title, location, company and experience. Advantages to using the site are targeted salary research, such as, how your salary compares with others who have the same job title and nuanced information on how individual skills can affect your salary. It also includes a comprehensive compensation review so job perks can also be added to the equation. The site is user-data-driven so you may want to limit the amount of personal information you supply.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide detailed, honest feedback Shannon Cleary’s situational question - “There is a philanthropic organization that I have applied to 2 jobs to over the last 10 months. I am about to apply for my third. After my last application, I had a phone interview. When I got the rejection email, I replied and asked for time to chat (with my interviewer) or suggestions for things to work on for my next application. I never heard back from her.  So my questions: Should I reach out directly to her and ask for coffee again OR just send in my application as directed by the job post?”

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, send it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

These segments are sponsored by Hack the Hidden Job Market Course, which starts November 1st. Visit the link above to lock in early bird pricing now.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: How To Follow Up After An Interview, with Jenny Foss


Mon, Aug 22, 2016


On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Jenny Foss, owner of JobJenny.com shares her tips for how to touch base with potential employers (without being a pest) after you’ve had your initial interview.   She reads “The Best Ways to Follow Up After The Interview”, her contribution to our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

Here are Jenny’s top tips to stay top-of-mind with employers:

  1. Know the next steps. Ask the employers about the process and timeline so you know the best way to follow-up.
  2. Send thank you notes. A simple, but often ignored way to be remembered, especially if you send them to the right people.
  3. Connect on LinkedIn. Create a reason to connect on LinkedIn so you can have ongoing dialog with the interviewer. Just don’t make rookie mistakes when you connect.
  4. Follow-up by email. Know when and how to reach out for updates.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 048: Ace a Job Interview with Body Language, with Vanessa Van Edwards


Wed, Aug 17, 2016


Did you know that your body language is responsible for 60% of your communications and that first impressions are nonverbal? Vanessa Van Edwards, from Science of People, shares some best practices for acing a job interview based on her team’s scientific research.    

Body language research shows us that the first thing an interviewer sees is called a ‘glance test.’ Humans used to use this first glance to determine if an approaching person was a friend or foe. It is an instinctive response we still use today, even though we may not be aware of it. To make the most out of our time in front of an interviewer Vanessa offers up these tips...

During a job interview applicants should:

  • Nail the first impression by using expansive body language and making their hands visible.
  • Shake the interviewer’s hand at the beginning and at the end of the interview.
  • Demonstrate competence by aligning your body with the interviewer's body, nod to show you are listening and speak naturally.
  • Use your portfolio or leave behind a document to open up an interviewer's closed body language.
  • End the interview with a lean-in handshake and good eye contact.
  • Walk side by side with the interviewer on your way out of the office.

If you feel like a winner and have a winner’s posture you will come across as a winner!

Vanessa Van Edwards Bio

Vanessa Van Edwards is a published author, behavioral investigator, and Huffington Post columnist. Her specialty is science-based people skills. Vanessa runs the Science of People, a Human Behavior Research lab and her unique approach has been featured on CNN, Forbes, NPR, BusinessWeek and in the Wall Street Journal. You can help further Vanessa’s research experiments by visiting the website and clicking on something that interests you.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

The free, online tool Apply Mate is Ben’s job research tool of the week. This tool allows job applicants to enter details about jobs which interest them and the Apply Mate database keeps track of the entire process in an intuitive and useful manner.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide detailed, honest feedback to answer Haley Twist’s question - “Should job hunters ever consider applying for positions they don’t necessarily want, but are qualified for, to get their foot in the door at a company they really respect?”

These segments are sponsored by Hack the Hidden Job Market Course, which starts November 1st. Visit the link above to lock in early bird pricing now.

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, send it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 047: How to Make Your Job Virtual, with Melissa Mathews


Wed, Aug 10, 2016


It pays off to prepare yourself before asking an employer to make your job virtual. Most employers will want to know what’s in it for them before allowing an employee to work from home full-time. A professional way to address your employer’s possible questions and concerns is to make a list of the objections you think they will have, and then build a mini business case around each issue. Showing an employer a value proposition is your quickest way to a yes.

Employers appreciate when you can show them:

  • How your productivity will be increased
  • How you plan to hold yourself accountable
  • How your creativity may be sparked
  • The absence of workplace distractions
  • Logistical cost savings

When your employer agrees to your proposal of setting up a virtual office, you need to start preparing yourself for success. Melissa says that it is best to be honest with your work style and be sure you can spend long periods alone. Also, you should not consider working from home a substitute for child care. If you want to continue working virtually, you should have other means for your child to be cared for during your work hours.

With focus and determination, you can do this!

Resources for virtual office information:

Melissa Mathews Bio

Melissa Mathews is the founder and president of The Mathews Group, a strategic communications agency built on an entirely virtual, flex-work model. The Mathews Group supports Fortune 100 corporate clients, with a team working from home offices, coffee shops, horse barns and soccer sidelines across the U.S. and international time zones. Melissa believes that if you hire great people and give them the freedom they need to live and work, they’ll exceed your expectations. Learn more at Mathews Group.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

This is a simple and free online tool which has revolutionized the ability to connect with people by email. Job seekers can use this tool to contact with hiring managers, to bypass Human Resource Departments or to make sure their email goes to the intended party. Email Address Verifier is very simple to use and allows the user to know if the email address is valid.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide detailed feedback to answer Eric Stachon’s question?“Is it possible to make a great second impression if your interview didn’t go as planned?”

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Hack the Hidden Job Market Course and Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question, send it to jenna@macslist.org or call her at 716-JOB-TALK. Or if you found a job resource you think everyone should know about, send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus Episode: An Unusual Interview Tactic


Mon, Aug 08, 2016


On February 4, 2016, the New York Times published an article, “Walt Bettinger of Charles Schwab: You’ve Got to Open Up to Move Up,” in which the CEO revealed a very interesting interview tactic. Before hiring an executive-level candidate, Bettinger takes them out to breakfast. The trick? He pre-arranges for the restaurant to mess up the food order so he can see how the candidate reacts.

What would you do if you were the candidate in this situation?

On this seven minute bonus episode, the Mac’s List team talks about the unorthodox interview tactic. From food allergies to how you want your potential boss to view you - Mac, Ben and Jenna cover it all.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com



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Ep. 046: How to Get a Job You Love, with Scott Barlow


Wed, Aug 03, 2016


Do you know how to get a job you love? It’s OK if you don’t. Most people do not believe it is even possible. A traditional job search includes scouring job postings and identifying with skills an employer is looking for. Today’s conversation turns the table on tradition and encourages job seekers to first identify and then search for a job they will love.

Guest, Scott Barlow uses putting a puzzle together as an analogy for identifying which type of job you will probably love.

Signature Strengths are your inherent qualities which give you a natural and unfair advantage over another person. These strengths can be seen as the corner pieces of the puzzle as they are easy to recognize. Identifying these strengths is the first step in the process of finding a job you love. To assist you in figuring out what your strengths are, try:

  1. StrengthsFinder 2.0 
  2. Get Feedback from those who know you well enough to give you a truthful answer to the question “What do I do well?”

The ideal work environment for you is a company which values the same things you do. Think about a workplace you would flourish in. These are the edge pieces of the puzzle, the framework of what you should be looking for when you search for a job. If you pre-identify the companies which closely match your ideal work environment, you can make contacts within the organizations before a job is posted online. You can place yourself first in line when a position becomes available.

Go after the things you are great at and focus on the things you place the most value in!

Scott Barlow Bio

Scott Barlow is the founder of Happen to Your Career, a company that helps you stop doing work that doesn’t fit, figuring out what does fit and then teaching you to make it happen. Scott has been helping people develop their careers and businesses for more than 10 years. Scott is also the host of the Happen to Your Career podcast.

Visit the Figure Out What Fits site to obtain the 8-day video series for creating career change. This is a FREE gift for Find Your Dream Job podcast listeners.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Apres Group is a community-based website for female professionals who have taken a career break and are looking to re-enter the workplace. The site is designed by Jennifer Gefsky and Niccole Kroll. The site’s resources include coaching, success stories and employers who are looking to hire. The site is free for women who want to register and perform job searches.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide detailed feedback to answer Leta Muncie’s question - “What is the general career path a person might have before becoming an Executive Director of a nonprofit?”

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). Now available in all formats!

If you would like the team to answer a job-related question send it to jenna@macslist.org. Or, if you found a job resource you think everyone should know about send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 045: An Introvert’s Guide to Networking, with Trina Isakson


Wed, Jul 27, 2016


Networking events can be, for an introvert, a worst case scenario. This is why introverts need to be prepared, strategic and have a clear goal of what they want to accomplish before attending a conference or event. Today’s guest expert, Trina Isakson says that introverts gain energy from being alone and a common misconception is to think of introverts as socially awkward or shy.

In business today, most networking events are designed around the ‘spray and pray’ method of handing out business cards to a copious amount of people. Introverts may see this exercise as a vampire slowly draining their energy levels, both mentally and physically. Trina shares her tips which allow an introvert to make the most out of a conference or live event. And, she reminds us the true goal of networking events should be to build meaningful relationships which add value to our lives and the lives of others.

Tips for introverts to get the most out of networking events:

  • Attend the same conference year after year
  • The conference topic must be interesting to you
  • Focus energy on building deep and meaningful connections
  • Identify people who can be a beneficial strategic connection
  • Be generous to those who hold less power than you
  • Have a purpose by volunteering for a position at the conference
  • Stay in touch with purpose

Trina stresses that quality contacts matter more than the quantity of contacts you make. Introverts who may feel they are bothering their newly made contacts can maintain a professional relationship with a quick email in place of a meeting.

Trina Isakson Bio

Trina is a strategist and researcher who works with nonprofit leaders and social innovators. As founder and principal thinker at 27 Shift, her clients include government, higher education, and national nonprofit organizations. She has also taught university courses on community development, leadership and management, and is the founder of the Quiet Changemaker Project, the Quiet Change Maker FB Group and the Do Good Better Podcast. Thank you, Trina, for contributing to this Introvert’s Guide to Networking podcast.

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

The Introvert Entrepreneur is the work of consultant, Beth Buelow. The site is designed to assist introverts by amplifying their strengths. The accompanying The Introvert Entrepreneur Podcast has been ranked one of the Top 10 Business Podcasts.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac provide their feedback to answer Jonathan Chambers’ question “How do I set myself apart from college grads when I have 7 years experience running a successful company but no paper degree yet?”

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). Now available in all formats!

If you would like the team to answer a job related question send it to jenna@macslist.org. Or, if you found a job resource you think everyone should know about send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo,www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS Episode: Networking Schmetworking, Tips for Genuine Connection, with Jen Violi


Mon, Jul 25, 2016


Freelance writer, Jen Violi, shares how to make genuine connections in Oregon - or anywhere.

Even if networking makes you queasy, you can make connections with others on a personal and professional level.  We say this at Mac's List all the time, 80% of jobs are never posted, so chances are you're next dream job will be found by networking with someone in your field.  

Check out Jen's simple tips for making connections in a new city--from volunteer opportunities to fiestas.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this shoe, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 044: How to Cope with a Job Loss with Marsha Warner


Wed, Jul 20, 2016


A job loss due to layoffs or conflicting interests can be a shock to our system. A person may feel thrilled to be apart from their previous employer at first but a flood of emotions generally follows shortly after. Today’s guest, Career Coach Marsha Warner, shares tips and techniques to transform your first days of unemployment.

If you find yourself in this situation Marsha advises:

  • Don’t start to market yourself for a new position immediately.
  • Take the necessary time to equalize your emotions.
  • Just breathe.
  • Be prepared to tell your story pragmatically and end it with a statement of moving forward.
  • Friends and family can serve as a much-needed support system.

Only after rectifying your emotions should you align yourself with possible new employers. Statistics from the Department of Labor anticipate each US worker will have six job changes from age 30 to age 55.  Understanding you may find yourself transitioning jobs more than once makes a good case for having a high-level, personal career plan. Taking personal responsibility for your skill set and keeping a larger perspective empowers you when your job search begins.

Remember to: Stay engaged with your existing networks! Take a class to enhance your skills!   

marshaMarsha Warner Bio

Marsha is the owner of Career Factors (www.careerfactors.com). She is a coach, resume writer, and recruiter. Her clients range from college students to senior executives. Marsha is a popular educator and speaker at career events and a frequent contributor to career blogs and podcasts. Thank you Marsha, for contributing to this How to Cope with a Job Loss podcast.

Jenna’s Find Your Dream Job Listener Question:

Ben, Jenna and Mac chime in to provide Jonathan Chambers expert advice when answering his question “How do I transition from being an entrepreneur to a 9-5 employee?”

Ben’s Job Search Resources:

Career One Stop (www.careeronestop.org) is a U.S. Department of Labor website designed specifically for the unemployed job seeker. The online tool  provides customized information for your specific situation and includes guides on how to file for unemployment benefits.

Mac’s Pro-Tip:

Unemployment benefits are NOT tax free. Set aside a portion of your earnings to offset the taxes due on April 15th.

These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). Now available in all formats!

If you would like the team to answer a job related question send it to jenna@macslist.org. If you found a job resource you think everyone should know about send it to ben@macslist.org and tell him how it has helped you find your dream job.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo,www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 043: How to Create Your Own Job Online, with Sean Ogle


Wed, Jul 13, 2016


Do you want to work at home?  Thanks to the Internet, jobs that used to require you to sit in an office can now be done online.  Our guest expert this week, Sean Ogle, teaches people to a make a living online.

Remote work opportunities can offer flexible or part-time schedules. And that can be important for people who need time for family or other interests.

But how do you get started? You can look for employers who hire online workers. Or you can create your own job.  Whether you’re an online freelancer or a corporate worker looking for a more flexible work arrangement, Sean’s tips will help you ideate, start and grow a profitable online business.

In this 30-minute episode you will learn:

  • How alternative career choices can provide a valuable income stream
  • How to overcome roadblocks like inconsistency, time management, and fear of launching
  • The three steps to launching an online business that makes money
  • How to find a mentor who will  help you grow
  • Why you don’t have to be an expert, just a relative expert (and what that really means).

This week’s guest:

Sean Ogle (Twitter | LinkedIn)
Owner, Location Rebel

Portland, Oregon

In 2009 Sean’s life sucked. So he quit his job, moved to Thailand, built a business, and started living life the way he’d always wanted. Location 180 documents the journey and teaches you how to do the same thing.

Listener question of the week:

  • Do you think it’s appropriate to change your job title on a resume? - Teresa Peltier

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: How to Ignite Your Professional Bio with a Killer First Sentence, with Mike Russell


Mon, Jul 11, 2016


Mike Russell, owner of Pivotal Writing, shares how to hook your readers attention with that first sentence of your professional bio.  We all know Portland loves quirky, colorful personalities, from “Keep Portland Weird” to “Keep Portland Beered” to “Keep Portland Bearded”.  Hiring managers are no different.  Whether it’s your bio statement on your website or your LinkedIn summary.  In this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Mike Russell shares his tips on how to make a strong first sentence to hook your reader’s attention right away.

If you’re looking for more advice on how to network, check out our book, Land Your Dream Job In Portland and Beyond. You’ll find everything you need to get a great job whether you’re in Portland Oregon, Portland Maine, or anywhere in-between. For more information on Land Your Dream Job In Portland and Beyond, visit macslist.org/book.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this shoe, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 042: How to Be Productive in Your Job Search, with Mike Vardy


Wed, Jul 06, 2016


 

Job hunting take a lot of time, energy, and attention to detail. It’s a job in-and-of-itself!  You might start your day reading several job boards. Then you complete and send a job application.  Next you email requests for informational meetings. And that’s followed by writing thank you notes.  After all that? Perhaps you have a job interview. But your day isn’t over. Your evening may include a networking event, too.

How do you juggle all this activity while keeping your energy and enthusiasm high? Above all, are you using your time as best you can?This week we’re talking with Mike Vardy, a productivity expert. He’ll share his best tips for how you can use your time to get the results you want.

In this 32-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why batching your time to specific tasks is key to productivity
  • Why “To Do” Lists might not be the best way to accomplish daily tasks
  • How to use a calendar effectively
  • How a Daily M.A.P. (Mode - Action - Project) can help you plan out your day
  • How digital trackers and analog journals can help you manage your daily plan.
  • Why reflective journaling is a key to increasing your daily productivity
  • Tips on how to avoid burnout through time management

This week’s guest:

Mike Vardy (Twitter | LinkedIn)
Owner, Productivityist

Victoria, BC, Canada

Mike Vardy is an author, speaker, and productivity and time management strategist (or 'productivityist') based out of Victoria, BC, Canada. His company is Productivityist, and the company's mission is to help people stop 'doing' productive and start 'being' productive through a variety of online and offline resources that he facilitates.

Listener question of the week:

  • I have some great experience in my industry, but I’m a graduating senior. How do I convince an employer that I’m worth a job and not an internship at their company? Should I apply to both positions (intern and a job position) or just the job position? - Hannah Alkad

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!


Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 041: What to Do After a Job Interview, with Deena Pierott


Wed, Jun 29, 2016


We talked in an earlier show about what you can do to prepare for and nail a job interview. But what happens next after you’ve impressed your interviewers?  The steps you take next can make the difference between getting a job offer or a terse rejection letter.

This week we’re talking about what you need to do after you leave the interview room.

Our guest this week is Deena Pierott, founder and CEO of Mosaic Blueprint. Deena provides recruitment and on-boarding services for employers, and she knows what companies are looking for in candidates. She discusses what you can do after your in-person interview to improve your chances of landing the job.

In this 33-minute episode you will learn:

  • Unusual ways that organizations determine whether you are a good fit for the office culture
  • Why you absolutely must send a handwritten thank you note after your interview
  • How many times you should follow-up after an interview
  • Why you need a champion and advocate within the organization
  • The fine line between being persistent and being a pest
  • How to get feedback when you didn’t get the job

This week’s guest:

Deena Pierott (@deenapierott | LinkedIn)
Recruiting, Onboarding, Diversity, and Inclusion Consultant
Owner, Mosaic Blueprint
Portland, Ore.

Deena Pierott is the CEO of Mosaic Blueprint, a boutique firm that specializes in recruiting and on-boarding, multicultural communications, outplacement services and career counseling. She is also the founder of iUrban Teen and has been named a champion of change by the White House and included in Ebony Magazine’s Power 100 list.

Listener question of the week: 

  • A prospective employer has asked for references from my last three jobs. The problem is, I haven’t told my current boss that I’m looking for other work. Should I tell my boss now--even though the new job isn’t 100% in the bag--or ask the prospective employer to not contact my current place of work?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Bonus: Mac's Interview on the Non Profit Hour


Mon, Jun 27, 2016


Many job seekers are interested in a nonprofit career as a vehicle for rewarding, socially-impactful work. But landing a nonprofit job isn’t easy. Competition is fierce – particularly for the most desirable positions. And the nonprofit sector itself is sometimes quite insular, with the the most plum jobs going to well-connected candidates.

Finding a nonprofit job requires a strategic approach, solid networking, and a clear understanding of what you have to offer social impact organizations.

On February 28, 2016 Mac Prichard, founder and publisher of Mac’s List, explored these issues on the Non Profit Hour, a radio program produced by the Portland-based Media Institute for Social Change. Mac discussed the history of Mac’s List, the unique challenges of finding rewarding work, and his own experience as a job seeker.

He also shared some of his favorite work-themed music. (Spoiler alert: Mac loves Dolly Parton!)

In this bonus episode you will learn:

  • Why connection is the key – organizations hire candidates they know trust
  • How to recognize and communicate the value of what you have to offer others
  • Why online job boards are only a small part of the job hunt
  • How hiring is a two way street – for the potential employee and the employer

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 040: How To Make A Living as a Musician, with Mark Powers


Wed, Jun 22, 2016


You don’t need to live in Los Angeles or have a hit song to have a successful career in music.  Across the country, tens of thousands of people make good livings as musicians and singers, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.  And the federal government predicts the number of such jobs will go up in the years ahead.

The pay can be good, too. The average wage for musicians was almost $50,000 a year in 2015.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we explore how you can build a great career in the music industry. Our guest, Mark Powers, is a professional drummer who knows all about how to make a living in music. Mark shares his experience building a career as a performer, writer, and music educator. His advice to aspiring artists: create your own opportunities through diversification and building good relationships.

In this 29-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why diversification is the key to success in a music career
  • The importance of ROCK: Repetition, Opportunity, Commitment, and Karma
  • Why music royalties are a small (but important) part of the income model for musicians
  • Why you should put yourself in situations where you are the “weak link”
  • How to build an online presence as a musician

This week’s guest:

Mark Powers (@MarkPowers | LinkedIn)
Percussion Artist and Educator
Author, I Want to a Drummer
Owner, PowersPercussion.com and DrumItInAMinute.com
Portland, Ore.

Percussion artist and educator Mark Powers has shared the stage with everyone from Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen, Devon Evans (of Bob Marley and the Wailers), and the Rolling Stones saxophonist Tim Ries. Mark now offers video drum lessons on his educational website, DrumItInAMinute.com. He is the author of several percussion textbooks and a past contributor to Modern Drummer Magazine.

Fun fact: Mark is a former co-holder of the Guinness World Record for Longest Drum Roll by a Group.

Listener question of the week:

  • I love music - but I’m not musically talented.  What sort of jobs are out there in the musical field for me?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 039: How to Start Over in a New City, with Terry St. Marie


Wed, Jun 15, 2016


Have you ever thought about putting everything you own into a moving van and taking a new job in a new city?

The typical American moves 11.7 times in a lifetime. From across town to across the country, you’ll face common challenges with job hunting and settling in a new city.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we talk about how to kickstart your career in a new city. Our guest is Terry St. Marie, who knows all about starting over. In the midst of a successful business career, Terry made the big jump from the the East Coast to the West Coast in 2011.  He’ll share his best tips for building rebuilding a career--and a professional network--from scratch.

In this 41-minute episode you will learn:

  • How to create a community after you move to a new place
  • How to research new locations and opportunities to determine where you should move
  • Networking tips for out-of-staters, from LinkedIn to email
  • Why shared connections - from sports teams to donut preferences - can help build connections and strengthen relationships
  • How a city’s culture affects the way you network
  • How making an effort and putting yourself out there will help you secure an informational interview

This week’s guest:

Terry “Starbucker” St. Marie (Twitter | LinkedIn)

Co-Founder, BuiltOregon.com

Portland, Ore.

Terry “Starbucker” St. Marie is a writer, consultant, entrepreneur and startup investor living in Portland, Oregon. Before moving to the Rose City in 2010, he had a successful 23 year tenure as an executive in the cable television industry.  Terry has extensive experience in business operations, customer care, strategy and financial management. For the past 10 years he has also published a popular blog featuring his “More Human” leadership philosophy, TerryStarbucker.com, and was recently cited by Inc. Magazine as one of the “Top 100 Leadership and Management Experts”. He’s also the co-founder and publisher of the online media company focused on Oregon entrepreneurs, BuiltOregon.com, which launched in December 2014. Terry is also an investor in the Oregon Angel Fund, and is on the boards of the Oregon Entrepreneurs Network, and Social Venture Partners Portland.

Listener question of the week:

  • I’m moving to a new city for a job.  Any tips on how to make sure my professional life doesn’t completely take over my personal life?

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!


Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: Three Tips to Thrive in the Transition from College to Career, with Satya Byock


Mon, Jun 13, 2016


You’ve survived years of schooling, finals, group projects and finally have a hard-earned degree in your hands.  You’re still looking for full-time work and your career route is an open road in front of you.  While catching your breath, you get this question, “What are you going to do with your life?”  It’s an overwhelming question for mid-career professionals.

So how do you answer that question just a few weeks after graduation?

Satya Byock, founder of Quarter-Life Consulting has three tips for you to thrive during your transition from college to career.

If you’re looking for more advice on how to network, check out our book, Land Your Dream Job In Portland and Beyond. You’ll find everything you need to get a great job whether you’re in Portland Oregon, Portland Maine, or anywhere in-between. For more information on Land Your Dream Job In Portland and Beyond, visit macslist.org/book.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this shoe, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 038: How to Write a Killer Cover Letter, with Susan Rich


Wed, Jun 08, 2016


Google the words “cover letter” and you will find lots of opinions on the best tactics: which format to use, the right salutations, and to whom you should address your letter.

Our guest expert this week, Susan Rich, author of How to Write a Kick-Butt Resume Cover Letter, says people are missing the most important point of all: an employer has a problem that needs to be solved.  The applicant who shows she or he can solve problem has a huge advantage. Susan shares her advice how to focus your thoughts into to key talking points that address the employer’s needs. A dynamite headline and a powerfully structured cover letter showcases your skills in a way that is uniquely appealing to employers looking for help.

In this 26-minute episode you will learn:

  • How to frame job seeking as a business transaction
  • Why being a problem solver is the key to your job search
  • How to organize your thoughts to focus in on your key points for a cover letter
  • The elements of a strong cover letter headline
  • How to structure a cover letter that actually gets read

This week’s guest:

Susan Rich (Twitter | LinkedIn)

Author, How to Write a Kick-Butt Resume Cover Letter

Portland, Ore.

Susan Rich deliver results, not promises. People call her an idea refinery, always creating a new way forward. She is widely recognized for her strategic business and marketing savvy, her internal & external communications strategies. She is an expert speaker and trainer, and professional journalist with more than one million words in print.

Listener question of the week:

  • “With email as the primary form of application these days, how formal do cover letters need now?  Do I still need to include the employer’s address?” - Beckie

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!
Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 037: Three Steps to Take in Any Job Negotiation, with Jeff Weiss


Wed, Jun 01, 2016


This week on Find Your Dream Job, we’re talking about negotiation, a vital skill, especially at work. Maybe you’re considering a job offer. Perhaps  you’re about to ask for a raise. Or you’re chasing a  promotion. Whatever your ask, it will require negotiating.

Many people treat negotiations as a win-or-lose situation for the parties involved. If you get what what you want, it’s at someone else’s expense.

It doesn’t have to be this way.  We speak with Jeff Weiss, author of the Harvard Business Review’s “Guide to Negotiating.” Jeff will share his tips for how you can move from a game of concessions and compromises.   He’ll also talk about how to use collaboration and creativity so that you get better results and good working relationships with others.

In this 32-minute episode you will learn:

  • The three negotiating mistakes most people make
  • The questions you should ask when you’re told “no”
  • The importance of understanding “why” you want a raise
  • How to find creative solutions and compromises in your negotiations
  • Why systematic preparation is key to great negotiating - from asking for a raise to managing contractors.

This week’s guest:

Jeff Weiss (Twitter | LinkedIn)

Author, Harvard Business Review’s Guide to Negotiating

Cambridge, Mass.

Jeff Weiss is a founding partner of Vantage Partners, a Boston-based consulting firm that works with Fortune 500 companies on improving how they negotiate.  Jeff has published extensively on negotiation is the author of the “Harvard Business Review Guide to Negotiating”.  He is also a member of the faculty of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. In July 2016, Jeff will become the ninth president of Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Listener question of the week:

  • “When should you bring up salary when interviewing?” - Ben

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: Let's Have Coffee... Online, with Joshua Waldman


Mon, May 30, 2016


Networking and coffee often go hand-in-hand; inviting a professional contact out for coffee is one of the easiest ways to score an informational interview or stay in touch with your network.

Chances are, before anyone accepts your coffee invite they are going to check out you out on social media. So it is vital that your social media profiles are a true reflection of who you are as a professional.

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Joshua Waldman, author of Job Searching with Social Media for Dummies and founder of Career Enlightenment, shares his advice on how to keep your online presence and profiles up-to-date and professional during your job search.

His top tips? On top of having a stellar LinkedIn profile, consider giving your new contact more information about yourself with a simple About.me website.

If you’re looking for more advice on how to network, check out our book, Land Your Dream Job In Portland and Beyond. You’ll find everything you need to get a great job whether you’re in Portland Oregon, Portland Maine, or anywhere in-between. For more information on Land Your Dream Job In Portland and Beyond, visit macslist.org/book.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this shoe, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 036: Why You Should Quit Your Job Now, with Tess Vigeland


Wed, May 25, 2016


Ever think about quitting your job? A vast majority of people do. One survey cited by CBS News found that 84% of Americans want to switch employers. Yet most of us show up for work every Monday even when we want to be somewhere else.

There are many reasons we don’t quit our job--even jobs that make us unhappy. Top concerns people cite include: family, money and opportunity.   But what if you walked out of your office today without lining up your next job? Does that sound crazy?

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we speak to author Tess Vigeland, who makes a case for why you should quit your job now - even if you don’t have a “Plan B.”

In this 34-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why leaving a dream job might be the best move you can possibly make
  • How to know when it’s time to quit your job
  • How to review, understand, and present your employable skills
  • How to discover who you are outside of your traditional career role

This week’s guest:

Tess Vigeland (Twitter | LinkedIn)

Author, Leap: Leaving a Job with No Plan B to Find the Career and Life You Really Want

SE Asia

Listener question of the week:

  • “How does one brand themselves in the midst of a career / industry transition?” - Chris

Be sure to leave a comment on our Facebook page to be entered to win a special prize!  If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!


Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 035: Help Your Teen Find Their Life Purpose, with Dearbhla Kelly


Wed, May 18, 2016


It’s graduation season and a time to celebrate the great accomplishments of our graduating high school students. It’s also a time for those students to make some big decisions about their future. Should they continue their education? Enter the workforce? Take a gap year? Or perhaps sign-up for service?

“What to do next” is  a big question and one that can causes teenagers and parents a lot of stress. It’s also choice on many people’s minds as graduation season nears.

This week on Find Your Dream Job podcast, we talk about how to help teens choose what to do after high school so that they build a solid foundation for their career. Our guest is Dearbhla Kelly, author of Career Coach, a book to help parents and teens with career planning for young people.

In this 31-minute episode you will learn:

  • How influential parents are on career choice for teens
  • Why parents need to guide (not lead) teens when it comes to career management skills
  • How open ended questions can help teens make good career choices
  • The importance of informational interviews, job shadowing, volunteering, and career day opportunities

This week’s guest:

Dearbhla Kelly (Twitter | LinkedIn)
Career Coach
Author, Career Coach
Dublin, Ireland

Listener question of the week:

  • “How do you stay challenged in your job while helping others?” - Cheryl Curry

Don’t forget to leave your question (or comment) on Mac’s List Facebook page!  If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!


Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: How to Pick the Right Interview Outfit


Mon, May 16, 2016


When it comes to interviews, your wardrobe matters.

You want to pick the perfect outfit for your interview--one that is professional, but which also honors the existing office culture that you hope to join. Doing so creates a good first impression with the hiring manager and signals that you might be a good fit for the organization. 

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Cecilia Bianco, former community manager at Mac's List, shares her advice on picking the right interview outfit. Learn the do's and don'ts of professional attire, as well as tips for customizing your outfit to accomodate the organization's internal culture.

If you're looking for more advice on how to ace your interview, check out our book, Land Your Dream Job In Portland and Beyond. You'll find everything you need to get a great job whether you're in Portland Oregon, Portland Maine, or anywhere in-between. For more information on Land Your Dream Job In Portland and Beyond, visit macslist.org/book.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this shoe, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 034: How to Identify Your Ideal Career, with Hallie Crawford


Wed, May 11, 2016


Are you happy at your job? Unfortunately, most people aren’t. According to Gallup, unhappy employees outnumber happy ones, two to one.

There are many reasons people end up with jobs they don’t like. Some workers take the first job offered in order to pay bills. Others stick with an employer because they aren’t clear what they want to do next. And some worry if they say no to a job offer another one won’t come.

What would it take for you to be happy in your career? This week on Find Your Dream Job we explore this issue with career expert Hallie Crawford. Hallie shares strategies for finding your professional calling and tips for taking control of your career.

In this 26-minute episode you will learn:

  • Career fulfillment: what it means and how you can achieve it
  • Tools you can use to pick a career you’ll love
  • How fulfillment plays a key role in your professional career
  • Why you should listen to your gut when making career decisions
  • How a career contrast list can help you focus on your career path
  • The eight elements of the ideal career model to identify your career values

This week’s guest:

Hallie Crawford (@halliecrawford | LinkedIn)
Certified Career Coach and Job Search Expert
Founder, Create Your Career Path
Atlanta, GA

Listener question of the week:

  • What is the difference between a resume and a CV?  Which one is appropriate to use when job hunting?

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 033: How to Work a Room, with Susan RoAne


Wed, May 04, 2016


Maybe you’re looking for your next job. Or perhaps you want to stay on top of your career. Whatever your goal, you know you need to go to professional events.  It’s one of the best ways to meet others in your field.

But does the idea of walking into a room of strangers and striking up a conversation fill you with horror? This is a common fear many jobseekers have—and it keeps them from making vital professional connections.

This week on Find Your Dream we’re talking about how to work a room, with an expert on the subject, Susan RoAne. Susan’s best-selling book, How to Work a Room, teaches you everything you need to know to become an expert networker.

In this 26-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why face-to-face networking is still happening in the digital age
  • The difference between working a room and networking
  • Why showing up is key to a positive personal brand image
  • How customizable introductions are key to making connections at events
  • Why ice breakers and small talk are valuable forms of communication

This week’s guest:

Susan RoAne (@susanroane | LinkedIn)

Author, How To Work a Room

San Francisco, Calif.

Listener question of the week: 

How can I support my friend during their job hunt?

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS Episode: Hello College Student, I’m Talking to You! with Gabrielle Nygaard


Mon, May 02, 2016


The question every college student dreads but can't avoid: "What are you going to do after graduation?"

It's graduation season and university students across the country are preparing for the next phase of their lives. For most, that means a job--or at least a job search. Others may explore graduate school or an alternative learning experience. Regardless of what's next, this transition can be a time of great stress for new graduates. 

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, we share tips on how to smooth the transition from college to "real life." Gabrielle Nygaard, a Fulbright Scholar and Linfield College graduate, reads "Hello College Student, I’m Talking to You!", her contribution to our book Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this shoe, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

 



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Ep. 032: How to Get the Career You Want with Katie Kelley


Wed, Apr 27, 2016


Every time you switch jobs, you have the opportunity to redefine your career—to pursue new challenges and find new meaning in your work life.

Most workers have ample opportunity to change career paths; the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates the typical American will have 10 different jobs before the age of 40.  Yet many of us struggle to make the big choice of changing professional direction.

Knowing what you want to do in life often means conquering your fears. You may have to shed old ideas. Or find the strength to let go of a safe job. Put simply… it takes courage.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we’re talking about how you can plan your career instead of letting just happen to you. Mac talks with Katie Kelley, an executive coach, motivational speaker, and author of the new book, Career Courage.  Katie shares her tips on how to discover your passion, step out of your comfort zone and create the career success you want.

In this 33-minute episode you will learn:

  • How the FOG (Feedback – Opportunities – Gut Instinct) model helps you make career decisions
  • What you should stop, start and continue doing in your career
  • How to evaluate other careers that interest you
  • What the “career success circle” looks like and how it can point to your next steps
  • How to reflect on career plateaus and move forward from them
  • Why permission to be different is the key to having career courage

This week’s guest:

Katie Kelley (@katie_c_kelley | LinkedIn)
Professional Mentor
Author of Career Courage
Portland, Ore.

Listener question of the week: 

  • When it comes to creating (or updating) my resume do I really need to include my home address?

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!


Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 031: Sell Your Ideas, Not Your Skills (Larry Smith)


Wed, Apr 20, 2016


To have a great career, you need passion. But you also need a solid plan.  Specifically, you need to know how your passions and ideas will be marketable in an ever-evolving job market.

This week on “Find Your Dream Job” we’re talking about career management and how to build a plan for a remarkable long-term career. Mac interviews professor and author Larry Smith, whose provocative TED talk, “Why You Will Fail to Have a Great Career,” has attracted more than six million views. Larry urges his students to explore their passions--but also to think about their ongoing relevance in the job market.

In this 35-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why passion is a prerequisite to a great career--but not enough in-and-of-itself.
  • How to market yourself and your ideas
  • How to discipline your passion as part of your overall career management plan
  • Why everyone needs a 50 years career management plan
  • Why even non-creative professionals need to be creative when managing their career

This week’s guest:

Larry Smith
Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Waterloo
Author, No Fears, No Excuses: What You Need to Do to Have a Great Career
Waterloo, ON, Canada

 

Listener question of the week: 

  • Everyone tells me to “do what I love” for a job. But how am I supposed to know if I like something before I do it? There are so many different jobs out there. I feel like I will be limiting myself if I pick a direction too early in life!

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: Lessons Learned By The Recently Unemployed (Marsha Warner)


Mon, Apr 18, 2016


All too often people only think about career management when they are actively looking for a job. This is a big mistake! Ongoing, proactive career management while you are employed can pay huge dividends next time you are looking for work. Don't wait to lay the foundation for your next job search!

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Marsha Warner, owner of Portland-based Career Factors, shares professional regrets she's heard from her clients. She reads “Lessons Learned By The Recently Unemployed”, her contribution to our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

Avoid future regret! Here are Marsha's tips for help you prepare for your next job search:

  • Keep your own file of reviews and accolades
  • Don’t wait until you’re unemployed to start networking
  • Keep your LinkedIn profile active
  • When your job ends, take time to mourn the loss and acknowledge your emotions, then let it go
  • Teaching is a great source of career satisfaction
  • Proactive career management means stepping up to a challenge

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!  

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

Transcript

Mac Prichard:

This is Find Your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac's List. On today's bonus episode we're sharing exclusive content from our new book. Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond) compiles all of our best job search tips and career management tools into one simple, easy-to-read guide. It's the definitive tool kit for anyone looking for meaningful work. The book also includes special contributions from an array of job search experts and today you'll hear from one of them.

Here's Marsha Warner, owner of Career Factors, reading her contribution Lesson Learned By the Recently Unemployed.

Marsha Warner:

Recently, a client shared what he wished he'd done before he found himself on the job hunt. Here's a list of best practices for career maintenance that are applicable to everyone.

He said, "I wish I'd kept of copy of my performance reviews." Lesson: Keep your own file of reviews and accolades. They are helpful to promote accomplishment statement, review for interviews and remind yourself of achievements when doubts creep in.

He said, "I wish I'd continued to network and develop outside contacts." Lesson: Don't wait until you're unemployed to start networking. Stay in touch with colleagues, classmates, ex-bosses, other parents, fellow volunteers, and so on.

He said, "I wish I'd joined LinkedIn earlier on." Lesson: Keep your LinkedIn profile active. It's a tool for recruiters, a way to stay connected and a source of information for professional development. Spend at least an hour a week updating your profile, reconnecting, joining interest groups and staying current.

He said, "I wish I had not taken it so personally. I let this lay-off really get to me." Lesson: When your job ends, take time to mourn the loss and acknowledge your emotions, then let it go. Evaluate the job market, then take up your career toolbox, and go forth. Know that when you're part of a reduction in force, it's a business decision not a personal decision. Take charge of your career with a personal marketing plan. Manage what you can control, and let what you cannot go.

He said, "I wish I had reached out and passed on my professional knowledge to younger colleagues before I left." Lesson: Teaching is a great source of career satisfaction. Some companies have formal programs for knowledge transfer. Seek them out. The effort will be worth the reward you'll feel in sharing your knowledge with others.

He said, "I wish I had paid more attention to my own development and taken advantage of challenges that would give me more exposure." Lesson: Proactive career management means stepping up to a challenge. Volunteering for projects and committees or getting trained for new skills are ways to grow. They'll get you noticed by your boss and bring greater satisfaction to your daily work. Ask yourself at the end of each day, what did I learn today?

He said, "I wish I'd ask for help early on in my job search. Things have changed so much, I feel a bit lost." Lesson: Feeling isolated and lost is common. A career coach can offer expert information and advice about the job market and how to put your best foot forward. Portland is blessed with great career resources including local colleges, private coaches and job search support groups. Help is available. Be wise, and ask for it.

Mac Prichard:

If you're looking for more expert advice and insider tips like what you just heard, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). You'll find everything you need to get a great job whether you're in Portland, Oregon, Portland, Maine, or anywhere in between. The 2016 edition includes new content, and for the first time ever, it's available in paperback, as well as in an array of e-reading devices including Kindle, Nook and iBooks. For more information on Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond) visit macslist.org/book.



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Ep. 030: Find the Work You’re Meant to Do (Chris Guillebeau)


Wed, Apr 13, 2016


Do you know someone who has the perfect job and is getting well paid, too? It might seem that this happened by stroke of luck. In fact, it has nothing do with chance.

People with dream jobs have clear goals and plans to accomplish them.  And when you find that job or career, it feels so right, it’s like you were born to do it.

But to get there you must first choose among what can seem like an overwhelming menu of career options.

This week on “Find Your Dream Job” we’re talking about how to find the work you were meant to do. I talk to Chris Guillebeau, author of the new book, “Born for This: How to Find the Work You Were Meant to Do.”

In this 35-minute episode you will learn:

  • How knowing your personality traits can help you find a job that plays to your natural strengths
  • Why it helps people think as an entrepreneur
  • Why making mistakes and taking risks is part of a successful career
  • What “working conditions” are and how they help you find your career path
  • How joy, money, and flow matter when figuring out your career goals
  • Why asking “Did today matter” is an important tool for evaluating your career

This week’s guest:

Chris Guillebeau (@ChrisGuillebeau)
Entrepreneur
Portland, Ore. 

Listener question of the week: 

My ultimate career goal is to own my own business. I’m not ready to make the jump now, so I’ve been interviewing for positions at established firms. Should I share this goal with prospective employers? Will it make me look like I’m not dedicated to the job?

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com

 

Full Transcript

Mac Prichard:

This is Find Your Dream Job. A podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want, and make a difference in life. I’m Mac Prichard, your host, and publisher of Mac’s List. Do you know someone who has the perfect job and is getting well paid too? It might seem that this happened by a stroke of luck. In fact, it has nothing to do with chance. People with dream jobs have clear goals and plans to accomplish them. When you find that job or career, it feels so right it’s like you were born to do it. To get there, you must first choose among what can seem like an overwhelming menu of career options.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we’re talking about how to find the work you were meant to do. Ben Forstag has a free online test that can help you get clearer about your goals and your strengths. Jenna Forstrom has a question from a listener who wants to start a business one day but wonders how candid she should be with employers about this. I talk to Christ Guillebeau, author of the new book Born For This: How to Find the Work You Were Meant to Do. Our show is brought to you by our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. To learn more about the updated edition that we published on February 1st, go to macslist.org/book.

We’re excited to have Jenna Forstrom, our new Community Manager, join us here in the Mac’s List studio. Jenna, welcome aboard.

Jenna Forstrom:

Thanks. I’m excited to be here.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, it’s terrific to have you not only on the podcast, but I know listeners who go to the website will be seeing on the blog and people here in Oregon will be seeing you at community events. I got to ask Jenna, because I know our listeners are curious, why did you want to work at Mac’s List?

Jenna Forstrom:

I started to want to work at Mac’s List a couple years ago when I was looking for a job and my friends recommended it as a resource. I’ve been using it for the last couple years doing freelance work and apply for jobs and it’s just a really great website and resource. I think that it’s amazing because of the people behind it that put in all the love and passion. When you and me were speaking about the opportunity, it just seemed like a natural place for me to show up and I want to help make it great too.

Mac Prichard:

It’s a pleasure to have you here. You bring to the job so many great skills and experiences but I think you really put your finger on it. It’s the fact that you’re part of the Mac’s List community that I think is a very special asset. Welcome to the studio and welcome to the show, and we look forward to working with you in the months ahead.

I also want to say thank you to the four career experts who filled in as our special co-host during the last two months. Those people are Aubrie DeClerk, Dawn Rasmussen, Jenny Voss, and Michelle Hynes. All four are nationally recognized experts and they are very busy people. I’m grateful to each of them for making the time to join us on one or more of the last seven episodes to answer questions from you, our listeners. If you haven’t done so, please check out the websites of these exceptional people. We’ll be sure to include links to their pages in the show notes.

Ben Forstag:

Hey Mac, Ben here.

Mac Prichard:

Hey Ben, how are you?

Ben Forstag:

I’m doing great. One of our most popular episodes on the podcast was Aubrie DeClerk on how listeners can get clear about what they want from work. You know Aubrie has been a frequent guest on the podcast and she was also a contributor to our book.

Mac Prichard:

Yes, she was. Her podcast actually is our second most popular episode. The topic, you may recall Ben, was how to get clear about what you want. This is a topic that comes up a lot when we talk to listeners. People who do dive into our book will find a couple of key topics that can help. There is information about how you can do the analytical work you need to do to be clear about goal setting. Tools like strength finders and what color’s your parachute. There are also, in the book, tips about how to get to know yourself and your strengths and your challenges. Tips about why you need to pay attention to your emotions and how to build a community. These are all things that can again help you get clear about what you want to do with your career.

Jenna, Ben, when in your careers have you two felt like you were doing something that you were born to do?

Ben Forstag:

I think like a lot of people, there are days or periods in any job I’ve had where I felt like this is perfect. I know exactly what I’m doing. I’m on top of this. I feel in control. The one experience where I felt like that was kind of always the case was way back in the beginning of my career when I worked as an outdoor education facilitator for a YMCA camp. I put so much energy in respecting the traditions of that summer camp. It just felt like a very special place to be and I was really invested in the job.

Mac Prichard:

I’ve had that experience a number of times. I’m actually having it right now running both Mac’s List and Prichard Communications. Throughout my career, I’ve really felt like I was doing my best work when the things that are expert. This week we’ll talk about joy, work, and flow all lined up. In other words, there were jobs I had where it was just a pleasure to go to work. I had the skills and the experiences that allowed me to thrive in that position and I just was experienced in what the psychologist called flow. That state of mind where you lose yourself in the task that you’re involved in. For me, in addition to the work I’m doing now, it’s happened on political campaigns, it happened when I was working for a human rights organization early in my career. It’s a very pleasant state to be in. How about you Jenna?

Jenna Forstrom:

When a job feels like it was a great fit and you were born for it, it’s when it plays to your strengths. For me, that comes into play because I feel like my strengths are being on the fly and being creative under pressure. When I volunteer at Night Strike and we have bumps in the road, we can’t find the keys to the trailer, that’s where it’s like I kind of step up and get animated and I’m like, okay we’re going to problem solve this. You guys go find the peanut butter and jelly and we’ll just focus on that while the leadership figures out the solution. How do we get keys or how do we break the lock to get into the trailer. Small problems that come up and hiccups is when I feel like that’s my strength. I think I learned that when I was a lifeguard when I was like 15. You’re managing a pool and something happens, you have to direct people to different locations to take care of an incident.

Mac Prichard:

Jenna, do you want to talk a little bit about Night Strike and your work there?

Jenna Forstrom:

Sure, on top of being a community manager here at Mac’s List, I volunteer every Thursday night with a program called Night Strike. Which is an urban humanitarian group here in Portland, for those of you who don’t know but hopefully you are interested in moving to Portland or you live here. We have a huge homeless crisis so we do immediate felt needs.

Mac Prichard:

Thanks for sharing that.

Jenna Forstrom:

Yeah.

Mac Prichard:

Let’s move onto Ben who every week brings us a resource that you all can use. Ben, I know you’ve been looking diligently around the internet for the last seven days. What have you found?

Ben Forstag:

In the past, we’ve talked about different ways to help people get clear about what they want. You mentioned Aubrie’s episode earlier, and I believe in that episode, my resource was the strengths finder test. Which is a book you can buy. One of the other well-known tests out there to help you find out what your natural strengths are or what your personality type is, is the Myers Briggs Personality Test, also called the Myers Briggs Type Indicator or MBTI. My resource this week is actually a free version of this test that you can do online and it’s available at www.16personalities.com and that’s 16 with one-six, not written out like a word. The name of this site actually comes from the MBTI itself, which speculates that there are 16 basic personality types out there.

The science behind the MBTI is actually pretty old. It originally comes from the work of Karl Jung who is a psychoanalyst back at the turn of the century. It stipulates basically that there are four general preferences that determine your personality type. Those are mind, how you interact with your environment. That’s whether you’re an introvert or extrovert. Energy, which is where you direct you mental energy. That basically is are you guided by intuition or observation. Nature, how you make decisions and cope with emotions. In layman’s terms that’s are you a thinking person or are you a feeling person? Then tactics, how you approach work, planning, and decision making. Are you a prospector or a judger? This test is about 30 different questions and it presents a bunch of questions and you answer across a continuum of strongly agree to strongly disagree about whether the question pertains to you.

It’s a lot of interesting questions. Questions that you might not ask yourself on a regular basis. I wrote down a few of the ones that I really like such as, for you is being right more important than being cooperative when it comes to teamwork? Or, do your dreams tend to focus on real world and its events? Or, as a parent would you rather see your child grow up kind or grow up smart? You have to pick one or the other here on a spectrum.

I took the test. It takes about twelve minutes. The result I got was that I am an INFP, which means I’m an introverted intuition feeling perceiving person. What the MBTI says is a mediator. I’ll be honest, this doesn’t feel like me. I don’t think that I’m introverted, or a super feeling person. What do you think, Mac?

Mac Prichard:

That sounds right to me. Ben, I know we’ve only worked together for seven months now but I see you, as somebody who smooth’s the waters.

Ben Forstag:

Okay, far be it from me to question an online personality test.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah.

Jenna Forstrom:

I took the test as well and got ENFP which is extroverted intuition feeling and then perceiving. I think that was a pretty good summary of me because I’m extremely outgoing.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah, I think the extroverted piece really speaks to you.

Jenna Forstrom:

I think it does great for our roles because we balance each other out.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah, and I think that brings up an interesting point here. There’s no normative stance on whether a personality type is good or bad. I think most people who look at these things would say for any organization, you need people who compliment one another. Right?

Jenna Forstrom:

Yeah.

Ben Forstag:

My introverted nature compliments your extroverted nature and vice versa. I think what this test really gets at is there are going to be certain types of roles or responsibilities or jobs that your personality type is going to fit into. You might do better at an organization that’s more hierarchical or one that has less organization around it. You want to find a job that fits that type of personality. The one real cool thing about this site is not only is it free but it produces a really comprehensive write up about each personality type and how that personality type might impact your life from relationships to parenthood to your career. It provides situations and strategies for specific roles that fit your personality type. Definitely worth taking a look at. Probably spend an hour doing this, or you can spend just twelve minutes and get the baseline information. Real good site, real great resource. The website is www.16personalities.com. That’s 1-6 personalities dot com.

Mac Prichard:

Thank you, Ben. If you have an idea for Ben, we’d love to hear from you. You can email him. His address is ben@macslist.org.

Now it’s time to hear from you, our listeners. Our community manager Jenna Forstrom joins us to answer one of your questions. Jenna, what do you hear from the community this week?

Jenna Forstrom:

This week our question is, “My ultimate career goal is to own my own business. I’m not ready to make that jump now so I’ve been interview positions at established firms. Should I share this goal with perspective employers or will this make me look like I’m not dedicated to the job?” I think that’s a great question. I think it also depends a lot on what kind of work you’re looking for. We know that the typical job length is four and half years for any person. Companies know when they hire people that they’re probably not going to stay forever. Also, they want to hire people that will last a little while. Like a year or two. If you’re looking to start a job within the next six months to a year and you just want a job to pay your bills, pay rent, maybe not share that information. I think if you’re looking to really gain a lot of information and grow into an organization, then maybe take that as a springboard platform, sharing that with hiring manager. Or maybe once you’ve gotten the role, find a mentor who’s maybe doing something on the side or something similar. I think that’s super acceptable.

Ben Forstag:

Most organizations I think when they make a hire know that they’re not hiring you for life and that you have bigger aspirations at some point. I think it’s fair to say, well like down the road in five years I was thinking maybe I’d like to start my own business, to an employer. I think that actually could speak well to you as a candidate, saying that you have an entrepreneurial attitude, that you can take calculated risks, that you want to take responsibility on for things. I think it’s all about timing. Are you looking to cover rent for the next year or are you going into this opportunity at hand with really an intent to see through your commitments and honor those commitments and your bigger picture of creating your own business is down the road some place?

Mac Prichard:

Good advice. Thank you Jenna and if you have a question for Jenna, you can email her. Her address is jenna@macslist.org. These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. We made our book even better. We added new content and now we’re offering it in the format you told us you wanted. For the first time ever, you can find our book in a paperback edition or download it on your Kindle, Nook, or iPad. Our goal is the same, whatever the format. To give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work that makes a difference. For more information visit macslist.org/book.

Now let’s turn to this week’s guest expert, Chris Guillebeau. Chris Guillebeau is the New York Times best selling author of the Happiness of Pursuit. The $100 start up in other books. During a lifetime of self-employment, he visited every country in the world. 193 in total before his 35th birthday. Every summer in Portland, Oregon he hosts the world domination summit, a gathering of creative remarkable people. Chris, thanks for joining us.

Chris Guillebeau:

Hey Mac. Thanks so much for having me.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, it’s a real pleasure. Chris, you’ve written a book about start ups. You put together an annual event called the world domination summit. I’ve attended and people come out of that event inspired. Many of them to quit their jobs and work for themselves. Now you’ve written a book about job hunting and careers. Tell us about that. Why this topic?

Chris Guillebeau:

The goal of the book is essentially to help people think entrepreneurially, whether they want to be entrepreneurs or not. Obviously, from my background I’ve always been an entrepreneur. I was a terrible employee. My bias is to help people essentially forge their own destiny, forge their own path. Maybe I’ve learned a little bit along the way that a lot of people can find the work they were meant to do, their dream job in a company or an organization.

For example, I talked to a lot of people for this book like I do for all my books and one person in particular … I talked to a woman who 20 years ago became the first female fire fighter in Mississauga, Ontario. I told the story of all the challenges she had to overcome and she’s actually been in that job for more than 20 years now. She believes it’s the work she was meant to do. This is a good example of someone who if you want to be a fire fighter, which is a very noble profession. Saves lives. Does lots of good work. You can’t just be an entrepreneurial fire fighter. You have to go through the structure. You have to be a part of a team. I’m looking at people, helping people find the work they were meant to do, and whatever capacity that is. It may even change over time. It maybe you’re working for yourself. You’re working in a company. You’re doing a little bit of both. It’s all that.

Mac Prichard:

Now with reading the book, one of the points you made that struck me early on was that we’re all asked what we do for a living. You say the better question we should ask someone is what lead you to do what you do? Why do you think that’s the better question, Chris?

Chris Guillebeau:

I look at a lot of people who have been successful and they talk about this dream job concept, which I know you’ve done a lot of work with as well. They use phrases like I’ve won the career lottery. I love my job. I would go to work even if I didn’t get paid for it, but fortunately I do get paid for it. What I saw in tracing back their history is most successful people, and again success can be however you define it, but most successful people in careers actually haven’t followed a very linear path. They actually didn’t know necessarily when they were six years old this is what they want to do with their life. They’re going to go to college along this trajectory. Then their first job and their second job is all leading to something. They’ve actually gone down a bunch of different paths. They’ve usually even made some mistakes. They’ve made mistakes because they were willing to take risks and some things don’t work out so they go back and they turn around and eventually they find this thing.

The reason I look at the whole process is because it’s not as simple as just saying okay here’s what I want to do. I know what that is. Now I’m going to make that happen. I think there’s always a process of discovery. There’s always this process of exploration along the way.

Mac Prichard:

I think that’s an important point to make because so many people that I chat with and my colleagues as well about careers, they think that if they try something and it’s not quite what they expected that that was a failure or a dead end. The point you’re making is that, it’s an experience you can learn from and it helps you get closer to where you want to be.

Let’s talk about career success. In your book you say that we’re taught these conventions, you actually call them scripts, about what conventional career success looks like. These scripts are just plain wrong. What are these myths, Chris, and why should people ignore them?

Chris Guillebeau:

I looked at a lot of wisdom that’s traditionally accepted and handed down. You might have touched on something just a moment ago, when you said lots of people who are successful have actually turned back and been willing to do like a 180 and try something different. This is contrary to the traditional Western manifest destiny, never give up, perseverance is the most important quality. A lot of successful people actually are willing to give up. They’re willing to give up, not on their dreams, not on their life vision, but on any particular strategy or expression or job or attempt at starting a business.

I talked to this one guy for example who had started eight successful businesses in his life. I asked him … it said eight successful business in his bio, so I said, were there any other businesses? It turned out he had a ninth business, which was actually the very first one. The first one was apparently unsuccessful. He had tried it for three years and it just wasn’t working. If you had gone to that guy in the beginning of his entrepreneurial career and said never give up. Keep going. You must make this a success. That would have been the wrong advice for him. The best advice was to give up, turn around, and start over. All these other things came later.

I looked at that. I looked at a lot of different things and tried to test them in a real world model to say okay this is like the so-called wisdom of the ages, but does it actually work? How does that actually apply and what can we do to increase the odds in our favor?

Mac Prichard:

One of your points in the book is that there is one script that we should consider following. There’s more than one way to work. You don’t have to [niche 00:19:55] down or be a CEO or you only have one chance at a job for example. If you say no to this opportunity you’ll never have as good one again. Talk to us, Chris, about that script that you encourage people to follow. That there’s more than one way to work.

Chris Guillebeau:

I think we put so much pressure on people. Especially young people, but even people of all ages. We have so much pressure that you’re supposed to know what your life purpose is at age 20, or when you choose what to study, or when you go into your first job, or even later. It’s like you’re supposed to have this crystal ball. You have to make all these decisions with limited information.

One of the things I saw was when people think about work, when they think about making a change or a career, they always think in terms of profession. They think about being a web developer or a doctor or a designer or whatever it is. What I saw was actually just as important as the work itself was what I called working conditions. Working conditions are things like how you like to spend your time. How much you like to work with other people versus work on your own. How you’re incentivized. How you’re motivated. How you like to be rewarded. You can start to understand this about yourself. You can actually make decisions a lot better. You may not have all the information but we’ll help you as you go forward. There’s more than one path. There may be one thing that you’re born to do but I think there’s more than one way to get there.

Mac Prichard:

Three things that you identified that you say we all want in our work are joy, money, and flow. Tell us about each of those and why they matter in not only picking your next job but in finding that work overall in a career that we feel like we’re born to do.

Chris Guillebeau:

I saw that, regardless of what profession people went into and regardless of what working conditions were most optimal for them, most people are happiest when they can create this intersection or convergence between these three qualities that you just named. The first two are pretty self-explanatory. Joy essentially is happiness. It’s something that you take joy in doing. You like your work. I think that’s an important goal. Money also self-explanatory. I’m not talking to people about a hobby. I’m talking to them about their career and your career has to be financially viable. Your work has to be something that you love to do, or at least it should be, that’s the goal. It should be sustainable. It should be viable. Then the third quality was something that I had to learn a little bit more about myself and that’s this quality of flow, which I essentially think of as using your unique skills. Doing something that you’re really good at. It may be something that comes naturally to you but it’s actually really challenging for other people. It’s the kind of work where you can get lost in it. You can have hours go by and you don’t realize because you’re so emerged in this particular work.

When you find all three of these qualities … Of course it’s a journey. It’s a process. I think that is the goal. I think that is what we’re essentially working toward in finding the work that we were born to do. Of course, at different times in our life we have to make compromises. We might have to settle in some way. When I was 16, I delivered pizza. That was fine. It was a job. I don’t think it was the work I was born to do. It was something that I did at the time to accomplish a goal and we have to do that at different times in life. If we’re working towards something that if we are interested in self-development, if we do want to advance not just our career but our life, we’re going to make decisions with that model in mind of joy, money, and flow.

Mac Prichard:

Let’s talk about career development. You identify sub-skills that whatever occupation someone wants to pursue, we all need to have to get the work we want. What are those skills, Chris, and why do they matter?

Chris Guillebeau:

When people think about skills, most of the time they think about what I call hard skills. Hard skills are technical skills. They’re the skills that you learned in your specific training in your job or your degree. If you’re an engineer, it’s those engineering skills or those programming languages or whatever that is. What I saw was that in career advancement, whether you’re trying to get promoted, whether you’re trying to find your dream job, create your dream job in an organization, or go out on your own, what I call soft skills are actually just as important if not more important.

Soft skills are basically areas related to communication essentially. Communication. Being able to facilitate a conversation or a meeting well. Follow up and follow through. Being that person in the room or in the meeting where there’s lots of good ideas being discussed but sometimes you can discuss good ideas and nothing happens … If you become that person who makes things happen and everyone starts to look to you and everyone’s like oh Mac should do this because he’s going to follow up on it. That’s a very very valuable skill regardless of your profession. This is not something that’s really taught. You don’t really take a class on this in college. It’s something that’s very valuable and I think it’s something that anyone can learn to improve and it’ll help them regardless of their specific career.

Mac Prichard:

Our listeners and I imagine a lot of your readers struggle with getting clear about what they’re good at. What they offer an employer. How do you recommend people do that?

Chris Guillebeau:

Very good, it’s always a process. The example we just gave a moment ago. We were talking about you’re working in a group and sometimes the members of the group, sometimes other people around you are actually better at identifying your strength or your skills than you are yourself. If you’re ever in one of these situations where tasks are being divvied up and everyone looks to you and says oh so-and-so should do this task. It’s almost like the group is affirming this skill. They’re recognizing it for you. That’s one way.

Another way is simply just trial and error and experimentation. We put a lot of pressure on people to know at a young age, this is what I want to do. This is how I’m going to develop myself and advance myself. Very often the initial decisions that we make are incorrect because we don’t have all the information. Again, a key point is if it’s not working, try something else. Over time you are going to figure out, okay this is actually what I enjoy. You can ask yourself at the end of the day, looking back okay what did I do today that gave me energy? What did I do that drained my energy? Just focusing on that day-to-day. How can I do more of those things that I actually enjoy? The things that we enjoy tend to be the things that we’re also good at.

Mac Prichard:

Many people are reluctant to chase a dream job or career because of risk. What are your suggestions, Chris, about how people can manage career risk?

Chris Guillebeau:

Risk is a big thing. What do we mean by risk? I feel like risk is a topic like fear. People are like how do you overcome your fear? What sort of fear are we talking about? How does it affect our lives? What are the strategies that we can navigate to help us with that? I think maybe the first thing is a question of defining risk and saying if I’m thinking of making a career change, is this really risky? Maybe it’s actually more risky for me to remain in my current position because the current position isn’t good for me. Even if it’s good for me, I need to somehow create more opportunities for myself because in this day and age I have to create my own security.

I wrote about this concept of being a self-employed employee where essentially you’re working in a job but the way you view it is I’m leasing out my talents to this company or organization. I’m going to do a great job for them, of course. I’m also going to continue to develop myself. I’m going to improve myself. That will allow me to go somewhere else or to be more valuable in my current position. When I think of risk, that’s the very first thing I think of. Let’s count the cost. Let’s see what really is risky. Then maybe also as you make changes, your confidence tends to increase. I think this is true with any goal in life. It’s not just a career thing.

I had this project of going to every country in the world. I didn’t have that project when I hadn’t traveled anywhere. I went to maybe 30 different countries. I lived in Africa for a while and then I started thinking what could I do with this? Then I had a goal of going to 100 countries. As I got closer to that, I was like let’s raise the stakes. Let’s go to every country in the world. As you get better in making these kinds of decisions and taking what you might call risks, then I think you become much more comfortable in taking more of them and raising the stakes even further.

Mac Prichard:

We’re kind of the close the interview. Chris, what else would you like to add for the listeners?

Chris Guillebeau:

We talked about joy, money, flow. I just gave that example of at the end of the day maybe ask yourself where did I get energy? Where is my energy drained? This isn’t meant to be like a woo-woo thing. This is meant to be very practical. This is meant to give you data that you can then base decisions on in the future. Here’s a really simple thing that you can also do. At the end of the day, you get out a little notebook and you answer this question: did today matter? You know the answer to that question. If you think back, you’re going to be able to say okay I actually … Yeah, today was good. I made some progress toward a goal or an objective that I believe in. I invested in the relationships that I value. Whatever those matrix or those goals are. Or you’ll be able to say, actually today wasn’t that great because I got stuck in something. I got sucked in. I spent my whole day responding to things instead of creating things. I want to do a better job. The whole goal is essentially in life, let’s get closer to more and more days that matter. If we have days that aren’t mattering, that we look back and say that wasn’t good, what can we change? Small and big ways.

Mac Prichard:

Well, terrific. Tell us, Chris, what’s coming up next for you? Obviously, you have the book and I believe you’re starting … Tell us about the launch date and your book tour.

Chris Guillebeau:

I’m really excited about the tour. The book comes out April 5th. You may be listening to this later, in which case the book is out. I’m doing a 30 city tour across North America. People can find out about that at bornforthisbook.com. Of course, we’ve got world domination summit coming up in the summer but at the moment it’s all book all the time.

Mac Prichard:

Terrific. To learn more about Chris, visit his Twitter account and his blog as well as the website about his book. We’ll be sure to include links to all of those sites in the show notes. Chris, thanks for joining us.

Chris Guillebeau:

Awesome, thank you so much Mac.

Mac Prichard:

We’re back with Ben and Jenna. What do you two think? What were some of the most important points you heard Chris make?

Jenna Forstrom:

The biggest take away for me is that successful people don’t have linear paths. It’s just a good reminder for people who are thinking about changing their career or are unhappy in their current career and think they are locked into this path in this American dream and how really big successful people all over the world have done 180s in pivots and made really awesome successful life stories out of that. To think about that and meditate on it and make your own changes.

Ben Forstag:

As Chris pointed out, that runs so counter to this narrative that exists out there. Think of all the kids in college who, you have to go study X so that you can get out of college and get job Y and then you can progress up the ladder to point Z at the end. It really doesn’t work that way. I think about all the stress I put on myself or that all the young people put on themselves to figure out what they want at the age of 18 or at the age of 16 when you first meet with that college counselor who is trying to get you into the right school. It’s a little bit crazy because people’s careers don’t play out in that linear way.

The point I liked was near the end. That very simple question of did today matter? There are days with any job, even with this job Mac where some days I walk out of the office and I don’t feel good about things. The day didn’t matter and I wasn’t happy. It’s sometimes things that I had control over. Some things I didn’t. The goal is to get more aware of the things that you can control and try doing things that do make you feel like today mattered. Fortunately, I think at this job, most days do feel like that.

Mac Prichard:

Well, good.

Ben Forstag:

That’s good. I think that’s just like an easy check to ask yourself every day to make sure whether you’re on the right path or not.

Mac Prichard:

I agree with both of you. Something that stood out for me was acknowledging that you can learn from failure. For me, I think I’ve talked about this before. I’ve worked on … I’ve lost count of how many losing political campaigns over the years but from each of them I’d learned something and I got something from the experience. I benefited from it and so did my employers down the line.

Thank you both and thank you, our listeners. If you like what you hear on the show, you can help us by leaving a review and rating at iTunes. This helps others discover the show and helps us serve you all better. We’re also celebrating a big milestone this week. Over the weekend, we reached 50,000 downloads since we launched the show on October 17th. That’s more than 10,000 downloads a month. We continue to rank in the top 40 in the iTunes career chart. Thank you all, our listeners, and thank you for letting your friends and colleagues know about the show. We know we’ve grown largely by word of mouth.

I also want to share a review we’ve received on iTunes. It’s from Nathan Cole Howard who writes, “Find Your Dream Job is the go-to podcast for millennials in search of their first job or their next job. I’ve recommended it to entire departments at colleges in Oregon and to at least a dozen friends. Definitely subscribe if you’re on the look.” Thank you Nathan, and thanks to the scores of other listeners who’ve left a review. Take a moment and leave your own comments and rating. Just go to www.macslist.org/itunes. Thanks for listening and we’ll be back next Wednesday with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job.



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Ep. 029: Interview Secrets Every New Graduate Needs to Know (Don Raskin)


Wed, Apr 06, 2016


College graduation season is just around the corner and departing seniors will find themselves in a strong job market.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the class of 2016 may experience the best job market ever for Millennials. A survey cited by the Journal says that this year employers plan to increase hiring of new college graduates by 15%.  That’s good news for this year’s new graduates.

But no matter how low the unemployment rate, you still have to interview successfully to get the job...

This week on “Find Your Dream Job” we’re talking about what recent college graduates need to know to nail their job interviews. Mac talks to Don Raskin who has written a book aimed at new and recent graduates that shares interview secrets and other tips you can use in a job search no matter where you are in your career.

In this 35-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why knowing your key facts (including salary requirements) is key in interviewing
  • How to position yourself in an interview and why you are the best candidate
  • Why knowing your objectives and sticking to them helps focus your job search
  • How to use LinkedIn as part of your pre- and post-interview process
  • How to follow-up after an interview

This week’s guest:

Don Raskin
Senior Partner, MME
Author, The Dirty Little Secrets of Getting Your Dream Job
New York, NY

Listener question of the week:

  • I graduated college in a couple of months, but have done almost nothing to prepare for what comes next. I’m feeling overwhelmed and don’t even know where to start a job search. What is the one thing I should focus on first?

If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: Getting Ahead by Being Unprofessional (Brittany Bennett)


Mon, Apr 04, 2016


Image is an important part of a job search--and career management, in general. You always want to present yourself as a competent, talented and, enthusiastic professional. But it's also important that your brand reflects who you are. Ultimately, authenticity matters more than professionalism. Your brand, no matter how polished and practiced, is worthless if it doesn't reflect your genuine personality.

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Portland-based marketing professional, Brittany Bennet, shares her experience learning the importance of authenticity. She reads "Get Ahead in Portland by Being Unprofessional", her contribution to our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

While Brittany's comments are specifically about her experience in Portland's casual professional culture, her lesson about being authentic will resonate no matter where you are.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 028: How to Look for Work After Age 50 (Kerry Hannon)


Wed, Mar 30, 2016


It is illegal for an employer to discriminate based on age, but many job seekers over the age of 50 will tell you it happens every day. Older workers stay out of work longer and may earn less than in previous jobs when they do return to the workforce. According to AARP the average period of unemployment for people 55 years and older is 54.3 weeks, almost twice as long as the 28.2 weeks younger workers spend job hunting.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we explore the challenges of job hunting when you're 50+. Mac talks with Kerry Hannon, a career and personal finance expert who has written extensively on the subject. Kerry shares practical, actionable tips older jobseekers can use to overcome age bias and find a job they love.

In this 34-minute episode you will learn:

  • The reasons employers are hesitant to hire older workers
  • How to overcome age stereotypes when you're looking for a job
  • Simple ways to prove your technology savvy to prospective employers.
  • The importance of networking and volunteering for older job hunters
  • Why an accountability buddy (or support group) can help you maintain optimism while job hunting.

This week’s guest:

Kerry Hannon (@KerryHannon | LinkedIn)
Personal Finance Expert and Author
Washington, D.C.

Listener question of the week: 

  • My current employer assigns “homework” to job applications that make the shortlist. This is a small task that reflects the kind of work they would do on the job. Do many organizations do this? Is it a growing trend?

Answering our question this week is our guest co-host, Michelle Hynes of MichelleHynes.com. If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager, at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director, at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 027: How to Find Work Overseas (Marcelle Yeager)


Wed, Mar 23, 2016


Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live and work in a foreign country? More people than ever are living and working outside the country where they were born. According to the United Nations, the number of international migrants now stands at a record 232 million people. That’s a significant increase since 1990. For many of these people the move to a new country is permanent; for others, it may be a temporary stay for a year or two.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we talk about how to find work outside the United States. Our guest is Marcelle Yeager a career coach and recruiter with deep experience in international employment. Marcelle shares tips for how to find and land work opportunities throughout the world.

In this 35-minute episode you will learn:

  • First steps in looking for a job overseas.
  • Networking tips for overseas opportunities.
  • Cultural challenges you may face when working abroad.
  • The most high-demand jobs for American expats.

This week’s guest:

Marcelle Yeager (@careervaletLinkedIn)

President, CareerValet

Washington, D.C.

Listener question of the week: 

I want to move across country, but I can’t afford to relocate without first having a job lined up. Do you have any advice on how to “woo” employers from 2,000 miles away?

Answering our question this week is our guest co-host, Jenny Foss of jobjenny.com. If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact Jenna Forstrom, Mac’s List Community Manager at jenna@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: How To Deal with a Bad Reference (Vicki Lind)


Mon, Mar 21, 2016


In all likelihood you've had at least one negative experience with a past employer or supervisor. Many of us have. Whatever the cause, these experiences can have a lasting impact on your career in the form of a bad professional reference.

Any prospective employer will want to talk to your past supervisors. So how do you overcome a potentially negative reference when you're on a job hunt?

On this 6-minute bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Vicki Lind, career coach and principal of Vicki Lind and Associates, shares a comprehensive strategy for how to minimize the impact of negative feedback from a past employer. She reads "How to Deal With A Bad Reference", her contribution to our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

Do you need more practical and proven job search tips to find a job you love? Check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). The updated Mac's List guide teaches you everything you need to get where you want to be in your career.   

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!



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Ep. 026: How to Make Your LinkedIn Profile Irresistible to Recruiters (Arnie Fertig)


Wed, Mar 16, 2016


LinkedIn is a vital part of any serious job search or recruitment. Smart job hunters use LinkedIn to tell a compelling professional story, document accomplishments, and show what they can do for others. A vast majority (94-97%) of recruiters and employers use the platform to find candidates who have the right skills, experience, and connections.

This week on “Find Your Dream Job,” we talk with Arnie Fertig, a career coach and LinkedIn expert, on how to use this platform to find a job. Arnie knows what recruiters on LinkedIn are looking for. He shares practical tips for building a compelling, eye-catching profile, as well as strategies for building rewarding professional relationships on LinkedIn.

In this 35-minute episode you will learn:

  • Tools for making your LinkedIn profile look polished and professional
  • How recruiters use LinkedIn and what they’re looking for in your profile
  • Strategies for attracting recruiters and potential employers with your profile
  • Why you need to be speaking in the first person (using “I”, “me”, and “my” on LinkedIn)
  • What NOT to include in your LinkedIn profile

This week’s guest:

Arnie Fertig  (@jobhuntercoach | LinkedIn)
Principal, JobHunterCoach.com
Boston, Mass.

Listener question of the week:

  • What should my LinkedIn title be if I’m currently unemployed?

Answering our question this week is Dawn Rasmussen, Chief Resume Writer at Portland-based Pathfinder Writing and Career Services. If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact us at communitymanager@macslist.org.

Resources from this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

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Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

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FULL TRANSCRIPT

Mac Prichard:

This is find your dream job a podcast that helps you get hired and have the career you want and make a difference in life. I am Mac Prichard your host and publisher of Mac’s List. Our show is brought to you by Mac’s List and by our book Land your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. To learn more about the book and the updated edition that we published on February 1, visit macslist.org/book.

Ben Forstag:

Hey Mac been here I have a question for you.

Mac Prichard:

Fire away Ben.

Ben Forstag:

We have an audience for a podcast that goes across the country and indeed around the world.

Mac Prichard:

I understand we are huge in China.

Ben Forstag:

We are big in China and we even have some listeners in Iran and I’m going to put out my call again if you’re listening to us in Iran please send me an e-mail I would like to hear your story. The reason I bring this up if I’ve gotten e-mails from several of our listeners asking whether our book is only appropriate for people looking for a job in Portland.

Mac Prichard:

That’s a great question we are Portland is our home town and we are very proud of it. Much of the information in the book is aimed at Portlanders it reflects our strength. You’ll find that if you do read the book that it’s valuable to anybody looking for work. There are eight chapters and they take you through what you need to do in any job search whether you’re in New York, Austin, Portland or even Tehran. The questions that you will find that we answer in the book include how do I find a well-paying engaging job. What can I do to stand out from other applicants. How do I learn about jobs that are never publicly posted. What do I need to do to get started in a new field. These are common problems for all job seekers and the advice you will find in our book will help you no matter where you live.

LinkedIn is a vital part of any serious job search or recruitment. Smart job hunters use LinkedIn to tell a compelling professional story, document accomplishments and show what they can do for others. Recruiters use LinkedIn to find people who have the skills, experience and connections that employers want. In a recent show episode number 17 with Joshua Waltman who is the author of Job Search and Social Media for Dummies. We touched on the importance of a LinkedIn account and the basic elements your page must have. Now that you’ve taken that first step it’s time to do more. After all of as of last year there was almost 400 million LinkedIn members. What will you do to stand out in such a crowded field?

This week on find your dream job we will tell you how to make your LinkedIn profile irresistible especially to recruiters. I speak to our guest expert Arnie Fertig former headhunter who has helped hundreds of people create great LinkedIn profiles. Ben Forstag has seven practical steps you can take now to shine on LinkedIn and our guest co-host Dawn Rasmussen will answer a question from a listener.

Joining us again this week is our guest co-host Dawn Rasmussen a pathfinder career and writing services. Dawn thanks for coming into the studio.

Dawn Rasmussen:

Thanks for having me, it’s good to be here.

Mac Prichard:

It’s great to see you again. Dawn, Ben when you two think about your LinkedIn profile what’s the one change that you’ve made that has produced the best result for you?

Dawn Rasmussen:

I would say making your profile as robust as possible. So many people they just do a very cursory just one liner about their work or whatever. You really need to go in with a fine tooth comb and add as much relative content as possible. Making sure that you keep track of those keywords because that’s how people search for you and for me, my clients find me through keywords on LinkedIn. You have to pay attention to those things.

Mac Prichard:

Okay good tip. Ben?

Ben Forstag:

For me it’s just updating my profile regularly instead of one big massive edit I try to go in there and tinker with it every couple of weeks or so. The thing that does is it puts you out there in front of your contacts, they see the changes you’re making and it is just a trigger for a conversation with contacts. I remember during my last job search I made some change on my profile and I got two or three people who reached out to me and said oh hey Ben it’s been a while since we talked tell me what’s going on what are you looking for what’s the good word. I think that’s a good habit to get into just so you’re always up there with folks.

Dawn Rasmussen:

I was going to say one other thing I actually publish articles too and I had one unexpectedly went viral there’s no magic formula for things going viral. It was kind of a controversial thing I said what you wear determines your career. It was talking about how people should dress for interviews and things like that. It really sparked a pretty big conversation on LinkedIn, I think I got over 117,000 views on that article. It’s just interesting because that brought a lot of people to my profile too because they were checking me out. That is a great publishing platform is to Ben’s point is to have some content that’s constantly coming out that’s refreshed about yourself too.

Mac Prichard:

I remember that post that you wrote Dawn and the attention you got from it, that’s a great point. It’s actually related to my tip which is there’s a status update section and even if you’re not creating original content to publish on LinkedIn you can take blog posts for example that you’ve already written for your company blog or an organization blog and write a little status update about them there and draw people to them blog. It gets to your point Ben about having a dynamic site that engages people and attracts the attention of others.

Now let’s turn to Ben Forstag our managing director who is out there every week exploring the Internet and he’s looking for blogs, podcast, books all kinds of tools that you can use in your job search. Ben what do you have for his this week?

Ben Forstag:

This week we’re talking about LinkedIn and I want to share a couple of resources around one of the most visible aspects of your LinkedIn profile. That’s the photo you use and I know it seems a little silly to be talking about a LinkedIn photo on a podcast, but it’s amazing how many bad LinkedIn photos there are out there and what a turn off this is for prospective employers.

Mac Prichard:

Are you looking for nominations right now because I have one I could share?

Ben Forstag:

Well you know lets hear it.

Mac Prichard:

I got an e-mail from somebody who wanted an informational interview, good guy and I went to his LinkedIn profile and there was a photograph of him with a cigarette dangling from his mouth.

Dawn Rasmussen:

I had an executive client who had a LinkedIn profile that had him in a water ski flotation vest with a woman’s hair cut off at the shoulder. It was pretty bad.

Mac Prichard:

That’s hard to top I guess if he had been wearing Speedos.

Dawn Rasmussen:

It was shoulders up thank goodness.

Ben Forstag:

I know our friends over at Mathis and Potestio which is a recruiting firm here in Portland and we actually had Steve Potestio on an earlier episode of the podcast. They had a bad LinkedIn photo contest where users could submit their own bad LinkedIn photos which is well intentioned and well hearted little contest. I’ll see if I can find the link to that and include it in the show notes. On past shows we talked about the importance of having a professional looking photo on LinkedIn. Our specific advice for those photos has been fairly high level. No spring break photos with a woman’s hair in the background. No photos of your cat etc. I thought I would get a little more into the weeds today and offer some more specific tips for taking the perfect LinkedIn profile pic. I’ll be showing two different blog posts today. The first is from the website entrepreneur.com and is entitled seven tips to make sure your LinkedIn picture is helping not hurting your prospects. These are all quick and dirty rules for having an appropriate LinkedIn photo and I will go over them real quickly.

One, appear approachable, friendly, smiling and looking at the camera. Two remember this is about you don’t include other people distracting backgrounds etcetera. Three make sure your photo is up to date and they have a great quote here. “If your professional headshot isn’t old enough to buy a drink in the bar it’s time to get a new one.” Look the part, clothes and grooming matter no wrinkled shirts, shorts et cetera, this speaks to your point earlier Dawn. Five, skip the Facebook esk photos. LinkedIn and Facebook are different platforms with different audiences so you want to get a photo that’s appropriate for the LinkedIn. Six, no selfies allowed this is a big one I think especially for Millennials. Selfies tend to be lower quality and it’s clear that you’re taking a selfie of yourself and the image itself is often pretty hazy. Seven, Photoshop with caution, a little bit is great but too much is bad.

Mac Prichard:

It’s important to invest in your career and your job search and getting a good quality headshot from a professional photographer might set you back $50 $100. Again it will pay so many dividends down the road.

Ben Forstag:

Increasingly at professional conferences I noticed the organizer of the conference will bring a photographer as part of your registration you will get a headshot. If you’re at an event and that’s an option certainly take advantage of that because that’s gold for your career. The first part of the equation is taking a good photo. The second part is formatting that image so it looks great on your profile. LinkedIn recommends an optimal image dimension of 400 pixels wide by 400 pixels tall. Meeting those recommendations is important to make sure that your photos are crisp and clear. On LinkedIn you can tell when someone has uploaded a profile photo that is too small because their photo will be highly pix-elated or blurry or sometimes it appears like a little small picture with a blurrier version of a picture behind it.

Here’s the rub though, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and all of these other social media platforms all have their own optimal image dimensions. They always seem to be changing those dimensions every 12 to 18 months. For the second resource I want to share today, it’s a cheat sheet for keeping up to date with those optimal image sizes. It comes from a website called Social Media Examiner and it’s titled the Ultimate Guide to Social Media Image Sizes. This is a resource I use on a regular basis when I’m posting articles for Mac’s list, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram and so forth. I’m not going to delve into all of the numbers here but I definitely suggest you check it out. Let me add there is a benefit here beyond looking good in your profile photos. When you’re adapting your images to each social media platform you are so showcasing your familiarity with that service. This is a great way to show your employees that you know how social media works. That you know how to connect with different social media audiences and that you have a higher level of attention to detail, all important skills when you’re talking to a prospective employer.

Mac Prichard:

Thank you Ben, if you have a suggestion for Ben, he would love to hear from you. You can e-mail him his address is Ben@Macslist.org. Now it’s time to hear from you our listeners, we are going to turn to our guest co-host Dawn Rasmussen from Pathfinder Career and Writing Services. She joins us here in the studio to answer one of your questions.

Dawn Rasmussen:

The question from a reader reads what should my LinkedIn title be if I am currently unemployed. Hint, unemployed is not a job title it is not gold. Unfortunately a lot of people do that.

Mac Prichard:

The other variation I see of that is currently seeking opportunities in _________.

Dawn Rasmussen:

Or looking for my next opportunity that’s not helpful.

Mac Prichard:

Right what do you think of those?

Dawn Rasmussen:

That’s not helpful, that’s not specific. I always say you don’t want to draw attention to the fact that you’re unemployed. When you’re thinking about your LinkedIn title you want to think about the job title that you eventually want to have and so that’s the first thing anybody is going to see and they’re going to put you in a bucket. What bucket do you want to be put in. You don’t want to be put in the unemployment and you don’t want to be put in the looking for the next opportunity bucket. You need to be aligning yourself with your target and that will help your audience understand you.

Mac Prichard:

Lets just pause there for moment Dawn, why don’t you want to be in the unemployed or seeking opportunity bucket?

Dawn Rasmussen:

It raises a lot of questions and it brings up negative before positive in my opinion. I think you should be optimistic and looking forward instead of ruminating about what just happened and so it’s just a bad place to be in my opinion.

Mac Prichard:

I agree and I would also add that there’s research that shows unfairly employers tend not to hire people that have been unemployed for a long time.

Dawn Rasmussen:

That is true, that is true. One thing that you do you want to do along this whole process it’s a fine line but you want to come up with a headline that’s accurate and speaks to your experience but also focuses on your next opportunity that you want. For example, if you’re in the field of journalism your title should either include journalist or reporter or whatever your specialist is. To make it clear what types of jobs you are interested in or what you’ve had. That will help make you more searchable and getting back to the keyword thing you always need to have keywords in your profile. It’s important to really kind of think forward like I said not look backwards.

Ben Forstag:

I have a follow up question here. In previous episodes we talked about the importance of being open about your employment search and letting people know especially your own personal contacts like hey I’m out there I’m looking for a new opportunity. How do you balance your advice about not being upfront with it with earlier advice about also being open and letting people know that you’re available for new opportunities?

Dawn Rasmussen:

That’s a very good question Ben and my suggestion is to take your summary section use that as a way to talk about your forward thinking and what you bring to the table. Then towards the end of your summary section say if you could benefit from someone who has this type of expertise contact me.

Ben Forstag:

That’s great.

Mac Prichard:

Thank you Dawn. If you have a question for us please e-mailcommunitymanager@MacsList.org. These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. We’ve made our book even better we added new contact and we’re offering it in the formats that you want. For the first time ever you can read Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond as a paperback book or you can download on to your Kindle, Nook or your iPad. Whatever the format our goal is the same we want to give you the tools and tips that you need to get meaningful work that makes a difference. For more information visit macslist.org/book and sign up for our special newsletter. You will get updates about the book not available elsewhere as well as exclusive content and special discounts.

Now lets turn to this week’s guest expert Arnie Fertig. Arnie Fertig is the founder of JobHuntercoach.com. where he helps people master the nuts and bolts of job hunting to find their personal brand and shorten the time until they are hired. He is a former executive recruiter and a leading expert on LinkedIn. Arnie also writes a weekly column for the on careers blog for US News and World Report. Arnie is a graduate of the University of Vermont, Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and the Hebrew Union college-Jewish Institute of Religion where he was ordained as a rabbi. Arnie thanks for joining us on the show.

Arnie Fertig:

My pleasure.

Mac Prichard:

I know you think long and hard about LinkedIn because you were a recruiter for many years and now you help job seekers. I know our listeners are very interested in hearing about how they can make their LinkedIn profiles most appealing to recruiters and employers. Let’s start Arnie by telling us how recruiters use LinkedIn.

Arnie Fertig:

I just interviewed a recruiter last week and he told me his entire practice was focused on LinkedIn. He uses it to advertise jobs, he uses it to search in a Google like way within LinkedIn to find candidates based on very complex searches. He looks at what people write in their groups and what their qualifications are and reaches out to those people that he thinks would be good fits for the searches on which he’s working.

Mac Prichard:

Arnie I know you talk to recruiters all the time and other career counselors as well. In your experience is that uncommon that a recruiter spends all of his or her day on LinkedIn and uses the tool that extensively?

Arnie Fertig:

The latest I’ve seen is somewhere between 94 and 97% of all recruiters use LinkedIn to source candidates. That’s virtually everyone at this point. More than that, it’s used by HR departments and hiring managers in the sourcing and the vetting of candidates as well.

Mac Prichard:

It’s interesting that figure of almost 100% is so high and just this week I’ve looked at a report from the Pew Research Center which said that about half of adult Americans are on LinkedIn. Perhaps as much as half of the workforce isn’t where recruiters are. Tell us Arnie when recruiters are trolling LinkedIn profiles what are they looking for?

Arnie Fertig:

They are were looking for keywords to match critical elements of a job description or a position description that they’re looking to fill. They will look at the requirements of the job. They will look at specific skills. They will look at things that would be relevant to the particular employer for example, distance to the job. They might look for the university training that one has had. Certain employers are fond of hiring people from a certain set of universities. They can search to see who has a particular degree from a particular university in a particular year located in such and such a place. They will get very granular with their searches and so that means that you need to have all of that information filled out so that you can come up as the response to a detailed query when a recruiter makes it.

Mac Prichard:

Listeners obviously cant control now where they went to school or where they live but they do have the ability to plug in key words, not only in their LinkedIn profile but in the skills section. What advice do you give people in thinking about those keywords and what is the strategy behind choosing them and how many should they choose?

Arnie Fertig:

I don’t think it’s a question of how many to choose and I don’t think it’s a question of just cramming your profile with keywords at this point because recruiters are more sophisticated than that. What they want to see are accomplishments and what they want to see are accomplishments that match up to the kind of expectations that employers have for the role that is to be filled. I would suggest that somebody take a look at several different job descriptions of positions that they might like to fill. Whether they are local or not whether they’re actually going to apply or not but the kind of position that makes sense for your next job. Plum those job descriptions for the key words for the skills that are called for, for the educational background that’s called for, for the verbs that talk about what you’ll be doing in that job. Make sure that you use those words in the way that you describe what you’ve accomplished in your current and former roles.

Mac Prichard:

Don’t talk about duties or tasks but about accomplishments and think strategically about the words you use in describing those accomplishments.

Arnie Fertig:

Exactly right. I think a resume is about telling a story it’s about giving a context or a challenge in which you encountered about the actions that you took to confront that challenge and what the results were in each little resume bullet. But in a LinkedIn profile you want to focus less on the responsibilities and more on the accomplishments. Make it much more personal, active and engaging. Because LinkedIn you have to remember is a social medium and it’s fine to use the word I and it’s fine to talk about what you’re passionate about and what really you’re proud of in terms of what you’ve done in your professional roles.

Mac Prichard:

That’s an important point you’re making because I think many people reflectively treat their LinkedIn profile like a resume and I think the challenge, it’s challenging for them to use the first person to say I rather than put everything into the third person. Why is that more effective why do recruiters like that?

Arnie Fertig:

I think it’s a question of being personable and showing that this is a social medium and that you can connect in a social way back and forth and interacting. When I’m interacting with you and your profile it’s you as a person not a resume that speaks about you in the presumed third person. LinkedIn is about ultimately not just looking for jobs and saying I’m out here look at me I want a job. It’s about creating relationships and it’s important to create the relationships with the recruiters even before you’re looking for a job so that you know the kind of people that are looking or the kind of recruiters that are looking for people like you.

Mac Prichard:

Let’s talk about that Arnie, we often hear from people here at Mac’s list who want to get in touch with recruiters and are uncertain about how to approach them and then once they do make a contact how to manage that relationship. What’s your advice about how to connect with recruiters through LinkedIn and how to keep that relationship going

Arnie Fertig:

It’s fairly simple to do a search an advanced people search on LinkedIn and look for people who have the title recruiter and do a geographic search based relatively close to where you are in terms of your zip code. Do a sub search on that to see who is recruiting in your industry or for people with your particular skill set. Narrow it down to a relatively small handful of recruiters. Then begin to reach out to them just in a sense of saying hi I’d love to have you know who I am, Id love to be of help to you in the searches that you’re conducting and would it be possible for me to have 10 minutes of your time to talk with you. A lot of people will be more than happy to be approached even if it isn’t in the context account of saying I know you’re looking for so and so now please consider me.

Mac Prichard:

When you get that appointment what kind of expectation should you have as a job seeker when you sit down with an executive recruiter either in person or perhaps over Skype for 10 minutes. How should you approach that meeting and what kind of results should you expect to get from it?

Arnie Fertig:

As an internet working meeting it’s about building a relationship and building a relationship isn’t just you’ve got, I need, therefore give me. It’s about what can I do for you. It’s about trying to understand the prospective and the needs of the other person. You want to find out what kind of searches the recruiter does, what kind of people does he or she look for on a regular basis. Offer to make connections for them when you can. At the same time the recruiter will likely ask you that’s great I really appreciate that and tell me also about you. Then you want to be able to succinctly provide in a nutshell, in a sentence or two, your own personal branding statement. Hi I’m a _______ ________ career person and I’m particularly adept at doing such and such and my proudest accomplishments are such and such. Stop let the recruiter then come in and ask more questions and find out more about what it is that he or she is looking to find out for you.

Mac Prichard:

Think about what you can do for the recruiter and how you can be helpful, be clear about what you can offer in terms of your experience and skills and then listen and engage the recruiter in a conversation about how you might work together.

Arnie Fertig:

Exactly it’s about building relationships, having conversations not just capturing 10 minutes of somebody’s time and haranguing them with your story and expecting them to help you.

Mac Prichard:

What’s your best advice Arnie about how to keep that relationship going after you have that conversation?

Arnie Fertig:

From time to time you might want to introduce somebody to that recruiter. Check out their website and see what they’re looking for and see if you know somebody that could be helpful to them. Either somebody who was a thought leader in the field or somebody who actually might be looking for a job who actually meets the criteria of the recruiter is looking for.

Mac Prichard:

Let’s bring it back to LinkedIn, we talked about the things that people should do and how to leverage LinkedIn into connecting with recruiters. Thinking about people’s profiles Arnie what do recruiters don’t want to see on your LinkedIn page?

Arnie Fertig:

They don’t want to see a non professional picture. It’s really critical to present a good headshot of yourself with a contrasting solid background so it doesn’t look like you’ve got a tree coming out of your head. Whatever it might be in the background. You don’t want to see children or pets or you standing on a mountain in a distance. You want a good professional headshot first and foremost. You then want to have a good solid title up at the top of your profile. What it is that you do for example, I see on Dawn’s profile, Dawn Rasmussen’s profile she has labeled herself as a CMP certified resume writer. It tells you in a nutshell who she is and what she does. That’s a very good use of the profile the same way you can say here’s what I am and give a job title or give a description of what it is you do.

Mac Prichard:

What are some of the biggest missed opportunities that you see that things people should know how to do and just don’t take advantage of?

Arnie Fertig:

There are few things, number one to recognize what people see and what they don’t see. Many recruiters have a paid recruiting package that enables them to see all kinds of information. But some don’t, some have a free account and you never know who’s who. You want to make sure that if you come up as a third degree connection to somebody else’s search where your name and your contact information will be blocked you want to make yourself find-able. The first thing you want to do in your summary is to give your name and your e-mail address. Not your address, not your phone number, not your social security number, and not your visa number. Just your name and your e-mail address so that somebody if they’re interested in what they see in you will be able to reach out and to contact you directly.

You then want to make sure as you go through the rest of the LinkedIn profile that you fill in all of the possible fields, all of the possible sections of your profile. You can list up to 50 skills you should do that. You can list your publications and your certifications and your experience and when you come to talk about the positions that you currently have and you had in the past you want to focus on giving people a sense of the size and scope and scale of what it is you’ve done and the accomplishments that you’ve made. You want to feel it in you don’t want to just leave your company and job title, otherwise nobody knows what you do or how you compare to anybody else who works in a similar company or has a similar job title.

I think it’s very important for people to understand that using LinkedIn isn’t just about putting out a profile. It’s also about being active on it. Using it as a networking tool online to create relationships. It’s about interacting with the people that you’re already connected to and continuing to build your network. It’s important to understand that there are multiple ways to find jobs on LinkedIn. Not only on jobs tab which is essentially a paid job board but also in your home page on your scroll on the homepage as you’re connected to a lot of people especially recruiters and people who tend to do hiring. HR folks you’ll see that they will often just put a a simple post up that they’re looking for so and so or such and such and those come scrolling by so it’s important to check that.

It’s important to check out the jobs that are listed in the various groups that you might belong to. Again you can be in 50 groups you should be in what I think of as a basket of basket of groups. There’s groups based on your locality, groups based on your title or your industry. Groups based on your skill set, groups based on your outside interests or your alumni groups from colleges and universities that you’ve attended. There is all different kinds of groups and you should be in some of each of those kinds of groups. Within each group there is a job tab to look at that and see what jobs are posted there. Those jobs are not necessarily going to be found on the large job tab at the top of the LinkedIn portal. Those jobs are just to be seen by the people in the group and often it’s a way that recruiters and HR people have of finding just a very small talent pool of highly qualified individuals for the specific search that they’re doing. They don’t want to be bothered by having to go through 500 resumes that everybody else is sending in.

Mac Prichard:

There is a whole universe of niche job boards out there at LinkedIn that are just hiding in plain sight and they are not that hard to find but you do have to know where to look.

Arnie Fertig:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

Well thank Arnie, tell us what’s coming up next for you.

Arnie Fertig:

I’m putting out an eBook, it’s available actually to people who are listening to this podcast on how to booster interviewing skills to get a job. I’m going to be publishing that soon but as an advance to that anybody who is listening to this podcast can get that free and immediately.

Mac Prichard:

Great and the URL for that which you were kind enough to send me before the show is info.jobhuntercoach.com/dreamjob. We will be sure to include that in the show notes. To learn more about Arnie visit jobhuntercoach.com, you can also connect with him on LinkedIn. You accept LinkedIn connections you told me Arnie.

Arnie Fertig:

Absolutely.

Mac Prichard:

We will include those links in the show notes. Thank you Arnie for joining us.

Arnie Fertig:

It’s been my pleasure thank you Mac for inviting me.

Mac Prichard:

Welcome back to the Mac’s List studio. Dawn, Ben what were some of the key takeaways for you from my conversation with Arnie?

Ben Forstag:

I think Arnie had a lot of good points, the one that I thought that was really astute was including your name and your e-mail address in the first line of your summary. I know I use LinkedIn a lot to find people and to reach out and if you can find that e-mail address especially if you’re not already a contact with that person it’s so valuable and it makes reaching out so much easier.

Mac Prichard:

I agree, I’ve been frustrated so many times trying to reach people who have a public LinkedIn profile and there’s no way to contact them other than through LinkedIn and many people don’t check their LinkedIn mail accounts regularly. It can be weeks even months before you hear back from them.

Ben Forstag:

We’ve all played the game of trying to reverse engineer an e-mail address based on the company URL and maybe it’s their last name, maybe it’s the first initial and last name. If you can avoid that frustration and just make it very clear how to reach out to you that’s the best.

Mac Prichard:

Make it easy for people to find you. How about you Dawn, what were some of the key points you heard?

Dawn Rasmussen:

He hit it right on the head this is a social media forum and you have to write and compel the audience, make them want to pick up the phone or type out a special e-mail to you. Make them want to reach out making it personal is the biggest thing. It really also just craving a constant stream of meaningful content and you can use that to connect to recruiters. I think Arnie mentioned that once you make that connection to the recruiter you can send them people, why not send them articles that might be helpful. You could become a helpful resource to the recruiters but then also show traction within your own profile that makes people want to reach out to you.

Mac Prichard:

I agree and for me the key point is one I keep running across again and again, people still think of LinkedIn as some kind of online resume book as if it’s an electronic binder and you put your resume inside it and magic things will happen you just have to sit and wait. That’s not how it works and there’s so much more as you say Dawn that you can get out of that platform.

Dawn Rasmussen:

I use the euphemism that this is a garden and you reap what you sow, if you only plant one or two seeds then you only get that amount back. You have to look at LinkedIn as sort of a garden that keeps … it needs nurturing, it needs to be watered, it needs to be tended to, then you reap and sow what you put into it.

Mac Prichard:

Good advice, thank you Dawn and thank you Ben and thank you our listeners. If you like what you hear on the show you can help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. It just takes a moment and it helps others discover our show and that helps us serve other job seekers. Here is an excerpt from one of the reviews we received recently. It’s from wildiris2008, that’s her iTunes name and she writes, really impressed with the quality and relevance of this podcast series particularly the guest speakers. I’ve listened to several shows and episode two about staying marketable in the absence of job security stands out. I’ve fallen into that trap of slacking off on professional development and networking when I get comfortable on the job and Dawn Rasmussen who is with here today offers concrete practical suggestions for how to stay focused on the long-term journey, says wildiris2008. Highly recommended for novice and seasoned job seekers alike.

Thank you wildires2008 and thank you to the scores of other listeners who have left a review. Please take a moment to leave your own comments and ratings just go to www.macslist.org/iTunes. Thanks again for listening and we will back next week with more tools and tips that you can use to find your dream job.



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Ep. 025: How to Make a Career Pivot (Jenny Blake)


Wed, Mar 09, 2016


These days none of us need to be told that change is the one constant in the workplace. Our job responsibilities change regularly--and so do our careers. The old model of climbing the corporate ladder or sticking with one profession for life is giving way to more fluid, transient, and cross-sector careers.

Just 27% of college graduate have a career related to their major. And the average American worker switches jobs--if not entire careers--every 4.4 years.

So how do you create career stability in a constantly changing job market? By pivoting.

This week on “Find Your Dream Job,” we talk about career pivots with with Jenny Blake, a coach for professionals and organizations looking navigate change. Jenny defines a career pivot as “a methodical shift in a new related area, based on what’s already working” and encourages job seekers to continually refocus on their strengths and passions.

In this 31-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why changing jobs every few years is the new normal
  • Why you should be doubling down on your professional strengths
  • How to manage your pivot in four phases: plant, scan, pilot, and launch
  • How to avoid professional stagnation and career crises
  • Why even unsuccessful career pivots lead to unexpected, positive rewards

This week’s guest:

Jenny Blake (@jenny_blake | LinkedIn)
Principal, Jenny Blake Enterprises
Author of Pivot: The Only Move that Matters Is Your Next and Life After College: The Complete Guide to Getting What You Want
New York, N.Y.

Listener question of the week:

  • I've recently had an interview with a prospective employer but after several weeks, I haven't heard back from them. How do I appropriately follow-up with the company?

Answering our question this week is Dawn Rasmussen, Chief Resume Writer at Portland-based Pathfinder Writing and Career Services. If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact us at communitymanager@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

--

Transcript

Mac Prichard:

This is Find Your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want, and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac's List. Our show is brought to you by Mac's list and by our book, "Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond." To learn more about the book and the updated edition that we published on February 1st, visit MacsList.org/book.

Ben Forstag:

Hey, Mac.

Mac Prichard:

Hey, Ben. How are you?

Ben Forstag:

I'm doing great. As our listeners might now, the book comes in 3 editions. We've got a paperback, a digital version for your Kindle, iPad, or Nook, and we've got a PDF version that you can view online. I'd mentioned before that the paperback version is our best seller, but the PDF version is really popular, too.

Mac Prichard:

What I hear from our readers who buy the PDF is they not only enjoy the book, but they get with it a set of videos, an audio interview, and tips sheets and checklists that you can use to turbocharge your job hunt. You can find a complete list of all the extra resources that come with the PDF on the website, but they include things like a salary negotiation checklist, 10 steps to success, or a fact sheet about how to work with recruiting agencies as well as video and audio interviews with career experts. Again, these are available only to people who buy the PDF version of the book. You can learn more by going to the website.

These days, none of us need to be told that change is the one constant in the work place. Our job responsibilities and the skills required change regularly and so do our careers. One estimate says Americans now average 4.4 years in a job. Just 27% of college graduates have a career related to their major. The old model of climbing a corporate ladder or sticking with one profession for life is giving way to the career pivot.

Today, we're talking about career pivots, what they are, and how you can make them. Ben Forstag has a website that will help you figure out whether it's time to leave your job. Dawn Rasmussen, our guest co-host, answers a question about how to follow up on an interview once you start pursuing your next career. I talk to this week's guest expert, Jenny Blake, author of the forthcoming book, "Pivot: The Only Move that Matters is Your Next One."

We're in the Mac's List studio, and joining us this week as our special guest host is Dawn Rasmussen of Pathfinder Career and Writing Services. Dawn, it's great to have you back.

Dawn Rasmussen:

Thanks for having me. I appreciate it, Mac.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah. You were one of our first guests here on the show. I have to give you a shout out. Your episode remains one of our most popular in downloads.

Dawn Rasmussen:

Wonderful. That's great to hear.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah. Let me ask you 2, Dawn and Ben, have you ever made a career pivot?

Dawn Rasmussen:

Boy, have I ever!

Mac Prichard:

Tell me about that, Dawn.

Dawn Rasmussen:

Oh, gosh. Well, let's see here. How many? I started out in television actually. I switched over to the hospitality industry. Then, I switched over into education and teaching. Then, I switched over into sales and marketing. Then, I switched over to owning my own business, so which one would you like to talk about? Just kidding. We don't have 5 hours. Ben?

Ben Forstag:

I've done a couple, as well. I started off in outdoor education, which is a pretty niche field, and then got into nonprofit management, and recently made the move from nonprofit to the for-profit space, working here at Mac's List.

Mac Prichard:

I've done the same. I stared out working for human rights organizations in Washington D.C. and Boston, and made the switch to politics, government, and political communications. Then, went to work at a university, and then eventually started my own businesses almost a decade ago, now, so a lot of change. We're going to be talking more about those changes and how people can make them with our guest expert, Jenny Blake, later in the show.

First, let's turn to Ben, who is always out there on the internet looking for tools you can use, blogs, podcasts, books, and other resources that can be helpful in your job search. Ben, what have you uncovered for us this week?

Ben Forstag:

On today's show, we're talking about making a change in careers. I'm sure our guest, Jenny Blake, will provide a lot of insights on how to make that specific career pivot. For my resource this week, though, I want to focus on one of the first steps that we have to think about when you're making that change, which is deciding to leave the job or the career that you've already got. Quitting your job is a scary thing, especially if you don't have a clear picture of what you're going to do next. I know there have been times in my life where I've been generally unhappy in my job, but I didn't leave either because my unhappiness wasn't acute enough or because I was too afraid to move. I think the big thing for me when I was a younger person was I was just really passive about my career.

I know in one specific job, I got stuck in a pattern where I would reach a breaking point with my position, and then they would offer me a pay raise. That would buy me off for a couple months, and I'd be happy. Then, 2 months later, I'd be right back at that same breaking point. Instead of leaving that job, they would just offer me another raise, and I would stay there. I probably stayed there a couple years too long because I got stuck in that cycle. Mac and Dawn, have you ever had a job where you weren't entirely happy, but you also weren't sure it was time to move on?

Dawn Rasmussen:

Yeah, I have. It was a difficult situation because the job that I was in, I had just started it actually. I realized that they hadn't really told me all the details about what the job involved. I don't tell this to many people. Why not tell it to 10 thousand people? Anyway, there was one aspect of job I had no idea how to do, and I'm a pretty resourceful and smart person. I remember going to a conference that was discussing about how to actually execute that portion of my job, and I broke down and started crying. I don't like giving up, but I just knew at that point that was not the right job for me because one half of my job, no problem. It was done. I was making changes. The second part I had not a clue, and it hadn't been really told to me in the interview about that emphasis. I had to make a change because I realized I just could not do it. It was hard. It was scary, too.

Mac Prichard:

For me, I think of an organization where I work that was getting off the ground and growing. It was experiencing dysfunction. It was not a place that worked well. Because of that, there was a lot of conflict, and it was not a happy place to go to work. I had only been there a number of months, and I just thought, "I need to stick this out." I hung on for almost 2 years before I found another opportunity. It did get better, but the lesson I took from that experience was if it's not working after 3 to 6 months, you probably should move on.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah, I think one of the themes that you hear in each one of our stories is that sometimes, there's a virtue to quitting. Oftentimes, we're told, "You never want to quit. Quitters never win. Winners never quit." Sometimes, it isn't the right fit for you personally, or it isn't making you happy. There's a virtue in quitting.

My resource this week is a cheat sheet to provide you some perspective on when you migth want to consider leaving your job, when it would be a virtue. It's a post from Forbes.com, and it's titled "14 Ways to Tell if its Time to Quit your Job." It's a real long article, and they go into depth with each one of these points. I'm just going to read the kind of top lines here.

Here are the 14 things you might want to think about:

1. If you're miserable every morning. I've been there. That's a tough one.

2. If your company is sinking, like Mac's experience.

3. If you really dislike the people you work with and/or your boss.

4. You're constantly stressed, negative, and/or unhappy at work.

5. Your work-related stress is affecting your physical health.

6. You don't fit in with the company culture and/or you don't believe in the company anymore.

7. Your work performance is suffering.

8. You no longer have good work/life balance.

9. Your skills are not being tapped.

10. Your job duties have changed, increased, but the pay hasn't.

11. Your ideas are not being heard or used.

12. You're bored and stagnating at your job.

13. You are experiencing verbal abuse, sexual harassment, or are aware of any other illegal type of behavior.

14. You're just generally not happy.

I think all of these are good points to think about. The one caveat I would throw in here is that there are times in every job where you might feel like this for a little bit, and it's about differentiating whether this is a temporary feeling or it's been going on for 3 to 6 months, as you pointed out.

Mac Prichard:

It's important for people to remember that they do have choices. Sometimes, you have to stay with a job because you have bills to pay, and the pay check is important. You do have to do that, but that doesn't stop you from also thinking about what your next move is going to be and where you might go, and taking steps to do that while you continue to work in a job that, frankly, isn't meeting your needs anymore. You do have choices.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah. Obviously, some of these are a bit more of a deal-breaker than others, right? If you're being sexually harassed, verbal abuse, or there's something illegal going on, it's probably best to leave as soon as possible. Others, where your work/life balance is suffering, that's one of these things where you might look for a long-term trend. Is it trending towards getting worse or getting better? You've got to make those decisions, and like you said, you've got some flexibility in how you direct your career.

Mac Prichard:

Well, thank you, Ben. If you have a suggestion for Ben, please write him. His email address is Ben@MacsList.org, and he may share your idea on the show.

Now, let's turn to you, our listeners. Our guest co-host this week is Dawn Rasmussen of Pathfinder Career and Writing Services. She joins us here in the Mac's List studio to answer one of your questions. Dawn, what are you hearing from our listeners this week?

Dawn Rasmussen:

Well, this week, we have a question from listener BJ [Roshanich 00:10:13]. BJ writes in and says, "I've recently had an interview with a prospective employer, but after several weeks, I haven't heard back from them. How do I appropriately follow up with the company?" Well, that's a toughy. You have to try to get ahead of this situation. Probably the key thing you need to do is during the interview, before it concludes, is you need to actually ask and set the stage for a follow up process, instead of just leaving it dangling. First of all, if you can proactively say, "What's the next step? When are you making a decision," that kind of thing. Then, if you do forget, sometimes people get a little nervous in interviews, so you should be following up. When you have a sense, maybe a week or so after they are done interviewing people, it's good to send an email. You should send a thank you right away, either by email or by snail mail. That's always a good business process to follow, but really, it's getting ahead of the 8 ball and understanding how their process operates so that you can actually respond accordingly.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah. Excellent advice, Dawn. This is a question we get a lot, and the best way to answer it is to do exactly what you recommended, which is to ask at the end of the interview, "What's the next step? How's your process going? How can I follow up?" They'll tell you. Thank you, Dawn. If you have a question for us, please email us at communitymanager@MacsList.org. These segments are sponsored by the 2016 edition of "Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond." We've made our book even better by adding new content and offering it in the formats that you want. For the first time ever, you can read "Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond" as a paperback book, or you can download it onto your Kindle, Nook, or iPad.

Whatever the format, our goal is the same: We want to give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work that makes a difference. For more information, visit MacsList.org/book and sign up for our special book newsletter. You'll get updates there that aren't available elsewhere, including exclusive book content and special discounts.

Now, let's turn to this week's guest expert, Jenny Blake. Jenny Blake is a author, career and business strategist, and international speaker. She helps her clients through big transitions, often to pivot their career or business. Jenny is also the author of 2 books, "Life After College," which is based on her blog of the same name, and "Pivot: The Only Move that Matters is your Next One," which will be published in September.

Jenny, welcome to the show.

Jenny Blake:

Mac, thank you so much for having me. It's an honor.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, it's a pleasure to have you. What is a pivot, and why does it matter?

Jenny Blake:

I define a career pivot as a methodical shift in a new related area based on what's already working. What I noticed was that in my own career, I kept bumping up on this really confusing question of what's next, every few years. I thought, "There must be something wrong with me. I'm only supposed to have a mid-life crisis and a quarter-life crisis. Why is this happening every 2 years?" For a while, and we see a lot of shame and blame around millennials. We call them job-hoppers and entitled. I had been working at Google, and I thought, "I must be one of those because every few years, I'm feeling really confused about what's next."

It wasn't until I realized 2 things: One, this is accelerating for all of us. It wasn't just me. As I started to talk to more people, I realized we're all experiencing this shift more often. Then, two, the thing that really got me out of it, because I thought, "This is so inefficient. I can't go through a life crisis every time I need to shift my career." I realized that it wasn't until I looked at what was already working and doubled down on it that I was able to move more seamlessly in the next direction. Rather than thinking about big leaps, I started to examine what was already right underneath my feet. That's where I got the idea of a pivot, like a basketball player who has one foot firmly grounded. That's your strengths and what's already working. Then, they scan the horizon for opportunity with their pivot food.

Mac Prichard:

I think that will be very reassuring to many of our listeners because a lot of people believe that changing jobs every few years is a problem, and there must be something wrong with them if they're doing that. What I'm hearing you say, Jenny, is that's the new normal.

Jenny Blake:

Absolutely. In fact, research shows that the average employee tenure is 4 to 5 years. Among people 25 to 35, it's now about 2 to 3 years. What I noticed in writing the book over the last 3 years was almost none of the people I interviewed at the beginning were doing the same thing by the time I went to fact check. Even what I had seen in the research, I thought, "Okay. People are shifting every 3 years or so, maybe 3, 4, or 5." That was not even the case with the people I interviewed. I couldn't keep up. Even now, as I'm getting ready to send the book off to press, I cannot keep the stories current. I'm going to put something on the website with what people are up to, but it was shocking to me.

Not all of this is by choice. It's not all people who are saying, "I'm bored. I want something new." In many cases, they were laid off. Their company was acquired. Maybe their company was acquired, and then they got laid off. They started their own business, realized it wasn't for them, and went back to employment. There were so many reasons for these career pivots that I think for everyone listening, the message is just don't beat yourself up. If you're at a pivot point, it's totally normal and has to be expected, whatever the reason.

Mac Prichard:

Recognize that change is normal. It will come every few years. It's not only about changing jobs. It's about changing careers. Let's talk about how people manage that process. What are some basic tips that you give people who are considering a career pivot?

Jenny Blake:

I do want to add that some people pivot within their role, so it's not always about pivoting career. Sometimes, it's just about defining, "I'm hitting a plateau in my role." A lot of these people who I interviewed are really high achievers. They just want to make sure that they're learning, growing, and ultimately, making an impact. In that case, it can be a good exercise no matter where someone is who's listening right now to say, "Okay, what's my one next move? What would be really exciting?" That's where I recommend people start is I have this 4 stage process: plant, scan, pilot, launch. Plant is about look at what's already working. What are you enjoying most, even if it's only 10% of your current day-to-day work? What's the 10% that you love? When do you feel most in the zone? What are your biggest strengths? What did you love to do as a kid? One year from now, what does success look like?

A lot of people get overwhelmed by that question because they don't know. They don't know the exact job, company, or even industry or location. Start broad. Just say, "How do you want to feel a year from now?" What kind of environments energize you? About how much do you want to be earning? If you can even start to paint a broad picture, it's like putting a pin in your maps app. Now, you know a little bit of where you're going, and you can scan for people, skills, and opportunity that will help you get there.

Then, the third stage, pilot, is about running small experiments. Take the pressure off to solve your whole career conundrum in one fell swoop and instead look for tiny experiments that you can run. At Google, we had 10 and 20% projects. Anyone in their career can think of it the same way. My blog started as a 10% project on nights and weekends and later became the foundation of my business, but I had no idea that's what it was going to become at the time.

Mac Prichard:

Last stage is launch, so people have gone through those first 3 steps: the plant, the scan, and the pilot. How do you see people launch?

Jenny Blake:

You can cycle through plant, scan, pilot continuously, over and over, until you feel ready to launch. The first 3 stages are a cycle. It's about reducing risk, seeing what's out there, getting more comfortable, and someone could plant, scan, pilot, and be doing that for years. There's no time crunch. I've worked through this entire model with someone in 10 minutes. With my coaching clients, maybe it's 3 or 4 months, but if someone's generally happy, plant, scan, pilot, they may not need to launch.

Launch is typically when we see the all-in moment. If someone is going to quit a job, start their own business, or move to a new city, the launch moment is when they really pull the trigger and move in the new direction, fully in the new direction. With launches, there's not a guarantee that it's going to work exactly as you have planned, but by reducing risk through piloting, experimenting, and grounding in your strengths, the launch becomes less panic-inducing. That's really the goal.

Mac Prichard:

Let's talk about risk for a moment because many people, while they recognize that change is a constant, they're uncomfortable with change and the risks involved. What are some of the ways that you see people manage risk as they go through this process or make a pivot.

Jenny Blake:

One of the diagrams in my book is called The Risk-ometer. It's taking the temperature of where you currently are on an inner feeling of risk. Someone could either be in their comfort zone, everything's fine. Their stagnation zone, that's where they're hitting a plateau, actively bored, or sometimes manifesting as physical symptoms. Then, in the other direction, we have a stretch zone. Something feels edgy and exciting. A panic zone, downright terror. When a lot of people think about risk as it relates to career, career change can be very scary because it seems to threaten our most fundamental needs on Maslow's hierarchy of food, clothing, and shelter. This is how we earn a living and pay for our life, so the thought of rocking the boat can be panic-inducing.

The goal in the pivot process is look for activities that put you in your stretch zone but not your panic zone. That's up to each individual to assess moment-by-moment. If they're getting overwhelmed, and they're kind of paralyzed, that's usually a sign that they're thinking too big and that the next steps they're considering are in their panic zone. Try and chunk it down smaller and smaller until you're squarely in your stretch zone.

Similarly, to have some awareness around are you comfortable right now, or is it approaching stagnation? The idea about pivoting is that it's really a mindset. It doesn't have to be these huge crisis points in our lives the way that it was for me for a long time because by monitoring and noticing when we start to fall into this stagnation zone, we can then take the steps to come out of it. The first step is that awareness.

Mac Prichard:

One of the points you made earlier was about the importance of playing to your strengths. Can you talk about the advantages of doing that because sometimes I think people think that they have to take risks or put themselves in places where they're constantly uncomfortable. Why do you recommend that people start by playing to their strengths, Jenny?

Jenny Blake:

When I reverse engineered what factors led to my most successful career pivots and then I started to study this for dozens if not hundreds of other people, I noticed that there was always a connecting factor. That was either their strengths, so ways in which they had become an expert or things that they really were good at, or people that they knew. Your network can be part of your strengths, as well. Usually, it's both. People you know are not going to offer you a job unless they know that you're really good at something. It was never looking at their weaknesses and trying to fix them that led to the next opportunity, and I'm not saying that's not a good thing to do. I'd recommend, if those of you listening haven't already, to check out the book "Strengths Finder 2.0," either as an assessment, so you can get your top 5 strengths. In the introduction to that book, Tom Rath talks about how much more effective we are when we emphasize and invest in our strengths rather than trying to fix our weaknesses.

Particularly when pivoting, one of the biggest pitfalls is people tend to obsess over what they don't like, what they don't have, and what they don't know because of the fear factor. A lot of times in career change, I'll even say to a coaching client, "What does success look like a year from now?" They'll say, "Ah. I don't want to be so stressed out every day. I don't want to be bored. I don't want to dread going to work." "Okay, that's kind of a start, but it doesn't put fuel in the gas tank." That's going to keep the car spinning its wheels in mud. By looking at strengths and what's already working, now the person can figure out how to double down on those and shift methodically in the new direction, whereas just minimizing weaknesses doesn't really propel someone forward.

Mac Prichard:

One of the things that you wrote about in your blog about pivots is that sometimes, people go down this road, they make a pivot, and they unexpected results. Can you tell us more about that, and how people should manage that?

Jenny Blake:

Well, unexpected results could be one of 2 things. One, the results surpass your wildest dreams. I've seen so many people who once they were clear that they were ready to make a change, and they started taking those first courageous steps, the universe, whatever someone's kind of spiritual beliefs are met them halfway. Opportunities seem to fall out of the sky. Part of that is I call it the universe rolling out the red carpet. For every courageous step they took forward, another roll unfurled on the carpet, meaning a person showed up, an opportunity, one next clue on their path.

The other side of a pivot unexpected is things might not work out exactly as you planned. Nobody I talk to, and there are many people, Mac, who came to me when I was fact checking. They would say, "Oh, don't bother putting my story in the book. I pivoted again." Almost as if they were discouraged that their first pivot didn't work. Nobody regretted making their launch decision. Even, I had 2 friends who quit their job, very high earners on the stock, the open outcry pits on Wall Street, they quit to start an urban farming business, and a year later, they folded it. They both went and found other work, but they don't see it as a failure. They felt so alive. That time really taught them a ton about themselves and about business. Even though they pivoted again, it still all was in a positive direction, which I call up and to the right, like a revenue chart.

Most of these experience, we learn from then. Even if what seems like a quote "failure" from the outside is still up and to the right in terms of our fit and what's best for us. We're never really done. Anybody who loves learning, growth, and making an impact, there's always this sense of exploration and risk. Part of it is just learning to embrace that uncertainty and not take it personally, like it's some kind of shortcoming.

Mac Prichard:

Good. That seems like a good place to stop. Jenny, tell us about what's coming up next for you.

Jenny Blake:

Right now, I'm finishing up the very last edits on the book, which is exciting. That's my big pivot, is the book will come out in September, which I'm thrilled about. In the meantime, I'm having a lot of fun with the pivot podcast, trying to interview experts on how to be agile in this economy. If change is the only constant, how do we get better at it?

Mac Prichard:

Great. We'll be sure to include links to the podcast and to your blog, which I know has information about your book, "Pivot: The Only Move that Matters is Your Next One," coming out from Portfolio Penguin Press in September.

Jenny Blake:

That is correct. Yep, you got it.

Mac Prichard:

Well, thank you for joining us, and you can learn more about Jenny, her work, and her books at JennyBlake.me. We'll include links to all of those sites in the show notes. Thank you, Jenny.

Jenny Blake:

Thank you so much, and a big thanks to everybody for listening.

Mac Prichard:

We're back in the Mac's List studios with Ben and Dawn. Ben, Dawn, what were the most important points you heard Jenny make?

Ben Forstag:

I really like the central pieces of her book, which is that you can make small changes throughout your career regularly. Back in my grad school days, when I was studying political theory, there was this idea of path dependency, that if you went too far in one direction, you were stuck there, and you couldn't make choices anymore. I think some job seekers think that way, as well. "I studied accounting in college, so I can never do anything else besides accounting for the rest of my life." I like the idea that she has that you can gradually transition to other things, no matter where you are in your career. It might take a little bit of time to go from your accounting background to becoming a professional actor, but you can gradually make that transition if you make the right steps.

Mac Prichard:

There's a book I think we've mentioned before on the podcast called "Mindset" by Carol Dweck, who is a professor at Stanford. She talks about how people often get stuck thinking they're only good at one thing, and that many people who enjoy early success are afraid to take risks because they worry that if they try something that they don't excel at, they'll jeopardize their success. They just don't continue to grow in their careers. They get stuck in one place. I think what I heard Jenny say was how important it is to have a mindset where you're not only open to change, but you learn how to navigate it because it's coming. It's coming early and often throughout your career. Dawn, what were your reactions?

Dawn Rasmussen:

I had sort of a interesting thought while she was talking. I think her idea of taking it one digestible chunk at a time is a great one, but there's also the problem of analysis paralysis. Because there are so many choices out there, there's, number 1, the fear of failure, number 1, but then number 2 is like, "Well, there's so many choices. What do I figure out what to do?" Many years ago, there was a company based here in Portland that let people try out or test drive their dream job. It was an opportunity for you to see if you like it and get sort of the inside scoop on what does this job really involve so you know if you want to move in that direction or not. I'm just looking it up on the internet, too, and it seems like there's been a proliferation of other organizations starting to offer the same thing. I think it's a brilliant stroke of genius, really, to come up with these test drive opportunities really to see, "Okay, is this something I want to do?"

It helps with the comfort level too because if you don't know quite exactly what it entails, there's a lot of unknowns. If you actually get in there and get a taste of it, you have a better sense of what you're getting yourself into, whether it's going to feel right or not.

Mac Prichard:

That's a great point. I think experimenting and trying new roles is always helpful, and it gives you a change to try something before you commit.

Dawn Rasmussen:

Before you buy.

Mac Prichard:

Yes, exactly. Well, thank you, Dawn. Thank you, Ben, and thank you, our listeners. If you like what you hear on the show, you can help us by leaving a review and rating at iTunes. This helps others discover our show and helps us serve you all, our listeners, better. One of the reviews we received recently is from Spring Rocks, who writes, "I find the very perspective of the hosts interesting. Their advice is actionable, and the tone is encouraging. Also, they stay on topic, and the show title's and notes make it easy to decide which episodes to focus on." Thank you, Spring Rocks, and we do our best to stay on task.

If you haven't discovered our show notes yet, please go to the Mac's List website. You'll find not only highlights from every show and links to recordings, but transcripts of not only the interviews, but all the content on the show. If you do have a moment, we would be grateful if you'd leave your own comments and ratings. Just go to www.MacsList.org/itunes. Thanks for listening, and we'll be back next week with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job.tools and tips you can use to find your dream job.tools and tips you can use to find your dream job.



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BONUS: Knowing Yourself is the First Step in the Job Search Process (Linda Williams Favero)


Mon, Mar 07, 2016


A dream job is one that perfectly fits your abilities, passions, preferred working habits, and lifestyle needs. As such, the first step in finding the perfect job is understanding yourself and knowing exactly what you're looking for in your career.

On this 5-minute bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Linda Williams Favero, career coach and program director at the University of Oregon Alumni Career Services Office, shares the questions you should ask yourself before you start looking for a job. She reads "It's All About You, Knowing Yourself is the First Step in the Job Search Process", her contribution to our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

If you’re looking for more advice on how to stand out as a stellar job candidate, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). The updated Mac's List guide gives you all the tools you need to identify, find, and land rewarding work. 

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

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Full Transcript

Mac Prichard:   

This is Find You Dream Job. The pod cast that helps you get hired, have the career you want and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac's List.

On today's bonus episode, we're sharing exclusive content from our new book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond compiles job search tips and career management tools into one simple easy to read guide. It's the definitive tool kit for anyone looking for meaningful work. The book also includes special contributions from an array of job search experts and today you'll hear from one of them.

Here's Linda Williams Favero, program director at the University of Oregon Alumni Career Services Office reading her contribution, It's All About You, Knowing Yourself is the First Step in the Job Search Process.

Linda Williams Favero: 

I encourage you to answer the following questions to begin your own self assessment process. First, what do you do best? What are your skills, knowledge and competencies acquired through education and experience of all kids, whether it's employment, volunteer work, life experience and so on? They represent your principle assets in the job market. So, an important part of communicating your value is correctly identifying and labeling these skills. Also, your personal characteristics or adaptive skills are inborn or developed early in life. They can include abilities, talents or predisposition to certain career directions. Third, your accomplishments or the things you've done that you are most proud of.

Next, what do you like to do? Your interest should help shape your professional objective which should be something you are interested in as well as something you are good at. In addition, your values or your core beliefs about what is the most important in life that usually evolves slowly and may change across your life. Next, consider what are your priorities in life. These are your personal preferences or things that might relate to location, schedules and income. Your professional objective should be consistent with your career vision and lifestyle needs. Also, your motivation. Consists of the drivers or needs that propel you along in your chosen career direction such as a sense of accomplishment, the satisfaction of being part of a team or the desire to travel.

Next, where do you fit? Although you may appreciate a good wage, you should also consider many other factors especially when you're working in Portland. First, culture. Do you want a clear line of command or something less hierarchical? Wellness. Does the company offer yoga, encourage noon time runs, discount at gym memberships? Global opportunities. Do you like to travel to the far reaches of the planet or hang close to home? Workspace. Have you dreamed of the corner office or prefer an open environment with beanbag chairs? Flexibility. Do you need an office to stay focused or enjoy the opportunity to work from home? Professional development. Do you want an MBA or the chance to travel to conferences in sunny spots? It does get awfully grey here sometimes.

Explore your strengths and weaknesses in other ways. Sometimes more tangential approach can yield productive insights and results. What's most important is to really that you are important in this decision making. It's important for you to consider what you do really well, what you enjoy doing, what are your priorities and what is the most important fit when you think about next job, your next career, your next move.

Mac Prichard: 

If you're looking for expert advice and insider tips like what you just heard, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. You'll find everything you need to get a great job whether your in Portland, Oregon, Portland, Maine, or anywhere in between.

The 2016 edition includes new content and for the first time ever, it's available in paperback, as well as in an array of e-reading devices including Kindle, Nook and iBooks. For more information on Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond, visit Macslist.org/book.



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Ep. 024: How to Return to Work at Any Age (Kristin Schuchman)


Wed, Mar 02, 2016


Most Americans begin work full-time after high school or college and hope to retire at age 65 or older. That doesn’t mean, however, that we remain in the workplace continuously for 40-plus years. Along the way, many of us will stop working outside the home to care for children, parents, or other family members. You may also choose to take time off for yourself, to explore the world, or get clear on what you want from life.

Whatever your reason for putting your career on hold, one day you will likely be ready to go back to work. Jumping back into the professional world after a prolonged absence can be difficult; and the challenge grows proportionally to the time you've been away from the workforce.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we’re talking about how to return to work at any age. Our guest is Kristin Schuchman, a career coach who works with professionals in transition, whether they’re changing careers, starting businesses, or re-launching into the workforce. As a mother who returned to school after age 40, she is especially attuned to the needs of midlife professionals in transition.

In this 33-minute episode you will learn:

  • How your professional priorities may shift and change when you take time off work
  • How to talk about and frame time off with prospective employers
  • Why volunteering is a crucial part to stepping back into the workforce
  • How to manage expectations when going back to work
  • Tips for getting clear about what you want to do when you return to work

This week’s guest:

Kristin Schuchman (@aportlandcareer | LinkedIn)
Career Counselor and Solopreneur Marketing Coach
Vicki Lind & Associates
Portland, Ore.

Listener question of the week: 

  • I paused my career for several years to raise my children. How should I explain that gap on my resume? What’s the best ways to frame this experience with a potential employer?

Answering our question this week is Aubrie De Clerck, principal at Portland-based Coaching for Clarity. If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact us at communitymanager@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

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Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

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TRANSCRIPT BELOW:

Mac Prichard:

This is Find your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard your host and publisher of Mac's List. Our show is brought to you by Mac's List and buy your book, Land your dream job in Portland and Beyond. To learn more about the book and the updated version that we published on February 1st, visit macslist.org\book.

Ben Forstag::

Hey Mac, so, I've been involved in this iteration of the book and I know that you had a first edition that was out before I started working at Mac's List. I've always kind of wondered, what inspired you guys to write this book?

Mac Prichard:

It was our readers of our blog that really drove this Ben. We wanted to share our best advice from the blog, especially the insider tips from more than dozen local experts. We had readers tell us they didn't have time to weigh through three of years of blog post. We as you know, because you added the blog now, there are three to five posts every week. We wanted to make all of our best work available in one easy to read book, and that's what readers will find, eight chapters, a hundred and twenty pages. They'll find in the book insider information you won't find anywhere else.

Most Americans begin work full time after high school or college and hope to retire at age sixty-five or even older. That doesn't mean however that we remain the workplace continuously for forty plus years. Along the way, many of us will stop working outside the home to care for children, parents or other family members.

Sheryl Sandberg author of Lean In estimates that forty-three percent of highly qualified women with children are leaving careers for a period of time. The Huffington Post says that there are more than ten million Americans older than age fifty who are caring for aging parents.

Whatever your reason for putting your career on hold, one day you will likely be ready to go back to work. This week on Find your Dream Job, we're talking about how to return to work at any age.

Ben Forstag has a book that shows you how to plan a break from your job and return to employment when you're ready. Aubrie De Clerck answers a listener's question about how to explain a gap on your resume when you stay at home to raise your kids, and I talk to this week's guest expert, a career counselor who helps people return to the workforce after a long absence.

We're back in the Mac's List studio, joining me are Ben Forstag, our managing director and our guest co-host this week, Aubrie De Clerck of Coaching for Clarity. All of us are employed full time right now, but I'm wondering have either one of you taken time out from your career either to care for children or other family members or for another reason?

Ben Forstag:

I've never taken a prolonged period of time off. I did take a month off when my son was born a few months ago. My wife though, she graduated from law school, worked for one year and has not worked for the last three years as she's been taking care of our children. Managing that dynamic of a professional taking time off, being home and trying to balance family responsibilities with a desire to do something with her career, that's something that we face everyday.

Mac Prichard:

That's a lot to juggle. How about you Aubrie?

Aubrie De Clerck:

I haven't taken any specific time off. I have had a period of my time in my work life where I used the flexibility from an employer to its maximum amounts. My mum has MS and there is a time where with her illness she needed a lot of support and care, and I was really fortunate to have a company and a manager that supported me in going and coming whenever I needed to, trusting me to get my work done, which I did. I have felt the pull between family needs and also work needs.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, I'm glad you had that support and you were able to have that time with your mum. Let's turn to Ben who is always out there doing research every week between shows, he's looking around the Internet for blogs, podcasts and other tools you can use in your job search. Ben, what have you got for us this week?

Ben Forstag:

This week, I want share a book that I read actually about a half a year ago and it's called Reboot your Life, Energize your Career and Life by Taking a Break. It's by Catherine Allen, Nancy Bearg, Rita Foley and Jaye Smith. This book is all about the value of taking time off from work, which I admit is an odd topic for a podcast that's all about getting a job. I thought there were some really valuable insights in this book that I wanted to share with our listeners.

I think most folks recognize that many professionals if not all professionals today are genuinely overworked. The scope of this problem is probably bigger than we often recognize. Not just corporate big wigs are being overworked, it's everyone really.
If you think about how we take our work home with us now in ways we didn't five, ten, fifteen years ago, it's really clear. The authors write, "Today, we rarely have time for rest, we have lost even our short breaks as technology, pagers, PCs, laptops, the Internet, cell phones, Blackberries and smart phones beckon us to be on 24/7. Even when we're supposedly off on weekends or in the evenings, we're on and it's taking a toll."

The solution according to the authors is to create more time and space away from work, which gives us not just an opportunity to relax, but also a chance to examine and think about the challenges we face in the workplace.

This last point is really important as one of the underlying premises here is that of all the hours we're logging in the office each day and all the emails we're responding to, the truth is we're really not that productive in our day to day work lives. This is a classic quantity over quality issue where we're doing more, we're just not doing it as well as we used to do or could be doing.

The big push by the authors here is to take full sabbaticals, three to six months out of the office. The book is full of testimonials from people who've taken those kinds of sabbaticals and about the value it's brought to their lives. It reduces stress, it encourages creativity, and upon returning to work, these people report dramatic increases in productivity.

The authors provide a fairly comprehensive list of tools to help you prepare for a sabbatical including financial planning and how to manage things like health insurance and retirement savings. Here is the bottom line, not everyone is going to be able to take three to six months off of work. In fact I'd venture to say that most people can't, I include myself in that. That being said, I think there's some important lessons in this book that can apply to most people's work experiences, and that's really what I want to focus on here. The first lesson is the importance of stepping away from work even for short periods of time. As the authors say, this provides perspective, it reduces tension and it generally improves the contentment you have with your job.

When we operationalize this idea, it doesn't need to be big prolonged times away from the office, but things like turning off your email when you leave for work at the end of the day, or taking weekends off or stepping away from a project if you have eaten your time line to do so, so you can get some clarity about that project, think about in a way that's not time line driven or deadline driven. I know I have a problem with this as well. Mac, you're a great boss and you don't demand that I'm checking email over the weekends, but I have a hard time not checking email and part of that is just I don't want to be ambushed by a negative email on Monday morning kind of mentality.

I know that the more I can step away on the weekends, the more fresh I am and the more productive I am on Monday morning coming in and addressing things at a more creative way. The other nugget of information I want to take out of this is that they talk a lot about the gift of time. That we need to give ourselves time to decompress from work, to think differently about work. I actually read this book when I was unemployed and the value I got from it was not taking a sabbatical, I was already kind of on a sabbatical but, treating that unemployment time as the gift of time, that because I didn't have a job, I could use this opportunity to think differently about what I wanted to do with my career, or think differently about projects or courses or issues or workplace dynamics that were important to me, or new ways to approach the kind of work that I knew I wanted to do.

Taking advantage of that unemployment and that gift of time to reset my professional clock and my way of thinking. It's a really interesting book and again, I encourage everyone to read it whether you're working or looking to take time off or maybe you already have time off, there's a lot of good insights there. Again, the book is called Reboot your Life, Energize your Career and Life by taking a Break, and I'll include a link in the shout outs.

Mac Prichard:

Great. Thank you Ben and kudos to you for during your time of unemployment seeing that period as a gift of time. I certainly struggle myself, I got two long periods of unemployment in my career with just the anxiety that comes with not knowing where your next job is going to be. Intellectually, I think personally I was aware that well, I should take advantage of this time off but, I, myself found it hard to do because I thinking about how do I get that next job.

Ben Forstag:

Don't sing my praises too highly Mac, I panic just about everyday. It's this unfortunate reality that you either have time or you have money but rarely do you have both of them together. After a month of actively searching and driving myself nuts during unemployment, I came to this realization that I can use this time not just to find a new job but, to do other things with my life and kind of reframe how I think about things.

Mac Prichard:

Okay. Thanks. Well, do you have a suggestion for Ben? A book or a website or a podcast that has been helpful to you with your career or your job search? Write him at ben@macslist.org and you may hear your suggestion on the show. Let's turn to you our listeners, our guest host this week is Aubrie DeClerck of Coaching for Clarity. She joins here in the studio to answer one of your questions. Aubrie, how are you?

Aubrie De Clerck:

I'm very good. How are you Mac?

Mac Prichard:

Good. What did you hear from our listeners this week?

Aubrie De Clerck:

Well, this is what we have this week. I paused my career for several years to raise my children. How should I explain that gap on my resume? What are the best ways to frame this experience with a potential employer?

This can be a really painful question for a lot of people, that the gap is something where they have a lack of confidence, they put a lot of time and attention on this gap. One of the things I wanted to mention is there's a great article on Working Mother called Find the On-Ramp. On-Ramping is a phrase that's used a lot in these scenarios. It talks about speaking about that time regardless of whether you talk about that in terms of volunteer work, in terms of the work that you did at home, but doing that with confidence and not going into a lot of detail.

I love that suggestion because we want to focus on what's going to open the doors for someone rather than go down this detailed trail around what that time at home was about. I think also looking at what was going on during that time and thinking about relevancy around the skills set and the contribution of the things that did happen, so that's the time at home or the time during volunteer work or connection around the community or doing part time which a lot of people dismiss, but has a lot of validity during this time. Making sure that the conversation and the threads that pull those things together relate directly to what an employer is asking about.

That's one way of addressing with an employer let's say in a verbal context a lot of times, during an interview. When we take a look at the resume, there's a couple of choices that are there. Some people state they put something in specifically about their time at home that covers that gap so there isn't that an empty spot. You can fill that in with the things that I was already mentioning like the community involvement, the volunteer work, part time work or connection to the skills. A lot of times if people are home schooling their children, there's a lot to be said about the skills set that takes to do that in application to a future work.

Mac Prichard:

I think that's terrific advice Aubrie as a job seeker, when I've been unemployed for more than a few weeks, I've used my volunteer experience and plugged that into my resume. Then as an employer, when I'm reviewing resumes, I think that volunteer experience is certainly a valid use of time and I've also seen applicants talk about spending time at home caring for parents or raising kids and just having an explanation of some kind makes all the difference. Everybody has a parent or many of us have children, we're all going to sympathize and understand why people take that time away to do it.

Aubrie De Clerck:

Yeah, I think that's one of the things I'm looking forward to hearing Kristin talk about is what's an employer reaction to this kind of thing. I think we have a tendency and we are thinking about things that we perceive it's going to be difficult or challenging to tell a story about what employers response is going to be, "Oh, it's going to go like this. They're going to toss my resume out at the very beginning." I'm not saying that those things don't happen, I'm just saying that there's many different stories around the way that employers feel about their kind of experience and the values that they have and the connection like you're talking about Mac, to their own lives. And the willingness to have conversations about what that means for someone and see those connections between what that person's life experience has brought them and what that life experience can bring as a value to where they're working.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, good point. We'll certainly explore that in the interview Kristin. If you have a question for us, we'd love to hear from you. Please email communitymanager@macslict.org.

These segments with Aubrie and Ben are sponsored by the 2016 edition of our book, Land your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. We've made that book even better, we've added new content and now we're offering it in multiple formats, including the paper back and Kindle editions. For the first time, you can download it on your Nook, iPad, Kindle or buy it via us or Amazon as a paperback. Whatever the format, our goal is the same, to give you tools and tips you need to get the meaningful work you want that can make a difference. For more information, visit our website www.macslist.org\book and sign up for our special book newsletter, and get updates not available else where, exclusive book content and special prices.

Let's turn to this week's guest expert, Kristin Schuchman. Kristin Schuchman works with professionals in transition, whether they're changing careers, starting businesses or relaunching into the work force after an absence raising kids or returning to school. Before focusing on career counseling, Kristin run a branding business and a women's magazine Nervy Girl. As a mother who returned to school after age forty, she's especially attuned to the needs of mid-life professionals in transition. Kristin, thanks for joining us.

Kristin Schuchman:

You're welcome. Thanks for having me.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, I appreciate you making the trip downtown and coming to the Mac's List studio. We're talking today about returning to work at any age.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

I think for many of our listeners, that means time spent at home often raising a family or caring for a parent or other family member. What do you find in your work? What do people need to do first when they're ready to come back to the workplace after a long absence?

Kristin Schuchman:

Besides the obvious things around getting your resume in shape and what not, I think what's important to remember is to maybe be willing to be a little bit humble about what your expectations might be about going back into the workplace. Maybe take something not entry level but maybe a step behind of where you were before. It's not always necessary, but it's just willing to sort of be open to that.

Mac Prichard:

Tell us more about that because I think I've certainly been in periods in my career where my pride got the better of me and I thought, "Oh, no, I'd moved beyond that." Obviously, the show is not about me but I know that some people might think, "No, I'm senior enough," that I shouldn't have to take a step back. Why can that help people in the long run Kristin?

Kristin Schuchman:

Because I think it's important to remember that even if you have to take a step back that a lot of companies are willing to move you up pretty quickly, once they see that you have a drive. I've heard that New Season does actually really good about that, that if they know that you have a lot of potential and that you're really committed to their values and being a part of their family so to speak, that they will move you up within weeks, not just months or years. So, just to be open to that. I hate to say this but I find that it's harder for men to believe that than women sometimes.

Mac Prichard:

I can see that, yeah.

Kristin Schuchman:

Yeah, that they might have to ... I've heard that about that when the economy took a hit that it was easier for women to accommodate to that because of that, because women were willing to take less senior positions and yeah.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, okay, so people have gotten their resume in order, updated their LinkedIn profile and they're looking for opportunities, they're ready to go back and they're mentally prepared to take a position a step or two below where they were when they last stepped out of the work force.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

What else should they think about?

Kristin Schuchman:

They should think about strategically volunteering and by strategically volunteering I mean volunteering in a way that is going to put them on the path to their career. A lot of times people when they come back to the work force after taking a break from like you said either parenting or care giving or what have you, an illness sometimes, they want to change because their priorities change, right. Those are the best examples of times when it's maybe a good opportunity to find an organization, and it doesn't have to be a non-profit, it can be, those are awesome places to volunteer and to get strategic volunteering experience.

I like people to also think about community projects that they might not think of like if you hear that a farmers' market is getting started in your neighborhood, jump on board with that and you'll meet people from all walks of life and you'll pick up skills from not just the people that maybe are supervising the project but, but all around you. A lot of people join those projects who have given skills but they want to give back, so to be open to that.

Mac Prichard:

I'm a big fan in volunteering that I can imagine some of our listeners, friends and family might say, "Well, you know what you really need to do is start applying for jobs, and sit down and start looking at job boards or for the very old-fashioned, look in the newspaper."

Kristin Schuchman:

Sure.

Mac Prichard:

Why shouldn't that be the logical first step? Why can volunteering help you more perhaps when you're coming back into the workforce?

Kristin Schuchman:

If you're ready to jump back in, I think that's great. I think sometimes when you're in a period of transition where you're not sure if what you're next step is, stepping back and volunteering for a while can be great because it can give you the opportunity to not only explore the realms that you might not have explored before and see what that's like, and why not take advantage of that. Also, it can give you a chance to grow skills that may not be open to you in the workplace or like maybe grant writing might be a good example of that. You can't just go out and necessarily and go ahead and say, "I'm going to be a grant writer." Even if you've taken a couple of classes. In most cases, you're going to have to write a grant for someone to prove that you can win some grants or at least have some writing samples to prepare to other employers. That's what I would say to that.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, that makes perfect sense. What about people who say, "Well, gosh, I want to return to that professional I was pursuing, and I've got ten, fifteen, twenty years experience before I stepped out of the work force." Why does volunteering make sense for me now?

Kristin Schuchman:

It's not as competitive as it has been for the last several years but it's still competitive and you just going to want to show up those resources and get those recommendations, references that you're going to need when you go back into the work force. It doesn't mean you can't take a two pronged approach, apply for jobs by all means but also think about places where you might volunteer to get that experience that are going to put you on the right path.

Mac Prichard:

Not only the experience but the relationships ...

Kristin Schuchman:

The relationships, the networking exactly, growing your network and yeah.

Mac Prichard:

And the recommendations.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

You talked about expectations, Kristin about perhaps thinking about applying for a position a little more junior than the one you might have last had.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

What other expectations should people have when they're getting ready to go back to the workplace after a long absence?

Kristin Schuchman:

Things change and things seem to be changing more now than even with technology and things like social media that some people have different feelings about, let's put it that way. At the same time, there's sort of these things that are changing and there's [agism 00:21:14] and what not. Remember that you do have a lot to offer, you have years of experience that you can bring to the table and not to forget that and that can be, it can be really easy to feel kind of minimized in a youthful centric culture that we have. Remember that you do have experience and a lot to offer. I encourage people to remember that.

Mac Prichard:

Good. We were talking earlier in the show, we had a question from a listener about how to describe a period like this when you're out of the work force for some years, how to best describe it on you resume. The three of us were saying that we think that employers generally understand, they're just looking for an explanation.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

What's your best advice about how to not only talk about in your resume but in interviews about an absence from the workplace.

Kristin Schuchman:

Kind of what you just said, it's realizing that people do understand but, then also being ready to talk about it, being ready to maybe role play before your interview and talk about your absence and why it happened, and not to get plastered. We can often feel if we're taking care of kids for years at a time or parents or we're like ill and spending time doing things in coffee shops so we feel like our brain is rotting or what not. If you're able to speak about it succinctly and actually talk about the skills that that experience taught you, that being a mother taught me to multitask and taught me to prioritize, taught to make decisions quickly. Those things have value.

Not every employer is going to get that and that's okay. The right employer for you, the one's that going to understand your lifestyle because it's probably pretty likely that you still have kids in the household if you're going back to work, or that your illness to recur, it's an illness that took you out of the work force. You're going to need a workplace that's going to understand that and be accommodating for you, so you're going to want to work for somebody who's not too hard nosed about it, if that makes sense.

Mac Prichard:

That makes perfect sense. I know you work with a lot of people who are making this transition back into the workplace. What are some of the most common concerns you hear?

Kristin Schuchman:

Just the idea that their priorities have changed, whether it's because they got divorced or because they experienced having kids and that changes you or this illness, an illness can be a life changing thing, taking care of a parent, all those things can make you reassess your earlier priorities. Often, I just hear people, "I just can't go back to that. I can't go back to managing data," or whatever it is and they want something that's going to be sort of more life affirming.

Mac Prichard:

As people go through that process Kristin of discovery, how do you see them get clear about what they want to do next and what steps do they take?

Kristin Schuchman:

We do a lot of self-exploration so we do things around looking at our values, a values assessment sort of sorts that we do with cards actually, and we look at skills in the same way, like what do you want to do for fifty percent of your day, what do you want to do for twenty-five percent of your day? What do you want to be a minor role in your day? That has a way of sort of just helping people to clarify. Things like the Myers Briggs is another tool we use to help people get some self-understanding. You might have heard of the strong inventory, we do that as well. Sometimes I have some other exercises I have people do. This one's a little bit more person specific, if they tell me they're a writer or they like to write, I like them to write their own obituary. It sounds a little morbid but it's a great exercise for determining what do I want to be written on my tomb stone, what do I want to have achieved in my life.

Mac Prichard:

I think that's a great exercise and it's actually the one I'm doing myself.

Kristin Schuchman:

Have you?

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, so it is very illuminating when you think about what you want to be remembered for.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right, and vision boarding is another thing that I've added recently that is really fun for people to do, yeah.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, so what I'm hearing you say is that it's common for people to think about a different goals when they come back to the work force because ...

Kristin Schuchman:

That's right.

Mac Prichard:

... Of an experience they've had with family or an illness or a parent.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

They need to be prepared to address that and get clear about what those goals are.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right. Part of that self-exploration is also determining what do you want your workplace to look like, do you want it to be a small startup? Do you want to go back into like a fast paced busy environment? Some people like that. Determining what you want that to look like.

Mac Prichard:

What are some other points you like to make when people are returning to the work force after a long absence? Things they should think about.

Kristin Schuchman:

They should be patient that it might take some time and to really not under emphasize the aspect of networking and a lot of introverts really get kind of freaked about that. What I say is I go back to that the never eat alone guy.

Mac Prichard:

Oh, Keith Ferrazzi.

Kristin Schuchman:

Yeah, I know it's an Italian name.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, I think it's Keith Ferrazzi. I've actually got that book on my book shelf.

Kristin Schuchman:

Yeah.

Mac Prichard:

Never eat lunch alone again.

Kristin Schuchman:

Yeah, and just the idea that you ... Don't necessarily go to sort of dry, boring networking events that leave you feeling like standing in the corner. Go do things that like to do, go kayaking and network with your book group and also let people know even your friends that you're looking and you're exploring and people want good things for you so they want you to be linked up with opportunities.

Mac Prichard:

Good. What are some mistakes you've seen people make that our listeners should avoid?

Kristin Schuchman:

I think maybe the high expectations too soon. Being wanting that great job that they had before they left, again that $130,000 job, they want to get back into that right away and they might have to be patient and wait. Or wanting the great pay but they don't want a long commute, they don't want to work long hours. If you're working for a six figure job, you're probably going to be working long hours.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah. We need to start wrapping up Kristin, anything else you'd like to share with our listeners?

Kristin Schuchman:

Just, that I want to maybe add that I am really prepared to help people with more the solopreneur aspect of things too. A lot of people come to me and they end up at the end of it, particularly if they've been out of the workforce for a while, deciding that they want to start a business, so that's something that's ... I like people to just really think of that too, that it is an option and there's a solopreneur boom going on right now and to not dismiss that instinct that you might have to start a business.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, self-employment isn't for everybody but I think the point you're making is a really important one which is that there are more opportunities to do that I think than there ever have been in the past.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

Depending on your goals, especially if they have changed, can make it be a very smart option.

Kristin Schuchman:

Right.

Mac Prichard:

Great, well, Kristin, thanks so much for joining us. Tell us, what's coming up next for you?

Kristin Schuchman:

Well, I'm getting in the spirit of entrepreneurship. I'm getting some groups started in the next month. One is going to be for people starting a business, and it will be about five people kind of a sounding board for people to come and put a bounce ideas of each other and work through their concepts. In some cases, a few people will be welcomed who don't quite know what they want to do. If they do know what they want to do, they would get started on getting a business plan started for them. Another group is more for creative people who have a business who have been doing it for a while but also want that sounding board, wanting that group of people to work with that will give them feedback and keep them motivated.

Mac Prichard:

I imagine people can find out more about that on your website.

Kristin Schuchman:

They can.

Mac Prichard:

Okay, terrific. You can find Kristin Schuchman online at www.aportlandcareer.com.

Kristin Schuchman:

That's right.

Mac Prichard:

All right.

Kristin Schuchman:

Thank you Mac.

Mac Prichard:

All right, thank you Kristin, thanks for joining us.

Kristin Schuchman:

Okay.

Mac Prichard:

We're back in Mac's List studio, Aubrie, Ben, what were some of the most important points you heard Kristin make?

Aubrie De Clerck:

The point that resonated with me most and I know will resonate with the listeners is this notion of when you take some time off that priority shift and change, and allow yourself sometime to re-evaluate what that might mean for your career. I think a lot of times we're in a rush to move from one thing to the next and transitions have their own natural flow and their own natural unfolding and so I appreciated the space that Kristin talked about, in creating one's own desires around what they want their work to look like and also patience with what happens after that.

Mac Prichard:

People for all the right reasons want to rush immediately to the application process and they start applying to job boards and positions they hear about online and if they're not clear about their goals and what they want, there could be a lot of ways to differ. Ben, how about you?

Ben Forstag:

Well, Kristin hit on one of our recurring themes on this podcast which is networking, networking, networking and how important networking is to finding a job. I liked her point about not just the formal go to industry events or mixers kind of networking, but the just putting yourself out there and letting your friends and your colleagues and your Facebook acquaintances and your kayaking club know that you are looking for work, because you don't know the kind of connections those people have and I know many, many people who found work through those kinds of connections.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, word of mouth is a powerful to learn about job openings and you do that through networking. It doesn't have to mean going to an event where business cards are exchanged, it can be as simple as just chatting with your neighbors and friends or people you meet while walking your dog.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah, the key is just putting yourself out there and being open about what you're looking for and why you're looking for it and people are happy to help.

Mac Prichard:

Well, thank you both and thank you our listeners for joining us. We hope that you'll come back next week. In the mean time, visit us at macslist.org, where you'll find hundreds of jobs. You can read our blog and learn more about our new book, as well as get show notes and transcripts for this and other podcast shows.

If you like what you hear on the show, you can help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. This helps us discover our show and helps us serve you and other job seekers betters. One of the reviews recently we received is from Pap RV who writes on our iTunes pages.

"The folks at Mac's List are offering information, guidance and support for efficiently finding the right work in this economy. The traditional popularized approach is a dysfunctional game of chance says Pap RV. Spraying resumes and cover letters and praying for results works well only for the very few. These folks know what works and share it."

Great contributions to the community, thank you. Thank Pap RV and thanks to the scores of other listeners who've left a review. We hope that you will take a moment and leave your own comments and ratings, just go to www.macslist.org\iTunes. Thanks for listening and we'll be back next Wednesday with more tips and tools you can used to find your dream job.



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Ep. 023: How to Switch from a Corporate to Nonprofit Career (Marcia Ballinger)


Wed, Feb 24, 2016


More than 10 million Americans work for nonprofits today. Even the Great Recession couldn’t stop growth in this sector. According to the federal government, the number of nonprofit jobs increased by 18% between 2000 and 2010. And that trend shows no sign of slowing down in the near future.

And while the demand for skilled nonprofit workers is huge, it’s often be difficult for established professionals to transition into this sector. It can be a challenge to frame skills developed in the profit world in a way that resonates with nonprofits. Plus, there’s a huge amount of diversity within the nonprofit space.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, Mac talks with Marcia Ballinger, an executive recruiter for nonprofit organizations and co-author of The 20-Minute Networking Meeting. Marcia shares her tips for how professionals in the private sector can make the jump into a nonprofit career. She believes it’s all about fit; you need to find the type of nonprofit--and a role within that nonprofit--that aligns with your skills, passions, and professional narrative.

In this 33-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why so many people want a nonprofit career
  • The multiple paths into the nonprofit sector
  • How to find the best “nonprofit fit” for your professional background
  • Why you need to get specific and focussed in your nonprofit job search
  • How to manage salary and benefit expectations when you move into the nonprofit space
  • The role of passion and values in a nonprofit career

This week’s guest:

Marcia Ballinger, Ph.D. (@marciaballinger | LinkedIn)
Co-founder and Principal at Ballinger | Leafblad, Inc.
Co-author, The 20-Minute Networking Meeting
Minneapolis, Minn.

Listener question of the week: 

  • I’m currently hunting for a job in the nonprofit space. I’ve recently saw an opening where the job duties perfectly align with my skills and professional interests; unfortunately I’m not really passionate about the organization’s mission. How should I address the “passion” issue during my interview?

Answering our question this week is Aubrie De Clerck, principal at Portland-based Coaching for Clarity. If you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode, please contact us at communitymanager@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com

 

 



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BONUS: The Secret Sauce to a Kick-Butt Resume (Dawn Rasmussen)


Mon, Feb 22, 2016


Among human resources professionals, it is commonly held that at least 85 percent of all resumes “suck.” Most resumes are are poorly written and formatted, and–most importantly–they don’t showcase the candidate’s value to the prospective employer.

Where does your resume fall? Is it in the mediocre majority or the awesome, “non-sucky” 15%?

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Dawn Rasmussen, president of Pathfinder Writing and Career Services, shares her advice on crafting a resume that stands out, grabs employers’ attention and lands you the interview. Dawn reads from “The Secret Sauce of Kick-Butt Resume”, her contribution to our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

If you’re looking for more advice on how to stand out as a stellar job candidate, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). The updated 2016 edition is an A-to-Z reference guide for how to find and land the perfect job. 

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

--

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Mac Prichard:   

This is Find You Dream Job. The pod cast that helps you get hired, have the career you want and make a difference in life. I’m Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac’s List.

On today’s bonus episode, we’re sharing exclusive content from our new book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond compiles job search tips and career management tools into one simple easy to read guide. It’s the definitive tool kit for anyone looking for meaningful work. The book also includes special contributions from an array of job search experts and today you’ll hear from one of them.

Here is Dawn Rasmussen, President of Pathfinder Writing and Career Services, reading her contribution, The Secret Sauce to a Kick-Butt Resume.

Dawn Rasmussen: 

Ask any Portland area human resource manager, recruiter, hiring manager, or headhunter, and believe it or not, he or she will tell you that at least 85% of all resumes suck. I know. I’ve asked them.

The good news is that there’s really a simple solution to this common problem. It’s all about shifting your perspective. You may think this document is all about you, but the truth is, it’s really about them. Them being the employer who’s reading your document.

With this staggering statistic in mind, in order to get into the top 10% of awesome resumes, your goal and mission is to start thinking about what you’ve done in the past and start positioning your accomplishments as value. That means not simply including your job duties beneath each employer. You’ve got to do better than that. Now is the time to start keeping track of on-the-job accomplishments. What have you done to make it better? What problems have you solved? How have you helped the company reach its goals? Have you helped make money, save money, or save time?

Fear not, you who have not kept track of such important things. Many times the answers to these questions lie in performance reviews, plans of work, staff reports, kudos letters, and many other recaps.

If you don’t have access to these documents, then your best guess is your best guess, but always be honest and also be conservative. The same thing goes for quantifying your results.

You should always try to put a number on your accomplishment statements that helps answer the question the employers have been thinking about when reading a candidate’s resume. Based on what this person did for the previous employer, what is he or she going to be doing for me? That’s the secret sauce to a kick-butt resume, when you can win them over with results not fluff.

Mac Prichard: 

If you’re looking for expert advice and insider tips like what you just heard, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. You’ll find everything you need to get a great job whether your in Portland, Oregon, Portland, Maine, or anywhere in between.

The 2016 edition includes new content and for the first time ever, it’s available in paperback, as well as in an array of e-reading devices including Kindle, Nook and iBooks. For more information on Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond, visit Macslist.org/book.



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Ep. 022: The Hidden Path to a Creative Career (Cory Huff)


Wed, Feb 17, 2016


Every day we bring to our jobs unique talents and ideas that nobody else has.  When we have the opportunity to put that creativity to good use, our work becomes more rewarding and our employers and the customers we serve benefit.

It is a myth that a creative career means a lifetime of poverty. Nearly 1.4 million Americans work in creative occupations. And while only a small number of those become famous household names, a vast majority maintain successful and rewarding creative careers.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we’re talking all about creative careers. We’re joined by Cory Huff, an actor, writer, and expert on the business of being a creative professional. Cory’s website, TheAbundantArtist.com, provides resources for creative professionals looking to better  market and sell their products and services. Cory shares tips on how to start and maintain a strong, independent, and financially sustainable creative career.

In this 32-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why a creative career doesn’t mean you’ll be a starving artist
  • Why "business" and "marketing" can't be dirty words for a creative professional
  • How to build a solid artistic career without being famous or “anointed”
  • The irreplaceable value of relationships for creative professionals

This week’s guest:

Cory Huff (@AGoodHusband | LinkedIn)
Actor and Owner, The Abundant Artist
Author, How To Sell Your Art Online
Portland, Ore.

Listener question of the week: 

  • I really want to work for a specific company. I'm thinking about taking a lower level job to get my foot in the door, in hopes I’ll be able to move into the job I want. Is this a good idea?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to communitymanager@macslist.org

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 021: How Women Can Win at Work (Farai Chideya)


Wed, Feb 10, 2016


Gender unfortunately matters in the workplace. Women, on average, earn less than men in virtually every single occupation.

In 2014, female full-time workers in the United States made only 79 cents for every dollar earned by men, a gender wage gap of 21 percent. That pay gap has barely budged in 10 years and, at the current rate, it won’t close for decades to come. Women also struggle to move out of middle management and break through the glass ceiling into the highest level of leadership. 

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we discuss how women can win in the workplace. We explore the dynamics behind gender discrimination and discuss tactics woman can use to overcome systemic hurdles. We’re joined author and journalist Farai Chideya, who has written extensively about race and gender in the workplace. Her newest book, The Episodic Career, explores the future of employment, identity, and personal satisfaction.

In this 33-minute episode you will learn:

  • The myriad factors that drive down pay for women
  • Why you should “be your own archivist” and document your accomplishments before leaving a job
  • How to strategically “lean in” when negotiating for salary or other benefits
  • Why the most valuable professional leads can come from people you don’t know well
  • Why gender discrimination is about more than just pay

This week’s guest:

Farai Chideya (@Farai | LinkedIn)
Journalist
Author, The Episode Career: The Future of Work in America
New York, N.Y.

Listener question of the week: 

  • How can I position myself as an industry leader or expert in my field? And how important is it to do this?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to communitymanager@macslist.org

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Mac Prichard:

This is Find Your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you get hired at the career you want and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard your host and publisher of Mac's List. Our show was brought to you by Mac's List and by our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. To learn more about the book and the updated edition that we published on February 1st, visit macslist.org/ebook.

Gender matters in the workplace. Women on average earn less than men in virtually every single occupation. In 2014, for example, female full-time workers in the US made only $0.79 for every dollar earned by men, a gender wage gap of 21%. That pay gap has barely budged in 10 years and at the current rate it won't close for decades to come. Women also struggle to move out of middle management and break through what's called the glass ceiling. Even though women hold more than half of the professional jobs in the United States they only make up 34% of middle managers, 14% of executive officers, and a mere 4% of CEOs.

This week on Find Your Dream Job our topic is how women can win at work. I talk with author Farai Chideya about the factors that push down wages for women and how you can negotiate better with your boss. Ben Forstag has an infographic that gives you the facts about the gender gap and other problems women face in the workplace, and Cecilia Bianco answers a question about how you can position yourself as an industry leader.

Ben, Cecilia, it's good to check in with you. Let's talk about this week's topic. What examples in your careers have you seen of gender discrimination.

Cecilia Bianco:

Not necessarily in my career, but I remember when I was in high school I had a friend whose mom was a news anchor and she had found out that her co-anchor was earning a lot more than her. It was a pretty big debacle and it ended in her leaving because she wasn't able to get the money she deserved from that company. It was in the media and it felt like a huge deal at the time. I don't think things have changed much since then, so it's a big topic for us today.

Ben Forstag:

Let me share a story from my wife's career. When she was out interviewing she happened to be visibly simple fact is they didn't want to hire someone who was going to take 3 to 9 months off to take care of a child, but those are pressures that many women face. Those are situations that many women see themselves in, and so finding ways to work around that is certainly key to helping women achieve equality in the workplace with men.

Mac Prichard:

A story that comes to mind for me is when I was in high school I had a job working at a restaurant at a hotel. I was in the morning shift with another person, a woman in her 30s. I was 17. It was a summer job for me and I enjoyed it, but she and I, I learned, made exactly the same amount of money, which to me was even, that kind of wage at 17 seemed extraordinary. It struck me for a lot of different reasons, but one was that for me it was a part-time job and I was saving for college and spending a lot of my income on things that teenagers buy. Music, fast food, putting gasoline in a car. For her, it was her whole income. I remember we didn't make a lot, just a little more than minimum wage, and she had to save for several months just to move from one apartment to another. That made a big impression on me.

Ben, let's turn to the resource that you found for us this week. You're out there every week looking for blogs, podcasts, and books. What do you have for us?

Ben Forstag:

I want to start off this week with an infographic I found all about women in the business world. This comes from the website allbusinessschools.com and it entitled Winning at Work? A Look at Women in Business Today. I'll admit it's a little bit odd to talk about an infographic, which is decidedly a visual medium, on a podcast, which is a audio medium, but I'm going to try to do this anyway. I'm a big sucker for a good infographic.

Cecilia Bianco:

Yeah, and this one is particularly good. It's super in-depth and it makes what you're seeing easier to comprehend.

Mac Prichard:

I certainly love visuals too. If you ever visit us here at the Mac's List office you'll find an infographic on the refrigerator.

Ben Forstag:

What I really liked about this infographic was that it nicely frames both the accomplishment women have made in the business world as well as the lingering barriers they face. For example, in 1965 only 1.2% of graduates from the Harvard Business School were women. Want to take a guess of what that number's going to be in 2017?

Cecilia Bianco:

I hope that it's a lot higher, but ...

Ben Forstag:

You are right. It's going to be 41% female, which is still not on par with men but certainly a huge jump. This is representative of a general overall trend of women excelling in terms of higher education. Right now women have 60% of all the undergraduate degrees, 60% of all the graduate degrees, and 45% of all advanced business degrees, which is really exceptional. The infographic also includes information about the highest paid female executives and other benchmarks of success for women in the workplace.

Of course we all know that women face a lot of professional challenges, and to be blunt the playing field is not equal at all. Across all levels of employment, as Mac mentioned earlier, women only make about $0.79 on the dollar compared to men. Things are slowly getting better, but there's a lot of room for improvement. One of the most shocking facts I found in this infographic was this, that at the current rate of progress, women won't achieve pay equity with men until 2058.

Cecilia Bianco:

Wow. That's way too long. Hopefully that doesn't play out in reality.

Ben Forstag:

Are you willing to wait, Cecilia?

Cecilia Bianco:

Not really, no.

Mac Prichard:

Not to be gloomy, but it is a gloomy number. When I got out of college, Cecilia, I remember going to an event and someone there had a button that said $0.63, and this was way back in 1980, 35 years ago now. I said, "What's that about?" She said, "That's what a woman makes compared to a man." I thought that number, "Oh, that can't last. That's going to go up." Here we are 35 years later.

Cecilia Bianco:

Yeah. We're crawling at this pace.

Ben Forstag:

It's bizarre because this is such a political issue that gets brought up over and over again, but we just don't see a whole lot of movement on it. The other shocking status in this infographic was that women are significantly underrepresented in the highest levels of executive management, as Mac brought up. The one stat I pulled out that I thought was crazy is that women are only 16.9% of board members at fortune 500 companies. That's just shocking. I mean, most of these companies at least 50% of their customers are women, but the folks running the organization are not, which is insane. If this is a topic you're interested in, and I think we all should be, I'd suggest you check out this infographic. It's "Winning at Work? A Look at Women in Business Today." I'll put the URL in our show notes.

I also want to do a quick plug for an organization that I've a friend who works for that is doing a lot help close that pay gap and helping women in the workforce. The organization is called momsrising.org. One of the reasons that women face so many barriers in the workplace is because they have most of the burden of taking care of children. That means watching the children on a day-to-day basis from 9-to-5 when many people go to work. That means taking maternity leave for young children. That means taking time off when your child's sick, and frankly a lot of organizations don't offer paid sick leave, maternity leave, or any childcare benefits as part of an employment package. MomsRising works with local governments and state governments to try to implement mandatory paid sick days, mandatory maternity leave, issues like that. If, again, this is an issue that you find important and that you want to do something about, I certainly suggest you check out their website. It's momsrising.org.

Mac Prichard:

Thanks, Ben. Ben loves to do research, but he also welcomes your help. If you have an idea for him or suggestion, a favorite website, book, please write him. His email address is ben@macslist.org. Now let's turn to you, our listeners, and to Cecilia Bianco, our community manager. Cecilia, you're here with us every week to answer our listener's questions. What do you have for us this week?

Cecilia Bianco:

This week I had a reader tweet at me and ask, "How can I position myself as an industry leader expert in my field, and how important is it to do this?" When I think of industry leaders and experts, I think of people who have a strong and present voice in their field. Having a voice these days typically starts online through platforms we all have access to and can use, blogging, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and really any platform where your voice is going to reach many people. If you want to position yourself as an expert or leader, you want to get your voice out to as many people and groups as possible and find ways to prove your credibility. Writing's a good place to start since it's an easy way to share your thoughts, especially online, and build a following of people who agree with you.

Speaking at professional or industry groups in your sector is another great way to prove credibility because 1, someone has endorsed you and your voice in order to book you to speak, and 2, you're growing your network through new people in the audience. Mac, you're seen as a community leader in our field, how do you think others can position themselves as experts or leaders?

Mac Prichard:

A strategy that could work for anybody is to be generous and share what you know. You've laid out specific strategies that people could follow to do that, Cecilia, whether it's sharing their ideas through blogs or social media posts, I think that would serve anybody well. I would just add in addition to being generous in sharing your expertise, be consistent. You don't have to publish on the hour every hour, but if you are going to commit to, say, doing a blog, commit to a schedule. It could be as little as once a week, or if you're going to run a social media account or post, say, to your LinkedIn page, find a schedule that works for you and then stick to it and people will come to expect to hear from you. They'll look forward to it as well.

Ben Forstag:

I'll just echo what Mac said. I think it's so important to help other people in your field. When you help others you really position yourself as a leader and as someone with integrity. I think if you can match subject matter expertise and integrity you can't lose.

Cecilia Bianco:

To answer the second part, as far as how important this is to be and industry leader, I think that really depends on what level you're at in your career. Obviously entry-level people can and should mimic the actions of leaders in their field, but it's unlikely at that stage that others are going to look to you as an expert or a leader. Once you're at a higher level, it's a little bit easier because you likely have years of experience that back up your opinions and your ideas. When you're just starting out I don't think it's a priority to be seen as an expert or a leader. It's more important to focus on getting that experience that you need. Once you're further along, making an effort to become an expert in your field can go a long way towards career stability and future success. Do you guys agree with that assessment?

Ben Forstag:

Absolutely. I think it's important that being an expert in your field, it's more than just style. Frankly, you see a lot of folks in the online world who, they produce a lot of content and a lot of style behind it but there's not much substance behind it. I think unless you really have mastery of your subject and you're new to the field, trying to position yourself as an expert is probably not going to work. You need to get a little bit of experience before you can really sell yourself as that expert.

Cecilia Bianco:

Right. I think that has to do a lot with proving your credibility before you try to be a leader in that field.

Ben Forstag:

Absolutely.

Mac Prichard:

I agree. One way to get that experience and then acquire that knowledge is buy curating content that others create. One of the biggest challenges that we all face is that we're overwhelmed by information. Somebody who sifts through what's out there in a particular field and presents the best ideas that they're seeing is doing a great service and building relationships and providing value and serving others along the way.

Cecilia Bianco:

Yeah, I definitely agree.

Mac Prichard:

Okay. Well, thank you Cecilia. If you have a question for us here at Mac's List, please email us at communitymanager@macslist.org. The segments by Ben and Cecilia are sponsored by the 2016 edition of our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. We're making the complete Mac's List guide even better. We've added new content and published the book on multiple e-reader platforms. Now that we've launched the revised version of the book on February 1st, for the first time you can read Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond on your Kindle, your Nook, or your iPad. You can also order a paperback edition. Up until now you've only been able to find it as a .PDF, but whatever the format, our goal is the same: to give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work. To learn more visit macslist.org/ebook and sign up for our newsletter. We'll send you special publication updates, share exclusive book content, and provide you with great prices.

Now let's turn to this week's guest expert. We're pleased to have with us Farai Chideya, who is an award-winning author, journalist, professor, and lecturer. She has a new book out. It's called The Episodic Career: How to Thrive at Work in the Age of Disruption. I had the chance to read it over the weekend. I highly recommend it. Definitely add it to your Amazon wishlist. Farai currently teaches at New York University's Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. She also frequently appears on public radio and cable television. She's a graduate of Harvard University where she earned a BA. Farai, thanks for joining us.

Farai Chideya:

I'm really delighted.

Mac Prichard:

It's a pleasure to have you, particularly to talk about this week's topic, how women can win at work. I think when many listeners think about the subject, the first thing they go to is the pay gap. We talked about that earlier in the show. What are some of the factors, Farai, that drive down pay for women?

Farai Chideya:

One of the most prominent ones in our day and age is the life cycle of women versus men. Women are much more likely, even now, than men to be involved in hands-on care giving. Of course immediately we think about children and women leaving jobs or not going on a fast track at a career because they have to, and want to, spend time with their children. There's also elder care giving, there's any number of moments at which people of both genders are asked to step up and women are somewhat expected to step up. I think that there's certainly a lot to women wanting to be a part of care giving, but there's also a cultural expectation around it. There's also, unfortunately, not a lot of infrastructure when it comes to women being able to step out of the workforce and then step back in. That's one of the biggest problems is that when women take that time for care giving or for other reasons and try to reenter the workforce, they find it very difficult to get back in.

Mac Prichard:

Let's pause there for a moment, Farai. What advice do you have for women who are about to take that time away from the workforce and for those who want to get back into it? All of us here at Mac's List, we hear from a lot of job seekers. This is a common issue and people are looking for successful strategies that they can use to make that transition. What have you seen work?

Farai Chideya:

I definitely think networking is the biggest solution. The reality is that most people have some set of close network ties. That is not actually what is most likely to get you a job. It's the weaker ties of people who are on the outer edges of your circle who have very different life experiences, sometimes than you, and they're seeing you through a little bit more of a remote lens. They're not your best friend. Maybe they're that person you went to college with and you see at a reunion every now and then. It's really important to go to those people to expand your vision of what opportunities are available to you. Also, as long as there's a good base for the relationship, even people who are not deep personal friends of yours will give that much needed recommendation and say, "You should really hire Jane or you should really hire Keisha. This is someone who I can vouch for."

That very specific, personal, "I'm vouching for this person," is the way to go and often is a way for women to reenter the workforce. There's also great job training programs available to some people, not everyone. In the book I profile people who have switched careers through federal job retraining programs, sometimes by teaching themselves, so self-taught computer programmers or people who teach themselves even something like scrapbooking, which now is a skill that you can market to other people. People hire professional scrapbookers to help them organize their memories. There's also sometimes a transition where you can work part-time in a new field while raising children or while care giving, and then work your way all the way into a full-time job.

Mac Prichard:

Okay. If you're getting ready to get back into the workforce, think about how networking can help you. I agree completely with your point about the value of weak ties. It's surprising how sometimes the most valuable leads and recommendations can come from people that you only know slightly. I'm also hearing you say look into job training programs that might be available through state or federal government. There might be opportunities there. Then think about reinvention about new careers or opportunities. Those are good strategies for people getting back into the workforce. What about people who are getting ready to leave to care for a parent or a child, a woman, what should she think about before she leaves with an eye towards that reentry, which might be months or even years later?

Farai Chideya:

First of all, there's an increasing tendency of people to do exit documentation when leaving a job. This is obviously leaving a job under friendly circumstances. Let's say that you're pregnant or you are taking time out for a family leave and you know that you're probably not going to come back for a while. Sit down and say, "I want to just document the work that I've done over the past year and the skill sets I have. I'd like us to produce a document that I can take with me." You have to be delicate about it. If you're not planning to leave the company permanently you can say, "I'd love you to put this in my personnel file."

Also keep a copy for yourself because workplaces change. If you know that you're really not coming back, but you're on good terms with who you're working with, you just say, "Well, you know I know there's probably not going to be a job for me by the time I'm ready to work again, but I'd love you to write a permanent documentation and recommendation that I can take with me when I either come back to this company or go elsewhere." You have to basically be your own archivist. You have to document your own career, you have to have people sign off on things, and don't just go back to someone 5 years later and expect them to know what you did. Take care of that beforehand and take it with you.

Mac Prichard:

Yeah, that's a great idea. An even more tactical suggestion I've seen people follow is just getting something as simple as LinkedIn endorsements or recommendations from supervisors and co-workers before you leave a position. Whether you're moving onto a new organization or you're going to leave the workforce for a period. Let's talk about pay. You mentioned how the life cycle, how it influences wages for women, what about negotiating salary? What advice do you have for salary negotiations?

Farai Chideya:

Well, this is a huge hot issue right now because women have been told to lean in. Then women have been told you can't lean in, that's fiction. Really, you have to be strategic about how you lean in. There's a professor at Carnegie Mellon, Linda Babcock, and she wrote a book, Women Don't Ask, Negotiation and the Gender Divide. Basically, she has done all these studies that show that when women make a direct ask in a negotiation like, "I got this job offer from these other people. Can you raise my salary?" Companies react fairly badly to that for women only. Men are allowed to say, "This is my market value. I'm laying it on the table. What can you do for me?"

Women are viewed as disloyal. It's a very gendered and emotionally fraught workplace culture around women and negotiation. You have to make a case as a woman for why your advancement or your higher pay or whatever is good for the company, good for everyone. Women are being asked to make a group argument, whereas men are allowed to make a bit more of a unilateral argument. Just understanding that allows you to frame things.

Mac Prichard:

Money matters a lot in negotiation about pay. What are some of the other measures of success that women should consider when going into those conversations?

Farai Chideya:

Certainly women and men should also consider, "How am I going to be evaluated?" Some companies unfortunately really look at productivity as just hours in the office. You may not be that great, but if you're there for 8 to 10 hours you are amazing. I co-authored a book previous to this about women in the technology industry and this one woman talked about how she was told by her boss that she was working "mommy hours." She worked the same number of hours as men, but because she was raising a child she wanted to start earlier in the day and leave earlier in the day. She was working just as hard doing just as much work, but she was working "mommy hours." She left the company. She was like, "I'll never succeed here if people don't recognize how hard I'm working."

One of the things you need to ask is, based on my needs, what is my desired schedule and can my company accommodate that? If the company can accommodate it, you need to be very clear and say, "I'd like to come to work at 5:30 in the morning. I know most people won't be here. I'll do my heavy duty project work there. Then when people come in we'll do our collaborative work and I'm going to be gone by 3:30 in the afternoon and go home and be with my family." If you get a negative reaction to that, you have to think about it. I also don't want to pretend that it's just something that women with children need to think about because again there are many different factors.

I have friends who are serious athletes well into their 40s and 50s, and they play in ... One of my friends actually is the reigning Golden Gloves champion, "senior champion," which just means that she's in her 40s. She's a female boxer. She's married. She has 2 kids. She's got a great, happy life, but boxing is important to her, and so she has a schedule where she can go and be this amazing national champion boxer. You may have any number of reasons for asking for a specific schedule, but scheduling is really important.

Mac Prichard:

Certainly that's an issue that comes up a lot when employers talk about millennials in the workforce wanting to have flexibility. I think your point here is an important one. It's all age groups and women and men that are increasingly look for that kind of flexibility. The glass ceiling is real. It exists in the workplace. What advice do you have for women who are seeking promotions and how they can move up?

Farai Chideya:

I do want to point out although we've been talking about the life cycle, which is how I framed things initially, that according to studies at least 12% of the pay differential between women and is due to "other factors," which basically means sexism. It's a polite way of saying sexism. When you control for everything, women still earn less. I definitely feel like when it comes to looking at the big picture of pay, time, advancement, you have to seek out people who you trust and then if they slip in that trust you have to remind them of the kind of social contract that holds you together. Like, "Well, I don't want to be annoying about this, but when Jason asked for so and so, he got such and such."

There's a precedent for this, or if there isn't a precedent for something you're asking for in your workplace you can acknowledge that and say, "I know no one has ever done this before, but based on my record of productivity, blah, blah, blah." When you're talking about whether it's salary, scheduling, all of the other factors that are important, you have to really seek out people you trust, but also be willing to give them a little nudge if they're not acknowledging your skills.

Mac Prichard:

Right. Be clear about what you want and have a clear ask.

Farai Chideya:

Exactly.

Mac Prichard:

We need to start wrapping up, Farai. Tell us about what's coming up next for you.

Farai Chideya:

Well, I'm touring with this book The Episodic Career. I'm doing some dates in various parts of the country. For me, I just did a date in New York and it was at the Harvard Club of New York, and so one presumes a very educated crowd and a white collar crowd. Let me tell you, everybody there was focused on the anxieties of the modern workplace. Whether I'm talking to people who are more middle income, higher income, everyone is anxious right now. I'm really doing a lot of active listening as I get to enjoy going around the country and talking to people about this book. I'm really listening to what people have to say because there's a lot of anxiety and fear.

One of the things I really want to stress to people is that we all deserve to lead good lives. Work should not be a constant fly in the ointment. If your work is a fly in the ointment, you really need to think expansively about what kind of work you want and how it fits in with your life and look towards those personal factors of satisfaction and being in a good, comfortable zone with the choices you've made. We all make choices. Not all of them are comfortable for us, but you have to at the end of the day say, "I made the choice that's right for me." It's about self evaluation. In the book I have a tool called the work-life matrix that really tries to integrate the personal with the work because at the end of the day it's not just about a pay check, it's not just about advancement. It's about what kind of life you get to lead.

Mac Prichard:

I was impressed by the number of tool and tactics that you had in your book. They're practical things that people can do to act on those choices. I encourage people to dig into it. Good, and I imagine the dates of your book tour are on your website.

Farai Chideya:

Yes. If you go to farai.com, F-A-R-A-I.com, you'll find both the dates of the book tour and some press that we've gotten and a few different excerpts of the book. There's a lot of material there and hopefully I'll be getting to a lot more cities over the course of the coming months.

Mac Prichard:

Good. I know people can also find you on Twitter. Your handle is @farai, F-A-R-A-I. We'll be sure to include that, the website, and the books you've mentioned in the show notes as well. Farai, thank you so much for joining us and it's been a pleasure having you on the show.

Farai Chideya:

I have been so delighted and I really think the work that you're doing is critically important. Thanks so much.

Mac Prichard:

We're back in the Mac's List studio. Cecilia, Ben, what are your thoughts after hearing Farai?

Cecilia Bianco:

I thought she had a bunch of really great information and tips for how to navigate your work life. I loved her point about being your own archivist because I think a lot of people forget to do that and then they regret it later on. That was an important takeaway for me. I just liked how she made work more about what type of life you want to lead and now just what type of job you want to be doing. I think that goes a long way towards your work life balance and your happiness overall. She had great tips.

Mac Prichard:

Good. What are your thoughts, Ben?

Ben Forstag:

My blood is still boiling over that mommy hours response that one of her clients got at an employer. That's just ridiculous. Obviously, I'm not a mother myself, but I am a father, and I understand the value and importance of getting home and spending time with your kids before they go to go bed. Any employer who doesn't recognize that, I can't think of anything nice to say about those kind of organizations.

In terms of tactical advice what she gave, the most important thing is being clear with your ask and with your demands of an employer. Unfortunately you can't just expect employers to give you what you want or to respect the work-life balance, so you need to go in with targeted requests and say, "Here's the value I'm bringing to the organization and here's what I expect back in return." Hopefully you've got reasonable employer who will meet those requirements that you have.

Mac Prichard:

I think having a clear ask is just vital. I think I've made this point before on the show. There's an old lobbyist I know, or experienced lobbyist I should say, who says the definition of a failed meeting is when you get up from that appointment and there's no clear next steps. That happens because people don't have a clear ask. It's great advice. Thank you all for listening. We'll be back next week with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job. If you like what you hear on the show, you can help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. This increases our standing in the iTunes career chart and helps us reach more people and help more job seekers. We have 2 reviews we'd like to share with you this week. Ben, would you like to share one?

Ben Forstag:

Sure. This one comes from [boney girl 00:32:16] who writes, "This is really valuable stuff. It kind of smashed old assumptions and expectations and offered a totally new approach that is energizing and exciting. Thanks for the wake up kick in the butt." You're welcome. Glad you found value there.

Mac Prichard:

All right. I have a review from [red dirt girl 00:32:33] who writes, "I will be graduating with my Bachelor's degree in 1 year and this is giving me so many helpful tips and recommendations that I'm already putting to use." Thank you red dirt girl for sharing that and we hope that you'll take a moment and leave your own rating and review. In the meantime, thanks for listening.



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BONUS: Four Principles to Guide Your Career (Ben Forstag)


Mon, Feb 08, 2016


Few people's careers play out exactly as planned. Changes of interest, new opportunities, and life in-general all interfere with the perfect, linear career plans we made with high school guidance counselor.

But even if you don't know exactly where you career is going, you can still control its direction. The key is being clear about what's important to you as a person and a professional. You don't need a detailed roadmap--just some guiding principles.

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Ben Forstag, Mac's List managing director, shares the fundamental concepts that have driven that have animated his career. Ben reads "Four Principles to Guide Your Career", his contribution to Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

If you’re looking for more advice on building a meaningful and rewarding career, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). The updated 2016 edition will help you get clear about your professional goals and provide you with actionable steps for getting where you want to be.

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

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Full Transcript

Mac Prichard:   

This is Find You Dream Job. The pod cast that helps you get hired, have the career you want and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac's List.

On today's bonus episode, we're sharing exclusive content from our new book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond compiles job search tips and career management tools into one simple easy to read guide. It's the definitive tool kit for anyone looking for meaningful work. The book also includes special contributions from an array of job search experts and today you'll hear from one of them.

Here's Ben Forstag, Managing Director of Mac's List reading his contribution, Four Principles to Guide Your Career.

Ben Forstag: 

Four Principles to Guide Your Career. Careers develop continuously over forty or fifty years of our working lives. They're subject to both internal forces, like family dynamics and changes of interest and external ones like the economy and the local job market. Accordingly, I've always been dubious about mapping out an entire career in advance. The linear progressions of model career development, law school, clerkship, federal prosecutor, night circuit, supreme court, rarely play out so cleanly in real life. I've certainly worked to navigate my career's direction. However, rather than targeting a predetermined destination, I focus on the journey itself. My career plan is less a road map, than it is a set of four practical guidelines. Here they are.

  1. Do what you're good at. We've all heard the dictum do what you love. This is great advice if you have strong passions and a clear vision for how to monetize them, but sometimes, the things we love most don't translate into a job that pays the bills. At least, not right away. In these situations, I urge people to focus first on their skills rather than their passions. Do what you do well. Skills can transfer to different jobs, industries and interest. Focusing on professional strengths gives your career flexibility while also eliminating potential avenues to work in the field of your choice. Ultimately, passion and skill are two sides of the same coin. There's a reason you're good at some things and not others. Your skill set is a reflection of the interest and enjoyment you derive from doing those activities. In this sense, doing what you're good is actually a way to do what you love.

  2. Keep learning. Taken by itself, the do what you're good at rule could lead to a monotonous and boring career. That's why it's important to stay curious and explore new interests and skills. Read books and blogs, take classes, network outside of your field. Do anything that exposes you to new ideas. You may discover professional interests that you never imagined. Throughout my own career, I've tried to say, 'yes' to learning opportunities whenever they appear. As a result, I've gained new passions for statistics, data analytics and coding. A surprising development for someone who went out of his way to avoid math classes in college.

  3. Stay balanced. It's good to be passionate about your job, but it's also important to have passions outside of the office. One of the best things you can do for your career is to have a healthy work/life balance which provides an escape valve from the stresses of work. It can also insulate you from the inevitable down periods of your professional life.

  4. Live your own dream. This is the final rule, but perhaps the most important. You have to evaluate your career according to your own criteria, not anyone else's. Measuring yourself against other people's success is like trying to live their dream rather than your own. Try to focus on what you want in life to do. Without worrying about what others may think. Remember, professional contentment is neither objective nor relative. The only question is whether your job and career path bring you happiness.

Mac Prichard: 

If you're looking for expert advice and insider tips like what you just heard, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond. You'll find everything you need to get a great job whether your in Portland, Oregon, Portland, Maine, or anywhere in between.

The 2016 edition includes new content and for the first time ever, it's available in paperback, as well as in an array of e-reading devices including Kindle, Nook and iBooks. For more information on Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond, visit Macslist.org/book.



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Ep. 020: Reinventing Your Career (Michelle Hynes)


Wed, Feb 03, 2016


Everybody knows that changing jobs regularly is the new normal. The days of working for just one or two employers through your adult life are long gone.

But what about switching not just jobs, but careers? Most of us will be in the workplace for four decades or more, so it’s a choice each of us will face. In fact, we may have three or four distinct careers over the course of our working lives.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we’re talking about the challenges and benefits of changing your career. Our guest expert is Michelle Hynes a career coach who specializes in helping people in the midst of work transitions. Michelle has, herself, gone through several career changes. She shares her insights on how to reinvent yourself, not just to improve your marketability, but also to increase your happiness.

In this 30-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why everyone--no matter your age--needs to plan for career change
  • How changing careers can empower you as a professional and improve your life
  • How to use informational interview to guide your career change
  • The importance of continuing education, training, and certification
  • How to manage the uncertainty involved in switching careers
  • Resources for older professionals looking for an “encore career”

This week’s guest:

Michelle Hynes (@mhynesPDX | LinkedIn)
Principal, Michelle Hynes Consulting
Portland, Ore.

Listener question of the week: 

  • What advice do you have for working professionals who would like to shift careers to a new field?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to communitymanager@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

 



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Ep. 019: How to Make (and Keep) Professional Resolutions (Victoria Crispo)


Wed, Jan 27, 2016


Did you make a New Year’s resolution to do something different in your career? The list of changes you seek in the next 12 months could include a raise, a promotion, or a new job. Or maybe you want to improve your professional skills by stepping up your networking, increasing your industry knowledge, or adopting new work habits.  

Whatever your goal, you’re not alone. More than 40% of Americans make New Year’s resolutions, according to some estimates. (Alas, research suggests only about 8% of people stick to those resolutions.)

So what are you doing to ensure your professional resolutions turn into a reality?

This week on Find Your Dream Job, Mac talks with Victoria Crispo, career development expert and manager of career content at Idealist. Victoria shares her advice on how to set and attain achievable career goals so that 2016 is a year you move closer to your dream job.

In this 33-minute episode you will learn:

  • How to unpack your big career goals into specific and measurable objectives
  • Why you need an accountability partner
  • The biggest mistakes to avoid when you’re setting career goals
  • Tips for making big (and possibly scary) career choices

This week’s guest:

Victoria Crispo (@_AskVictoria | LinkedIn)
Manager of Career Content
Idealist
New York, N.Y.

Listener question of the week: 

  • Should people who want to relocate move before they have a new job lined up?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Cecilia Bianco, Mac’s List Community Manager at cecilia@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

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FULL TRANSCRIPT

 

Mac Prichard:  

This is "Find your Dream Job," the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want, and make a difference life. I'm Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of "Mac's List." Our show is brought to you by Mac's List and by our book, "Land your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond." To learn more about the book and the updated edition that we're publishing in February, on February 1st, actually, visit MacsList.org/ebook.

A new year means a new start, and as 2016 beings, you're probably making resolutions to something different in your career. The list of changes you want to see in the next 12 months may include a raise, a promotion, and a new job, or maybe you want to improve your professional skills by stepping up your networking, increasing your industry knowledge, or adopting new work habits. Whatever your goal, you're not alone. More than 40% of Americans make New Years resolutions, according to some estimates.

In spite of those good intentions, however, most of us don't have much success in keeping our promises to ourselves. Researchers at the University of Scranton found that only 8% of Americans achieve their goals. This week on "Find your Dream Job," we're talking about resolutions, why most of them fail, and why those that stick work. We're recording this in January, but the issues that we're talking about and the information we'll share with you today you can use in any month.

Our guest expert this week is Victoria Crispo, who will tell us what people who are successful at keeping their resolutions do differently. Cecilia Bianco, our community manager, has advice about what to do if you're thinking about this is the year that you move to a new town. Ben Forstag, our managing director, has 2 blog posts you can use to make difficult career decisions.

All right, Cecilia, Ben, let's talk about your New Years resolutions before we move onto our guest expert and our resources this week. What's on your list?

Cecilia Bianco: 

Well, for me, I try to make my resolutions based on something I learned in the previous year. Last year, I learned that if I don't keep up with having all my work organized, then I kind of start to fall apart. In the coming year, I want to make a huge effort to stay organized throughout the entire year.

Ben Forstag:    

For me, I want to be better about getting out there networking on a regular basis, going to industry events, and just social mixers here in town, just so I can meet other professionals in Portland and in other areas. In the past, I've always done that sporadically, and my goal now is to set a regular schedule, a modest schedule, maybe once or twice a month, but have a schedule and go do that consistently.

Mac Prichard:   

Good. For me, I've found in the past that I have the most success when I just focus on just one or two things, so one of my resolutions last year was to publish the Mac's List book. We brought that out as a PDF this year. The 3 of us have talked about the new e-course that we hope to introduce in the second half of the year, and that's on my to-do list.

I'm curious, before we move on, are there tips that you have for our listeners about once you make those resolutions, the things you do that you find make it more likely that they'll happen?

Cecilia Bianco: 

I find that if I set aside time on my calendar to actually meet that goal, then I'll end up doing it. Setting a weekly reminder on Fridays, or something like that, "It's time to get organized," will keep me on track.

Mac Prichard:   

I'm also impressed, Cecilia, we share our calendars as a team, when I see that you blocked out time on your calendar to do certain tasks. That prevents the rest of us from interrupting you by scheduling meetings or appointments.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, it helps.

Ben Forstag:   

I think for me it's about setting realizable goals for yourself. There's always this inclination, when you set a resolution, to say, like, "I'm going to go from not running ever to running a marathon this year." That's a nice audacious goal, but sometimes it's just too much. It's really hard to reach that goal. The moment you find that you're not on the right step in the progress, you just give up. I would say for me, my goal is not to go to a networking each week. It's once a month, right. It's a modest goal. I can do it. It's achievable, and if I can do that for the next 6 months, then maybe I can adjust my plan and say, "It will be twice a month, now, or 3 times a month, or once every week." Just setting realistic goals that you know you can hit, but that are going to create a real effective change in your life.

Mac Prichard:   

Keep it realistic. Put it on your calendar, and those are ways you can make it happen. Speaking of resources, let's turn to Ben, who is out there all the time looking for tools you can use. What have you found for us this week, Ben?

Ben Forstag:  

This week, we're talking about career resolutions. Resolutions, as you know, often involve some kind of change, taking a new job position, going back to school, confronting your professional challenges, and things like that. Change can be scary, right? Especially if we're talking about taking a step into the unknown, something that you're unfamiliar with, taking that new job, where it's a big question mark of what it's really going to be like. This week, I'm sharing 2 blog posts that I've found that can help you manage your fears and make the right career decisions, the right career decisions for yourself, that is. The first post is from the Life Hack blog, and it's titled, "10 Questions You Should Ask When Facing a Tough Career Decision." The author provides some good, high-level questions you should think about whenever your career is at a fork in the road. I'm going to kind of cover this broadly, here. It's a post I'd suggest you go through and read because the author does go into each of these questions in detail. In general, his questions are:

  1. Are you willing to learn new things?
  2. Will you learn about yourself?
  3. Does this new opportunity scare you?
  4. Does a new opportunity change the way you think about success? For example, have you been thinking about success solely in terms of money, and then this new opportunity re-frames success as fulfillment, social good, or something like that?
  5. Does it excite you to talk about it?
  6. Does it affect people in your life, and how does it affect them?
  7. Is it fiscally responsible?
  8. Does it elevate your skills? In other words, how does this position position you for future career choices you have to make? Is it an advancement in skills and opportunities, or is it stepping back?
  9. Is it in line with your brand?
  10. Does it provide value? In other words, does it solve major problems or improve the quality of life?

Simply, these aren't clear yes-no questions. This is not the cheat sheet for making decisions in your life. These are really more open prompts. They get you thinking about the full impact, cost, and benefits of a prospective change. I love how each question frames the decision-making process around your own needs as a professional. I'd really suggest you check that out. Again, it's, "10 Question You Should Ask When Facing a Tough Career Decision," and it's in the Life Hack blog. I'll have the URL to that in the show notes.

Mac Prichard:   

That's a great list. One thought that occurred to me as you were talking, Ben, is a question I saw posed on a different blog, which is: When you think about how you want to be known professionally, whether it's as a manager, speaker, or a writer, ask yourself: How are you spending your time doing those things, and does your calendar reflect that? If it doesn't, then something's out of whack.

Ben Forstag:

Yeah. I think these questions are kind of the micro way of getting at that general, big question in there because I think sometimes that's a little bit too big of a thing to figure out or to put into your mind. This really gets at that. I particularly like the question about, "Does it fit with your brand?" That's just a fancy way of saying, "Does this fit with who you see yourself as and who you want to be as a professional?" Sometimes, people make decisions that don't fit with their brand. I think, at the long run, that's typically a bad decision. It's something you want to think about when you're making that big career change, whatever kind of change that is.

The other blog post I want to share is from the Muse. It's called, "The Scientifically-Proven Way to Overcome Your Career Fears." I'll admit, this title is a little bit click-baity, but I think the content in here is really good. We can excuse that title. We all know that sometimes fear immobilizes us and makes it almost impossible to make a good career decision. I know this has been true for myself in the past. I was once in a job that I was miserable at. Every day was painful to go to work. I didn't like it here at all. I didn't leave because I had this voice in my head that says, "What happens if you leave? You'll never get another job. You'll be destitute on the street." That's all just crazy talk in your head. (laughter)

Mac Prichard:   

I think we've all had that, that vision.

Ben Forstag:   

So we're all a little crazy, right?

Mac Prichard:   

Mine involves sleeping in a cardboard box.

Ben Forstag:

Okay, well maybe we can be neighbors, when we meet. I like this blog because it shares some tips on how you can overcome that knee-jerk fear reaction that you have, which is often not based in anything real. The author borrows from some controlled exposure strategies that psychologists use to treat other fears, like the fear of flying, or arachnophobia. Basically, it's a 3-step process.

1: Analyzing the fear, figuring out where that fear comes from, what it's costing you, how it manifests, and so forth.

2: Creating a plan to slowly expose yourself to that fearful situation so that you can give yourself a little leeway and test the waters without jumping right into something that you find scary.

Then, 3: Executing on that plan in a meaningful way.

I also like that the examples the author uses here about fears in a workplace situation. It's not just about switching jobs, which is a great unknown out there, but also about issues like how to confront a boss that you have issues with, which can be a very scary situation, or the fear of meeting personal professional expectations, which is one I, frankly, struggle with. Again, that blog is, "The Scientifically-Proven Way to Overcome Your Career Fears." It's on the Muse blog. Again, the link will be in the show notes.

Mac Prichard:   

Thank you, Ben. If you've got a suggestion for Ben, please let us hear from you. You can write him to his email address. It's ben@macslist.org.

Let's turn to our inbox, the high-tech mailbag, and hear from you, our listeners. Cecilia joins us to answer one of your questions. Cecilia, what are you hearing from listeners this week?

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, this week our questions is, "Should people who want to relocate move before they have a new job lined up?" That's a great question. I don't necessarily think there's a general yes or no to this question. It really just depends on your circumstances and how much of a risk it's going to be for you to relocate without first having a source of income. That being said, I do think it's easier to get a job once you're in the city that you want to work in. If you're able to relocate without taking a huge financial or personal risk, I would probably suggest it. Ben and Mac, you've both relocated more than once. Did you move before you had a job?

Ben Forstag:   

Well, I've done both. Back in the early aughts, I was living in Spain. My visa in Spain ran out. I had to move back to the States and didn't have time to find a job beforehand. Without a job, I moved to Washington D.C., somehow convinced an apartment building to let me move in without any provable income. It took me a while to find a job there. It was scary, but in that situation, I didn't really have many other choices, so I did that.

When I moved to Portland, I actually got a job lined up before I moved out here. I think that was a unique situation, though, because first, it's pretty rare, but second, I had a very strong case to make that I was moving to Portland whether I had a job or not. I think that reassured the employer that this wasn't just some flighty application. In the case of moving to Portland, I said, "My wife and I already have plans to move to Oregon. Here's the move date. We've already lined up housing and everything else." The employer knew that I was a real candidate. I wasn't just someone from Washington D.C. applying for a job.

Mac Prichard:

I've been lucky enough to have a job to each city I've moved to for the first time, Washington D.C., Boston, and Portland. I will say when I went to D.C., I had just graduated college and was coming off a political campaign. I had a promise of a job for 4 weeks, and it turned out, once I got there, I stayed at that position for 2 years. I didn't think twice about getting on the Greyhound bus from the Midwest, and I think it was just youthful optimism, not something I'd recommend to everybody.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah. It sounds like good experience. I do want to mention that while it is probably easier to find something once you've moved, we've actually heard plenty of success stories from people who have moved before having a job. We actually just published a post featuring a woman who found a job within a week of moving because of the preparation she did beforehand. If you don't have a job, but you want to move anyway, there are things you can do, like she did, to make it a smoother transition. Doing research on local organizations that you want to work for and getting connected to people who currently work there, that's a great way to start. You can also use social media as a tool to get a pulse on the local job market. On Twitter, it's always worth checking for a hashtag that covers what jobs are available. Then, Facebook and LinkedIn, there are tons of job groups in each city that you can join. You can also follow local companies, which often post if they're hiring on those 2 sites.

One more note: I think if I was planning to relocate, I would probably reach out to recruiting agencies in the town I wanted to live in because they're always looking for talent. They can really help you make the connections you need to before you move. Any other thoughts or suggestions?

Ben Forstag:  

I have a question for you. In the past, when I've applied for a job when I was out of state, I've thought, "Well, if only I had like a P.O. box that said 'Portland' on it when I applied to this Portland-based job." Do you think there's any value in that, or is that just disingenuous?

Cecilia Bianco: 

I don't think it's a good idea to make that up. I think that there's little things you can do, like changing your location online. On LinkedIn, if you change your city, that's a great thing to do. If employers are looking, they'll see, not that you're in that city necessarily, but if they're looking to hire in that city, if you're there, they can find you.

Ben Forstag:      

You've publicly committed to moving to that city.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Right, right.

Mac Prichard: 

I like your suggestion, Cecilia, about connecting with a temporary agency because not only can you make good connections that could lead to a permanent position, but if you do come to a town and you don't have a job there, that's a way of getting work right away, beginning to meet people, and make those connections that you can't do from afar.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah. I think that's really important. The quickest way to find a job is through people you know, so doing what you can to make those personal connections in advance is the best thing.

Ben Forstag:    

I'd just throw out there as well that, from what I know about employers and how they work, if they think you're the right person and you're going to solve their problems, they will wait for a couple weeks or a month until you are able to relocate to the town for them. Obviously, the location differences create a barrier, but it's not an insurmountable barrier. It puts just a little more onus on the job seeker to prove that they are the absolute, unique, right match for that position.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, definitely.

Mac Prichard:   

Thanks for that great information, Cecilia. If you have a question for Cecilia, please email her. Her address is cecilia@macslist.org .

These segments by Ben and Cecilia are sponsored by the 2016 edition of "Land Your Dream Job in Portland and Beyond." We're making the complete Mac's List guide even better. We're adding new content and publishing the book on different e-reader platforms. On February 1st of this year, 2016, you'll be able to access for the first time "Land Your Dream Job in Portland" on your Kindle, Nook, iPad, and other digital devices. You'll also be able to get, for the first time, a paperback edition. Whatever the format, our goal is the same: to give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work. For more information, visit macslist.org/ebook and sign up for our e-book newsletter. Once you do, we'll send you publication updates and share exclusive book content, as well as provide you with special pre-sale prices. We're recording this in mid-January. We encourage you to get out there soon because there are great deals coming.

Now, let's turn this week's guest expert, Victoria Crispo. Victoria Crispo is manager of career content at Idealist Careers and author of the "Ask Victoria" advice column, where she answers questions for social change job seekers and career changers. Before joining Idealist.org, Victoria helped non-profit job seekers as a resume writer, career coach, and in higher education. Victoria, thanks for joining us today.

Victoria Crispo:  

Thank you so much for having me, Mac. Great to be here.

Mac Prichard:

It's a pleasure to have you on the show. We're recording in January, and a topic that is on many people's minds are resolutions for the new year. It's also a subject that I think has relevance throughout the year. Let's talk about New Years resolutions, Victoria, and let's go straight to the dark side. Why don't most New Years resolutions work for job seekers, career managers, and just people in general?

Victoria Crispo:  

Sure. I think that there are a couple of important points to keep in mind, actually even before you even start to make the resolution, which will then cause it to be a lot easier to keep. One of those aspects that I think can really help is making sure that the goal that you craft, the resolution that you're trying to achieve, is something that is very specific and also measurable. The measurable piece is important because you want to be able to have a way to know that you're progress and that you are actually making change and seeing improvement. That's definitely one area that is really important as you think about not just keeping your resolution, but the first part is how to create a resolution that you will be able to keep and the other things that are involved in that.

Mac Prichard:  

Let's unpack that for our listeners, because I imagine many people are thinking, "Okay. This is the year I want to get a new job." They write that down. How do they make that measurable and specific, Victoria?

Victoria Crispo:   

Actually, almost just what you said, unpack it a little bit. What are the other details that are going to be involved in getting that job? That might require doing a little bit of research and reflection. First, figuring out what type of job do you want? Beyond that, what are the things that you need in order to get that job? It might involve taking a look at job descriptions that relate to that type of work. What are the responsibilities that are involved? Have you done that type of work before? What are the skills that are necessary? Do you have those skills, or do you have other ones that might be able to serve as a supplement?

In regards to having something that's measurable, it might require having some additional steps before you get to that main resolution of, "I want a new job for 2016." For example, if you see a job description that you're really interested in, and there is a requirement for a certain skill, whether it's computer skills, social media management, whatever it might be, if it's a skill that you don't have, start thinking about what is it that you need to do to get yourself on track and make sure that the resolution that you've developed for yourself is something that you can actually achieve in the time frame that you've given yourself.

Mac Prichard:   

Okay. Define what that job is, find out what the typical title might be, look for examples of specific job postings that you might see online on job boards or elsewhere, then identify the skills that are required to do that work, and think about the gaps that you might have than employer might see and how you might address those gaps.

Victoria Crispo:   

Absolutely.

Mac Prichard:  

Okay. You need to be clear about what you want. What are some of the other steps that people need to take in setting these career resolutions?

Victoria Crispo:    

Absolutely. Be clear about what you want and the steps that you may not have thought about beforehand that you'll need to get there. I think it's definitely helpful to build in smaller tasks along the way, things that you can use as milestones, reasons for celebration. You are your best judge as to what that means for you. I can certainly give some examples, but it might be gaining entry into a specific area by volunteering and maybe developing a really great relationship with your volunteer manager, which perhaps then leads to an informational interview with someone else, who can take you to the next step. Having a good idea of what success might look like and also knowing that it might not be the exact picture of what you might think, and how to really determine that you are staying on track. Developing some little, smaller tasks that kind of show you that green light of, "Yes. I'm on the right path. I'm getting someplace," are things that you can celebrate, those little, the small victories that you can celebrate and feel good that you're getting to where you want to go.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah. Baby steps can pay off. As you move forward, even though it might be in an incremental way, you'll see the progress. Reading your blog before the show, I know you've talked a lot about the importance and the value of having accountability partners. Tell us about the difference an accountability partner can make in setting these kinds of resolutions or in job hunting in general.

Victoria Crispo: 

I know, for myself personally, I love having someone who I can speak to about the things that I'm looking to do, and someone who is giving me that metaphorical tap on the shoulder of, "Oh, hey. Did you ... ? How are things going with x, y, z?" It is so, so helpful to have someone there in your corner who is able to just be a person who you can check in with and help you evaluate whether you're still on-task. Of course, it doesn't mean that you're going to necessarily take a lot of time out from this other individual. It can be very quick emails. Let's say you, as well, are a writer, and one of your goals is to develop a personal/professional portfolio that showcases the type of work that you do. You might, for example, share a link with your accountability partner.

It can be a very informal, yet scheduled arrangement, where maybe you check in once a week or once every other week, but that there is someone there who can attest to, "Yes. You said you were going to do x, y, z, and you did it." I have definitely found that to be helpful in the past. In fact, there are sites that exist, I don't know if you're familiar with Stikk.com?

Mac Prichard:   

No. Tell us about that.

Victoria Crispo:  

Sure. It's actually Stikk with two k's. It is a way for individuals to set a goal, set the time that they are expecting to complete that goal, and they can set up a referee. That would be, in essence, you accountability partner. If you like, you can also have financial stakes in the game for when you accomplish your goal. I believe it's set up so that you can have that money go to a charity, the charity of your choice. You can also do the opposite, so if you miss your goal, you can have it sent to a charity that you really don't want to support. Therein lies and even deeper blow. (laughs)

Mac Prichard:   

All right. Well, that can be motivating.

Victoria Crispo:  

Absolutely.

Mac Prichard: 

Yeah. I've certainly had good experience with accountability partners. I remember during one job search, there was a friend I would call. This was a long time ago because we were still looking at newspaper classified ads. When the Sunday paper came out, we would call each other and say, "Okay. I saw this position. I saw that position. I'm going to apply for this one or that one." Just that weekly call was very affirming, and it was nice to have that connection. I'm sure you've had this experience too. I've had colleagues who've had good success with job support groups, groups of people who meet together to just keep each other updated on their progress, but also to set goals and exchange tips and other information.

Victoria Crispo:   

Definitely. It's so helpful to have that. I know there are some local job search support groups around here that have been really beneficial for the members. If there's not an in-person group in your area, there may be one online that you can join. That, too, can be effective, if it's a place where you can check in via email or in an online group. I definitely recommend that, as well.

Mac Prichard:  

Okay. Let's talk about mistakes you see people make that they should avoid when setting New Years resolutions for their careers. What stands out for you, Victoria?

Victoria Crispo:

I think the main things that stand out are again, not really doing that leg work beforehand of really discovering whether it's something that you can achieve in the time frame that you've given yourself. In some cases, it might be that there are, again, additional steps that you need to take in order to get to where you want to see yourself next. I think that that is definitely one of the bigger quote mistakes that I see, is not really factoring in some of the other things that might come into play as you're doing the work. I think the other mistake is, while it's great to have a goal, definitely building in some leeway for yourself and not beating yourself up too hard if you don't in fact make it by your set time. Job search is only one part of life. In fact, it's all of the other aspects of living.

If you look at it in a holistic way, all of the other things that affect life, your relationships, your health, et cetera, do have a place in what happens in your job search as well. Sometimes, the drawback that a job seeker may have when they're trying to meet a resolution that they've set for themselves is forgetting those other aspects that come into play and that sometimes you may need to account for unexpected things that come up in life. Just because you haven't necessarily met your goal exactly doesn't mean that you haven't gone any distance whatsoever. I think that seeing those changes and improvements in your life, even if you haven't necessarily gone exactly where you expected to be is something that should be considered, too.

Mac Prichard:   

In summary, be specific, break your tasks down into small, manageable pieces, and be kind to yourself. Realize that you're not going to get it done in one day or one month, but you will make progress if you're focused, over the course of a year.

Victoria Crispo: 

Definitely.

Mac Prichard:   

Victoria, what's coming up next for you and your organization, Idealist.org?

Victoria Crispo:                 

Sure. Next month, we will be running an email-based course called find your fit. I definitely encourage anyone who might be interested in exploring their passions and figuring out where they want to go next professionally to sign up. It is a free course, and we will be making the announcement on our site, IdealistCareers.org, and also, of course, on our email list, which you can subscribe to on IdealistCareers.org.

Mac Prichard:  

Thank you, Victoria, and it's been a pleasure having you on the show.

Victoria Crispo:

Thank you very much, Mac. It's been great talking with you.

Mac Prichard:   

To learn more about Idealist, there are 2 great web pages you can explore. The first one is IdealistCareers.org, that's all one word. IdealistCareers.org. When you go there, you'll find career resources and tools. Idealist has a wonderful job board with, actually, thousands of listings. You can find those at Idealist.org. Victoria is on Twitter, and her Twitter handle is @AskVictoria. We'll be sure to put all of these links in the show notes.

We're back in the Mac's List studio. I'm sitting here with Ben and Cecilia. What did you 2 think of the conversation with Victoria? What were some of the key takeaways for you?

Cecilia Bianco: 

Well, the main takeaway I got, I really like her point about breaking down your goal into steps so you can really determine if it's unrealistic or realistic for you to achieve that goal, and then edit it from there.

Ben Forstag:  

I thought her point about accountability partners was so important, not only so that you've got someone providing some oversight for you and making sure you're staying true to yourself and your goals, but also just so you're not doing this by yourself, right? Sometimes you need another person to share your frustrations or your triumphs with. I think having an accountability partner like that is a great idea.

Mac Prichard:  

I agree. One of the things that I think is surprising to many job seekers, particularly people who have been unemployed for a while, and I certainly have been there. I've gone through 2 long periods of unemployment, is in my case, I'd began to think I didn't have a lot to offer. We all have a lot to offer. We all have lots of experiences and skills, and helping somebody else by being that accountability partner is one of the most important things I think we can do.

Okay. Well, thank you all for joining us and holding us accountable to our weekly production schedule. We'll be back next Wednesday with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job. In the meantime, please visit us at MacsList.org, and you can sign up for our free newsletter there. It's published every Tuesday, with more than a hundred new jobs every week.

If you like what you hear on the show, you can help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. I've recently read that more than 80% of podcast listeners find shows on iTunes. By leaving a rating and review, you help us rise in the iTunes rankings, get in front of more job seekers, and help more people. Thanks for your help, and thanks for listening.

 



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BONUS: How to Get an Oregon Government Job (Mac Prichard)


Mon, Jan 25, 2016


Government jobs are always tough to land. Mastering the oft-byzantine formal application process takes practice and insider know-how. In this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, Mac Prichard shares his experience applying for government jobs. Mac has worked in multiple departments for the State of Oregon, as well as for several local and state-level elected officials.

Mac reads "How To Get An Oregon Government Job", his contribution to the Mac's List book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). And while he speaks primarily about his experience in Oregon, the practical lessons Mac shares are generally applicable to any government job, whether at the federal, state or local level.

If you’re looking for more advice on developing a brand that attracts employers, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). The 2016 edition, available February 1, includes new content and will be available on a wide range of e-reading devices, including Kindle, Nook and iBooks. You will even be able to order a paperback edition!

To learn more, sign-up for our ebook mailing list at www.macslist.org/book. When you join this list, we'll send you publication updates, insider ebook content, and special pre-sale price discounts.

Make 2016 the year you land your dream job!

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

 



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Ep. 018: Advancing Your Career Through Collaboration (Kare Anderson)


Wed, Jan 20, 2016


You will find competitors in whatever career you choose. No matter how small or niche your field, some people always stand out in your profession.  Education, experience and other advantages contribute to these people’s success, but how you lead you work life can makes a huge difference, too.

One of the best ways to stand out in your field and in your career is through creative collaboration. Embracing mutuality--sharing of your strengths, acknowledging your weaknesses and partnering with others with complementary skill sets--strengthens your professional credentials in an increasingly interconnected economy. And people who can facilitate collaboration are best positioned to solve employers’ most pressing challenges.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, our guest expert is Kare Anderson, Emmy-winning journalist, TED presenter, and author of Mutuality Matters and Moving from Me to We. Kare believes that collaborative problem solving is the key to a dynamic, engaging and impactful career. She shares her thoughts on how to improve mutuality and the value of team collaboration.

In this 32-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why collaboration is a valuable, in-demand skill in the modern workplace
  • How to leverage your professional networks to facilitate collaboration
  • How to embrace mutuality as a tool for networking and job-hunting
  • Tips for improving your teamwork skills--even if you’re an introvert
  • Communications tools to facilitate collaboration

This week’s guest:

Kare Anderson (@KareAnderson | LinkedIn)
Journalist and Speaker
Author, Moving from Me to We, Mutuality Matters, and more
San Francisco, Calif.

Listener question of the week:

  • Is it a bad idea to accept a job working for or with family members or friends? What should I consider before accepting?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Cecilia Bianco, Mac’s List Community Manager at cecilia@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Mac Prichard: 

This is Find Your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you hired, have the career you want, and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard, your host, and publisher of Mac's List. Our show is brought to you by Mac's List and by our book, "Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond)." To learn more about the book and the new edition that we're publishing February 1, please visit macslist.org/ebook.

Whatever career you choose, you'll find competitors, no matter how small or crowed your field may be, some people always stand out in your profession. Education, experience and other advantages play a part in these people's success, but how you lead your work life can make a huge difference, too. This week on Find Your Dream Job, we're talking about how you can advance your career by combining your strengths with the complementary skills of others. Our guest expert this week is Kare Anderson. She and I will talk about specific steps you can take in your professional life to break out of the pack.

Ben Forstag has several online tools you can use to improve your teamwork skills, and Cecilia Bianco tackles the question that comes up in every workplace: Should you hire family and friends? We're in the Mac's List studio, and I'm here with Cecilia and Ben. First of all, Ben, welcome back from your paternity leave.

Ben Forstag:  

Thank you.

Mac Prichard: 

Congratulations on the new son.

Ben Forstag: 

Thank you. Little Fox, as we call him, is doing very well.

Mac Prichard:   

I love that acronym.

Well, it's a pleasure to have you back. Now, when you two think about peers you've had, either at school or in the workplace or elsewhere, who've stood out, what have you seen them do?

Cecilia Bianco:

I think the biggest thing that stands out to me is how engaged someone is in their field. If someone's really focused on attending events, workshops, and joining the right groups for their career, I think that goes a long way to making them stand out.

Ben Forstag:   

One thing that I've seen that I really like is people who maintain active and high quality blogs. I think this is so important because it shows a dedication. This is something you do weekly or on a regular basis. It positions you as a subject matter expert regardless of how big or small that subject is. It's quite notable when you are the subject matter expert on it. Third, it is a showcase for good quality writing. I think those things are so important, and it's just a great way to position yourself with employers and other professional prospects.

Mac Prichard:   

I think the common denominator that runs through both of the examples that you two have shared, and they're great examples, is a topic that our guest is going to talk about this week, which is the importance of giving to others. She has a book that we'll talk about, "Mutuality," but the idea is this that by helping others and being part of a community, whether it's by writing a blog or participating in professional groups and/or going to events, you're giving of yourself, and you're thinking about the needs of others and how you can help. First, let's turn to you, Ben. I know you have a resource for our listeners this week. What have you found?

Ben Forstag:    

This week I want to share three blog posts all about the importance of teamwork. When I say that word I know some people are rolling their eyes, and other people are getting great big smiles. Teamwork is one of these clich?d words that really divides people. What do you think Cecilia? Are you a teamwork person, or a work alone person?

Cecilia Bianco:

I'm more of a teamwork person. I think, as you said, it's become really important in today's work market. Almost all of our listings have that listed as a qualification: How do you work on a team?

Mac Prichard:  

I enjoy teamwork, too. I have to say when I was in graduate school, I got a lot out of that experience. One of the most important gifts I got was they had us work in study groups, and I had not done that as an undergraduate. That gave me the experience to work with others and helping others in the group, and I found I got a lot more out of my education as a result.

Ben Forstag: 

I'm of two minds when it comes to teamwork. Part of me really sees the value in it. It's undeniable that this is a skill that employers are looking for. I would guess that ninety-five percent of every job description that we get here at Mac's List includes teamwork as one of the things they're looking for. At the same time, when I was in graduate school, team projects were always those projects where I thought, "Oh man, now I've got to do extra work to cover up for other people." It's something that I'm always working on, and I know I can improve on. That's why I thought this was an interesting topic. It also feeds into what we talked about earlier about working with others and giving to others in a team environment.

The first post I want to share comes from the Lifehack blog, and it's called the "10 Things Good Team Players Do Differently." As Cecilia mentioned terms like teamwork and team player are often used so much they lose all of their meaning. I really liked this post because it outlines some basic behaviors that make someone a good team participant. Here are the ten attributes of team players according to the blog: They're reliable. They're unafraid of failure. They share information. They say what they think. They don't dominate meetings. They stay positive. They understand and respect team dynamics. They know when to say "no." They are adept at problem solving. They go the extra mile.

This all sounds great, Mac, right? This is exactly the kind of person you want to hire.

Mac Prichard:  

Right.

Ben Forstag:   

If I had any criticism of this blog piece, it might be that this sounds like the ideal person. A good team player is a just a great listener, does everything right. I do like it because they are concrete things to think about, and how you behave in the office, and how you work with your colleagues. Just things to keep in the back of your mind about how you could improve your relations and your productivity with others.

If you heard that list and you thought that doesn't sound like me at all, my next resource is for you. This is a post entitled, "The Introvert's Guide to Surviving Teamwork, and it comes from the Psychology Today blog. As I mentioned earlier, I actually consider myself something of an introvert, and I know how difficult it can be to assert yourself in a group setting. I like this post because it outlines some mindsets and skill sets and deliberative practices you can use to become an effective team leader.

The general idea here is that introverts play an essentially role in effective teams. You're needed for the team to be effective, and the role you play as an introvert is being the level-headed listener, the aggregator of good ideas, and the implementer of group decisions. I love this quote from the blog. The author writes, "Extroverts love to talk, but are much less enthused about having to walk away and do the work. This is the introvert's chance to shine. You can be the one who puts your hand up and to work on a project offline." I think that's an important thing to keep in mind because teamwork requires different kinds of people. If it's just a bunch of talkers, nothing is going to get done.

Lastly I want to share a blog for how you can talk about your teamwork skills with a prospective employer. As I was thinking about this subject yesterday, it really struck me that what a challenge it is to illustrate your skills as a team player in the interview process, because in most of the things we're doing in an interview is trying to show how great ... like you're the number one guy, you're the expert in everything, you have all the answers, and teamwork is not one of these skills where being the guy with all the answers is an asset. That's often a liability.

This post had some interesting answers on how you can answer behavioral questions related to teamwork. It comes from the biginterview.com blog. I'll have the URLs for all these blog posts in the show notes. It's a very long post, but it includes some sample interview questions around teamwork, discusses why employers are asking these questions, and provides some strategies on how you can best answer these questions in a way that shows the skills you have as a team player without bragging, without going over the top, and really presenting yourself as an ideal candidate for their needs.

Cecilia Bianco:

Your point about focusing on behavioral interview questions I think is really important because if you're trying to act like a team player in an interview, the best way to do that is through examples, so being prepared with examples that show you're a team player is a great way to go.

Mac Prichard:   

I think your point, too, Ben, about how in interviews there's a tendency to try to please the prospective employer by saying I can do everything and I'm a star in everything. I think smart employers know they're not going to get a hundred percent of everything that's in a job description, and a candidate can't do everything. I think it's important for candidates to remember that, because if they are hired, they will be part of a team. They will have strengths that they can bring to that group, but they can't do everything. If they're managers themselves or they become managers one day, they're going to recognize the value of being able to identify strengths in others, and draw people out in those strengths, and give them opportunities to display them.

Ben Forstag:      

Really, that's the value of teamwork essentially. It's a way to maximize people's strengths and cover up their weaknesses by combining compatible strengths and collaborating that way. Before I leave I just want to share this one awesome quote that I came across. It's about the value of teamwork, and this comes from Bill Gates. He said, "Creativity is less of an individual characteristic than it is an emergent property that surfaces when people convene around a problem." I think that kind of gets at the heart of why most employers nowadays want you to be a good team player because it helps you come up with unique, good solutions to problems that individuals by themselves can't figure out.

Mac Prichard: 

I think together a team is stronger and an organization is better for it. Well, thank you Ben. Ben is always looking for suggestions, and he's always thrilled when he hears from people who have ideas for him, so please write him. You can reach him at ben@macslist.org. Now let's turn to you, our listeners. It's time to hear from Cecilia Bianco, our community manager. She's going to reach deep and far into the mailbag, and pull out this week's question. Cecilia, what do you have for us this week?

Cecilia Bianco:

Actually our question this week came from Twitter, not the mailbag, and it's, "Is it a bad idea to accept a job working for or with family members or friends? What should I consider before accepting?" I personally worked at a family business, and I know it can definitely create tension among other employees. There's a lot to consider and talk about before you accept the job. The most important thing you can get do is set boundaries with the family member or friend before you actually take the job. Ben, I know you've worked with family before, too. What ground rules did you have in place to make it a successful experience?

Ben Forstag:  

A few years ago I was working at a nonprofit, and my father actually got hired by the nonprofit as a consultant to do some sales work for them. It was a tense situation, but we made it work, and mostly because we had a couple informal rules. One of them was when he started I made it clear that I had no managerial authority over him, and he had no managerial authority over me. We worked in two separate departments and had two separate people that we reported to, which helped.

I also removed myself from pretty much any decision that had to do with what he was doing. You're not always able to do this in an organization. Fortunately in the organization I was with there were enough other people that could pick up the slack, and I could step out of some conversations simply because I just didn't want to be involved with that piece.

Then the third one, and I think this is the most important, is I made a deal with my father. We weren't going to talk about work when we weren't at work. I think it's important to have a work life and a private life. If your private life turns into a second work life because all the same people are in both camps, you lose that area to decompress and to relax. Off hours we didn't talk about work. If he had a complaint about work or I had a complaint about work, we didn't talk about it to each other. We just pretended that that didn't exist. It was a unique situation, and we made it work. I think it really depends on your own specific circumstances, though, of whether it's a viable option.

Cecilia Bianco:

Those are all great suggestions. I think the most important main thing to consider is if you're confident that you and the family member or friend in question can treat each other as you would any other coworker or boss. Knowing everything you know about them, as I'm sure you know your father very well, are you going to be able to put aside that knowledge and treat them unbiasedly? Especially once office conflict comes up or any situations arise, you want to be able to treat them like you would a coworker that you haven't known your whole life. Mac, have you ever worked with a family member?

Mac Prichard:  

I have. My dad had rental properties from many years. He would hire my brother and I and I think my sisters as well to paint apartments, move tenants and put up wallpaper. I wasn't good at any of those things. My sister, Katie, is a star at wallpaper, and she is still papering walls decades later. We all had jobs, but we tended to ... After a stint with my dad, I worked in restaurants or in other places.

Cecilia Bianco:

Was it a good experience or a bad?

Mac Prichard: 

It was a good experience. He was basically a small business owner, running his rental properties. Being part of that, going with him, watching him work with tenants, deal with leases, purchase properties, work with realtors, he brought us all along, and we got to watch that firsthand and participate in it. I think we learned some valuable lessons as a result.

Cecilia Bianco:

In that situation it sounds like it was beneficial because you were probably given a little bit more opportunity to learn since it was your father who was the boss rather than maybe another boss.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah. I certainly learned from my other jobs in high school and college, but I think a family member is always going to take more of an interest in a relative, a child or other relative. Many families, I think, want to see their kid succeed in that business as well, and so they want to make that happen.

Cecilia Bianco:

That makes sense. Two different situations but the same answer. It's okay to accept a job from a family member. Our main point of advice is just to sit down, and get those ground rules in place, and make sure you're on the same page about how you want the work relationship to go.

Mac Prichard: 

Well, thanks Cecilia. If you've got a question for Cecilia, you can send it to her via Twitter and also by email. Her email address is cecilia@macslist.org. Cecilia, for the benefit for our listeners who on Twitter, how can they reach you via your Twitter handle?

Cecilia Bianco:

They can tweet @Macs_list, or they can tweet me personally @Ceciliamfbianco.

Mac Prichard:   

These segments by Ben and Cecilia are sponsored by the 2016 edition of our book, "Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond)." We're taking a complete Mac's List guide and making it even better. We're adding new content, and we're publishing the book on multiple eReader platforms. There's a new version of the book coming in February of this year, February 1 actually. For the first time you'll be able to access "Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond)" on your Kindle, your Nook, your iPad and other digital devices. Up till now it's just been available as a PDF. Now for the first time you'll be able to get a paperback edition. Whatever the format, our goal is the same, to give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work. To learn more, go to our website. Visit macslist.org/ebook, and you can sign up for our eBook newsletter. We sending out publication updates now, and we're sharing exclusive book content. We're also providing pre-sale prices that are available right now.

Let's turn to this week's guest expert. Kare Anderson is a public speaker, author of "Mutuality Matters" and other books, and an Emmy award-winning, NBC and Wall Street Journal reporter who now writes for Forbes and Huffington Post. Kare's TED talk called The Web of Humanity: Becoming an Opportunity Maker has attracted more than 1.7 million views. Her diverse set of clients includes Salesforce, Novartis and Skoll Foundation. Kare, thanks for joining us.

Kare Anderson:

I'm honored. We share an interest in making our work serve the greater good.

Mac Prichard:   

I appreciate having that bond with you. I've been very impressed reading your blog over the years about your writing about the importance of human connection, and how much it matters to us all, and what a difference it can make in our careers. One of the topics that you've addressed is how people can stand out in their job search, at work, or in their career by making the most of their social connections. Tell us more about that Kare.

Kare Anderson:   

I believe it not only makes your life more nourishing, but you stand out when you cultivate relationships with people who have adjacent talents to yours and when you cite and praise the thought leaders and the people in your line of work, your profession, your industry or company. Whenever you shine a spotlight specifically praising people for actions they took, especially in front of people who matter to them, you shine too. I think people notice you. It's always nice to have people offer you a job before you're looking for it even if you don't want it, and that's one way to do that.

Mac Prichard: 

I think many people will hope that will happen, that someone will approach them and offer them a job. That might happen by posting a resume or a profile on LinkedIn, or getting in touch with an executive recruiter. They just have to sit back and wait for that call, but in your writing you have a different perspective. You say that you can make that happen but there are steps that people have to take. Can you tell us more about that?

Kare Anderson:  

One of them is I believe in clarity and specificity. The more you're clear and specific on your talents, and the flip side where you're not, the more you might see situations, markets that people are trying to serve, new markets they might be entering, what's missing in their company that might leverage more value or visibility to their current customers and prospects. Then when you do that writing about those situations, if you're prone to writing, is helpful or citing them.

When you're talking to customers say, "Just as so and so does this and this company does this, we fill in the gap in between, and we think we want to meet the high standard they do," specifically citing the benefits of companies that you might want to be in or how [to serve 00:19:30] situations makes people more aware of you. I think it's good to also be proactive and be on the lookout for leaders of companies that you admire and say, "That's a company I like. I like what they're doing. I like the way they do that. I wonder if there's a way my talents could serve them." So there are ways to be proactive, but also, of course, ways to be clear and concrete and specific when you're being interviewed.

Mac Prichard:   

Tell us more about examples of that. If someone goes to a professional association, they see people who are those kinds of leaders you described a moment ago, and they think they can be of help to them, or they're not sure how they can be of help. Let's break that into two parts. First of all, they know they want to be of service to someone. How can they figure out how they could be beneficial to them, and then how might they do that?

Kare Anderson:  

First of all, learn a little bit about ... that person does well or something where you think there's a gap for them, and when you're at a conference or a social gathering say, "I've long admired your capacity to do this. I wonder if we could talk a bit about it because I have a shared interest in serving that market or in that situation, and I want to give you some suggestions and see what you thought of them. I'd love your candid advice frankly." What if ...? If they say that, say, "What about this? What if we did that?"

Recently I'm a big fan of analytics [geeks 00:20:56] for example. I think there's certain occupations where there's growth, and they're certainly one of them. If they say "I notice you have a great product. I notice that you get a lot of good testimonials. That shows that you're doing a lot of things right. Would you be interested in exploring how to understand more deeply the profile of the kind of customer you serve, the traits they have in common both as it relates to your product but also in other parts of their life?"

For example, I found out a team I work with of analytics geeks that surgeons happen to like fine wine and male surgeons especially. They also like certain lines of clothing when they're out of the hospital. So when the analytics said we've found this out about the profile of the customers you're serving, these surgeons, can we propose that we join with your marketing people to find efficient ways to reach them in other unexpected places and to perhaps partner with some of the organizations that reach them in those situations so you can stand out more? So they were coming at it differently.

Or thinking about a nursery. I'm working with a nursery. There's five outlets. I suggested to them stand out, not only sell plants but offer three options to keep your business growing. Offer to sell the service of people who will plant the plants for them, whether it's for an individual organization or to create a landscape design that can go with the plants and/or provide regular maintenance plus suggestions of when to add what kinds of plants to their business landscaping or their home. That way the person offering that, they may be a landscaper, they may be someone who's just seeking more work at a basic level planting plants. I admire the people saying, "Let me help you differentiate your product by what I can do to help you. So that was just two examples.

Mac Prichard:   

Those are great examples. What I like about those as you were talking is that you're thinking about the needs of the person you want to help.

Kare Anderson: 

Yes.

Mac Prichard:   

You have the services they might require. Whether it's you're running a business and you're trying to identify the needs of potential or current clients and how you might need them, or you're looking for work and you want connect with a potential employer, it all comes back to the needs of the person you want to have that relationship with, and how you can help meet them.

Kare Anderson: 

That's very well put. I call it triangling, triangle talk. First referring to you, say, "Is this an interest of yours?" or "I noticed you're doing this. Am I on target? May we talk about something a way I think ...? I know a person who could help you or I could." So it's you, me and then us, which is increasingly rare in our culture by the way.

Mac Prichard:  

I think making those connections with others and being a kind of broker can make a huge difference. You've written about the work of Adam Grant, a professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, about the value of giving to others without any expectation of getting something in return. You've talked about that in your book, "Mutuality." Can you tell us more about the book, the main idea? I know you've got some practical steps in that book that you share with readers about how they can act on that idea.

Kare Anderson:    

I'd be glad to. One of the things that's important about Adam is he said givers are among the least and most successful, so it's how you give. Because one of my hot buttons, which I'm trying to work on, are people who are unhelpful givers. They give something that clearly demonstrates they don't really know you, and so you try to act genial back. But in "Mutuality Matters" I believe the future in our increasingly connected world is to cultivate relationships with people of complementary talents around sweet spots of mutual interests. The more you do that you'll have more lenses on a situation. You can innovate faster. You can see an opportunity or solve a problem better.

In that attitude you don't do it just when there's a crisis. You do it ahead of time. You can, in effect, becomes what Joe Calloway calls a 'category of one,' where you're the only person that combines a strength, that's somewhat unique, with a network of people where you can call on them, and they will call on you. It's not quid pro quo, but it's an ebb and flow of mutuality over time. Thus you can stand out wherever you are at any level of a large company or small one.

That's why I like intranets, by the way, for companies because an intranet is a internet within a company. A lot of them ... badly designed so it looks like more work, but when it's done right, and this just makes my heart sing, when you can ask for help internally from each other, you see who keeps asking for help but doesn't ever get asked for help, and you see who's the most helpful. Again going back to Adam, he said it's not leaders we should look for in an organization, but who offers the most helpful assist most often. They provide the assistance that people want. They add the missing link. They help become the glue that holds groups together. That, I think, is increasingly what individuals need and organizations need to stay agile.

Doing that is in your enlightened self-interest. I also think it makes for less conflict and more conviviality when you're speaking to a part of someone saying, "You can do this." Like I'm a fast thinker. My business partner's a slow thinker. Doesn't mean one's smart and dumb. I'm an extrovert. In some situation he's an introvert. We're now realizing the reverse may true. But we can do and see things that the other person can't and vice versa. That's my wordy way of saying why I like mutuality. It also makes it fun because you say, "Oh my gosh, I never would have thought of that.

Mac Prichard: 

Our skills and our weaknesses can complement others when we're part of a team. I wanted to get back to your book. You had talked about specific ways in the book that people can promote mutuality. Can you tell us more about some of those steps?

Kare Anderson: 

I think the first thing in promoting mutuality is to speak to the side of someone you most like and admire, especially when they're not demonstrating it, because it's not how people feel about us when they first meet us. It's how they feel about themselves. I think [citing 00:27:47] to two or three other people, one of my favorites, a thing that three unexpected allies could do together around a sweet spot means they often will like the experience they have on one action, and they'll like you for making it happen. Those are two ways to spur mutuality and where they're more likely to be pulled toward you and think of you. If you give enough other people what they need in their life, you often get what you need, even before you know you need it, from people you sometimes didn't think could provide it. I think that makes for a productive and satisfying life [in 00:28:20] mutuality.

Mac Prichard:   

I think that's well said. Well, we'll include links to your book and to the two authors you mentioned as well. Thank you for joining us today, Kare.

Kare Anderson:   

I thoroughly enjoyed it, and I love your notion online of work backwards. I call it reverse engineering. Have that end goal in mind for you and your team.

Mac Prichard:  

Well, thank you. You can find Kare online at her blog, Moving From Me To We and at her website sayitbetter.com. We'll include links to both of these sites in the show notes. Thank you again for joining us today, Kare.

Kare Anderson:   

I was honored Mac. Thank you and thank the team.

Mac Prichard:  

We're back in the Mac's List studio with Ben and Cecilia. What do you two think? What are some of the important points you heard Kare make?

Ben Forstag: 

I really liked the idea that she put out there that there's a huge professional value to networks, and not just for advancing your own career but as a service in and of themselves. One of the key ideas here is that your unique skills and your ability to bring in other people with their own unique and complementary skill sets, that's a huge asset for a professional for solving problems on the fly. It's something, frankly, we don't think about our networks like that very often, but we should.

Mac Prichard: 

I agree with you Ben. I think each of us is a kind of impresario or broker person who knows lots of people with skills and can bring folks together to solve problems. When we do that, it does create opportunities for us.

Ben Forstag:   

And there's a value-added for being that person who can bring everyone else together.

Mac Prichard:  

Right.

Cecilia Bianco:

Your last point, that's what I took away from the most, thinking about who's the most helpful around you. If you are that person that's providing the most value and help, then you really stand out and are someone people are always thinking about.

Ben Forstag:  

I liked her point also about ... she called it intranets, and a lot of organizations have those, but there's also a lot of communications tools out there. One is called Slack. It's like a chat tool that organizations use so their teams can collaborate openly. The idea that when you put it out there into your network that, "I need help with problem X" and other folks jump and address that problem for you, that mutuality there, that give and take of each person contributing their unique skills, that's where the magic happens. The more we can facilitate that process through technology and through our own willingness to embrace that, the better results we're going to have both professional, personally and for our organizations.

Cecilia Bianco:

I agree. As Kare said, it definitely makes your work life a little bit more fun.

Mac Prichard:  

Well, thank you both, and thank you our listeners. We'll be back next week with more tools and tips you can use to find that dream job. In the meantime visit us at macslist.org where you can sign up for our free newsletter. It comes out every Tuesday, and there are more than a hundred new jobs every week. If you like what you hear on the show, please let us know by taking a moment to visit iTunes and leave a rating and review. The benefit of that is that it helps us help others because the more ratings and reviews we receive, the higher we rise in the iTunes charts, and the more people learn about the show. Thank you for listening.



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Ep. 017: The Social Media Job Search (Joshua Waldman)


Wed, Jan 13, 2016


According to one estimate, 80% of employers Google candidates before inviting someone in for a job interview. What will people see when they Google you? Photos from your college spring break trip to Mexico or an up-to-date LinkedIn page? What impression will you create online? That you’re the life of the party or an accomplished professional?

Using social media in your job hunt isn’t only about playing defense. Facebook and other personal accounts can make a big positive difference in your career.

This week on “Find Your Dream Job” Mac talks with Joshua Waldman, CEO and founder of Career Enlightenment, about how to use social media in your job search. Joshua is the author of Job Searching With Social Media For Dummies, and he’s also written for Forbes, Huffington Post, Mashable and the International Business Times. Joshua’s career blog, CareerEnlightenment.com, won the About.com Reader’s Choice Award for Best Career Blog 2013. When he’s not writing, Joshua presents keynotes, trainings and breakout sessions around the world.

In this 28-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why your online profiles matter
  • Tactics to leverage LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter in your job search and career
  • How to improve your online profiles and use them effectively
  • Common mistakes professionals make with social media
  • How to appropriately send “cold call” requests on LinkedIn
  • A free tool to clean-up your social media accounts

This week’s guest:

Joshua Waldman (@joshuawaldman | LinkedIn)
CEO & Founder
Career Enlightenment
Portland, Ore.

Listener question of the week:

  • I'm thinking about asking to connect with someone on LinkedIn. The problem is -- I've never actually met them. Is this ok to do?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Cecilia Bianco, Mac’s List Community Manager at cecilia@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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Ep. 016: How to Ace a Job Interview (Janet Brumbaugh)


Wed, Jan 06, 2016


“Wing it” and “job interview” are two phrases that should never go together in the same sentence. Before you walk into an interview, you need to prepare yourself, do your homework, and practice what you will do and say.

But how do you prepare responses when you don’t know the questions? And what, besides having good answers, contributes to a successful interview?

This week on Find Your Dream Job we talk about the interview process and share tips on making a great in-person impression with a prospective employer. Mac chats with executive recruiter and career coach, Janet Brumbaugh, of Janet Brumbaugh and Associates. Janet helps her clients hone their interview skills by video-recording them in mock-interviews; she then reviews the tape with the jobseeker, to identify mistakes and opportunities for improvement. In this episode, Janet shares her expert advice on how to your own interview performance and outcomes.

In this 33-minute episode you will learn:

  • The specific research you should do before an interview
  • What employers are looking for during the interview process
  • How to make the interview less of an interrogation and more of a back-and-forth conversation
  • The questions you, as the candidate, should be asking at the interview
  • How to respond to oddball interview questions

This week’s guest:

Janet Brumbaugh (LinkedIn)
Principal
Janet Brumbaugh and Associates
West Lynn, Ore.

Listener question of the week: 

  • What questions should I ask an employer in an interview?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Cecilia Bianco, Mac’s List Community Manager at cecilia@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.



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BONUS: Portland's Threads--And Yours (Aubrie DeClerck)


Mon, Jan 04, 2016


HAPPY NEW YEAR! We hope you all had a festive holiday season and that you're staring 2016 re-energized to build the career of your dreams!

To kick off the new calendar year, the Mac's List team is sharing a bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, featuring one of our most popular guests, Aubrie De Clerck of Portland-based Coaching for Clarity.

In this 3-minute episode, Aubrie reads "Portland's Threads--and Yours", her contribution to the Mac's List ebook, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

If you’re looking for more advice on developing a brand that attracts employers, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). The 2016 edition, available February 1, includes new content and will be available on a wide range of e-reading devices, including Kindle, Nook and iBooks. You will even be able to order a paperback edition!

To learn more, sign-up for our ebook mailing list at www.macslist.org/ebook. When you join this list, we'll send you publication updates, insider ebook content, and special pre-sale price discounts.

Make 2016 the year you land your dream job!

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Mac Prichard:   

This is Find Your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want, and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac's List.

On this bonus episode of Find Your Dream Job, we're bringing back one of our most popular guests, Aubrie De Clerck of Coaching For Clarity. Aubrie is included as one of the local job search experts in Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond), and in today's episode, she'll share her contribution to the book with you, our podcast listeners.

Here's Aubrie De Clerck reading "Portland's Threads--and Yours", from Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond).

Aubrie DeClerck:

In any search, it's up to us to tell our story: Who we are, what we can do, and how we stand out in doing it. Our story is not simply about identifying transferable skills. To find fulfilling work, we need to communicate our threads, the things we're best at, the things we can't stop doing even if we try, the things we do naturally are gifts in a way that creates confidence in ourselves and shows our value to an employer.

Take Portland as an example. We all know about keeping the city weird, but what is consistent about the town that filters into all the community does? What are Portland's threads? Here are two: unrestrainable creative self-expression, and ongoing commitment to environmental protection. How do we know with confidence that this is truly what Portland is about? If we were writing a resume for Portland, we would give specific examples.

For unrestrainable creative self-expression, think about our food and drink: Microbreweries, coffee roasters, adventurous, award winning restaurants and farmer's markets. As for the arts, International Film Festival or Jazz Festival, Tango Fest and monthly art walks. Our annual events that include the Bridge Pedal, the PDX Adult Soap Box Derby, Tour de Coops and Time-Based Art Festival. Then our iconic local businesses: Powell's Books, food carts, Hollywood Theater, and Voodoo Doughnuts.

As for our ongoing commitment to environmental protection, we have compost at the curb. Sixty-three percent of all of our waste is recycled. Investment in public transportation, including our new MAXX Orange Line, strong urban growth boundary, buffer bike lanes, LEED certified buildings and more. With clear examples identified, how do you assign value to them? What do these threads mean about Portland?

To me, they create a great quality of life and keep our community vibrant, essential components for a city I choose to live in.

As you create your personal brand, ask yourself: What are my threads? How do they give value to others?

Mac Prichard:  

If you're looking for more expert advice and insider tips like those that Aubrie just shared, check out Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). This is the definitive guide for finding meaningful work, whether you're in Portland, Oregon, Portland, Maine, or anywhere in between. We're making the book even better. The 2016 edition will include new content and be available on a wide array of e-reading devices, including Kindle, Nook and iBooks, as well as a paperback edition. For more information, visit www.Macslist.org/ebook.



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Ep. 015: How To Get a Nonprofit Job (Allison Jones)


Wed, Dec 30, 2015


How do you get a nonprofit job? This is a big question that we hear from all kinds of job seekers: recent college graduates, corporate employees who want to switch careers, and government workers who want to continue to serve the public.

Like the question, the nonprofit sector is big. Almost 11 million Americans work for nonprofits in all kinds of jobs, from running soup kitchens and serving Girl Scouts, to managing organizations with billion dollar budgets.

Starting and maintaining a nonprofit career can be challenge. There’s a lot of competition for social good gigs, and professionals in the private sector may perceive cultural barriers to entry into the nonprofit space. Plus, there’s the question of how to making a living while working for a nonprofit.

 

This week on Find Your Dream Job Mac talks with a nonprofit expert: Allison Jones, Marketing and Publications Director at the Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network. Allison previously worked at Idealist.org and as a career-focused journalist. In this episode she discusses the different pathways to entering the nonprofit sector and her tips for building a rewarding social good career.

In this 34-minute episode you will learn:

  • Why you need to get specific when you think about a nonprofit career
  • Different ways that people enter the nonprofit space
  • What nonprofit hiring managers are looking for in new employees
  • The most enlightening questions you can ask in nonprofit-focused informational interviews
  • Why language matters when you apply for a nonprofit job
  • Salary and benefit expectations for the nonprofit sector

This week’s guest:

Allison Jones (@ajlovesya | LinkedIn)
Marketing & Publications Director
Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network (NTEN)
New York, N.Y.

Listener question of the week: 

  • How important is volunteer experience when applying for nonprofit jobs?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Cecilia Bianco, Mac’s List Community Manager at cecilia@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

--

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Mac Prichard:   

This is Find Your Dream Job, the podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want, and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard your host, and publisher of Mac's List. Our show is brought to you by Mac's List and our book, "Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond)." To learn more about the book and the updated edition that we're publishing in February, visit macslist.org/ebook. One of the most common questions we're asked at Mac's List is this, "How do I get a nonprofit job?" It's a big question, and we hear it from all kinds of people. Recent college graduates, corporate employees who want to switch careers, or government workers who want to continue to serve the public. Like the question the nonprofit sector is big, almost 11 million Americans work for nonprofits in all kinds of jobs, from running soup kitchens to serving Girl Scouts. We don't have all the answers for you today, but we can help you get started.

Joining me as our expert guest this week is Allison Jones. She's the Marketing and Publications Director at NTEN. That stands for Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network. We also have the Mac's List team Ben Forstag our Managing Director and Cecilia Bianco, our Community Manager, and they have resources and answers to questions about the nonprofit sector. Let's get started and begin by checking with the Mac's List team. Cecilia, Ben, how are you two this week?

Ben Forstag:      

I'm doing awesome.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Doing really good Mac.

Mac Prichard:   

Good. Well let's talk about nonprofits jobs. Now tell me, have either one of you worked in the nonprofit sector?

Ben Forstag:      

I spent 15 years in the nonprofit sector, in Pennsylvania, in Spain, in DC and most recently here in Portland.

Mac Prichard:   

Okay, and do you have one big lesson from that experience you want to share with our listeners about your time in the nonprofit world?

Ben Forstag:      

I think the big thing that I share with people is that a lot of times there's a stereotype that nonprofit careers, you can't do well in them. That you have to be the starving artist of sorts, but I think nonprofits are becoming increasingly professionalized, and you can have a career in which you do well for yourself and do good for the public as well. It's a really rewarding career.

Mac Prichard:   

How about you Cecilia?

Cecilia Bianco: 

I haven't worked for a nonprofit previously, but through my work at Mac's List I've met a lot of people who are in that sector, so I'm pretty familiar with that, and I would agree with Ben, that that's a big misconception that's starting to change.

Mac Prichard:   

I've worked for one nonprofit directly and like you Cecilia worked with a lot of different nonprofits as a vendor and partner, and I have seen a professionalization of the sector throughout my career and it's a good sign to see. Let's turn to Ben, who every week is out there exploring the internet looking for resources you can use, whether it's a blog, a podcast, or other tool. Ben what do you have for us this week?

Ben Forstag:      

So because we're talking about nonprofits this week, I wanted to spend a little time talking about the website Charity Navigator, and how it can be a resource for people who are looking for jobs in the nonprofit sector.

Charity Navigator as I'm sure you know is mostly known for its scoring system for charities, foundations and other registered nonprofits. Each year they review the public filings for thousands of local, regional, and national nonprofits, and they award stars based on each organization's financial viability, transparency, program spending, and other factors. These stars have become quite a big thing in the nonprofit community, as a star rating can have a major impact on potential donors. I know in my own experience, one organization I was in went from three stars to two stars. It raised a lot of questions from our donors about what's going on.

Mac Prichard:   

It's a tool that Charity Navigator often comes up in the media when it releases its information about the percentage of a budget a nonprofit spends on fundraising, and there are organizations out there that spend far too much on development and not enough on services, and that's one of the facts that Charity Navigator tracks.

Ben Forstag:      

I should say that Charity Navigator is not without its challenges. There's some serious questions out there in the media and in the nonprofit community about how exactly they give these ratings out, but for today's purposes this is the big site that people go to for evaluating nonprofits, so we're going to use that as the source. While Charity Navigator's primarily a tool for donors, it can also be very useful for job hunters. You might recall that several weeks ago we talked about the website Glassdoor.com, a website with salary, hiring, and internal culture information about different employers. At the time I mentioned that Glassdoor didn't have a lot of information about nonprofit organizations, particularly smaller nonprofits.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah that's definitely true.

Ben Forstag:      

Yeah and that's a function of a lot of nonprofits tend to be smaller to they have fewer employees and ex employees to fill out Glassdoor evaluations. Well Charity Navigator does have a lot of this information that Glassdoor's missing, giving potential job seekers a great sneak peek into how those organizations operate. They do this by pulling information from each organization's 990 Form, which is a public financial document that nonprofits are required to file each year by the IRS. On Charity Navigator you can find out fairly detailed information on the nonprofit's financial and management history, which is really important when you're looking for a stable workplace. You can also see roughly how much money you spent on programming versus administrative or fundraising expenses as Mac pointed out, and what programs received the most support within the organization.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Ben, can't you get a lot of that information just from the nonprofit's website?

Ben Forstag:      

Good question Cecilia. Sometimes you can. While it's generally a best practice to include this kind of information on an annual report on the company website, not all organizations do this. You know, everyone's trying to put their best foot forward when it comes to their website and their public presence. In general I think the information on Charity Navigator tends to be a bit more impartial and data-driven, omitting a lot of that marketing jargon and cheerleading that you might find on those organization's own website.

You can also get a sense of what the salaries are within a given nonprofit. If you go to the full 990 Form, which is available on Charity Navigator, you can see the organization's annual budget and the salary of top leadership. It's not going to tell you everyone's salary, so don't go looking for what the secretary's making, but from this information you can infer a general salary range for other positions in the organization. For example if the Executive Director is only making $45,000 a year, it's probably unlikely that a Program Director is going to be making the same amount.

This kind of benchmarking I found really valuable when I was looking for nonprofit jobs. I had a real firm minimum salary requirement, and many times the nonprofits I was interested didn't list their salaries on their job postings, and a quick check on Charity Navigator told me if it was worthwhile applying for a particular position in that organization.

If you're looking for nonprofit jobs I'd really encourage you to spend some times exploring the opportunities available on Charitynavigator.com, and I'll have the link in the show notes.

Mac Prichard:   

Great, well thank you Ben. If you have a suggestion for Ben, write him directly and we may share your idea on the show. Ben's address is Ben@macslist.org. Now it's time to turn to you, our listeners. Cecilia Bianco our Community Manager is here to answer one of your questions. Cecilia what do you hear from our community this week?

Cecilia Bianco: 

Our question this week is, "How important is volunteer experience when applying for nonprofit jobs?"

We get this question a lot because volunteering, a lot of people don't necessarily want to do it, but it can be really worthwhile. From the people I've talked to, I think volunteer experience can be a bit of a leg up when you're applying for a nonprofit job. When there's a large pool of applicants who are all saying that an organization's cause is their passion. Showing that you've donated your free time towards this cause is definitely going to help you stand out, but the importance of volunteering also depends on what type of work experience you already have. You might have already worked in that nonprofit's area, so volunteering isn't as important because you're already showing that you're passionate enough to pursue a career in it.

What do you two think, do you think volunteering is necessary?

Ben Forstag:      

I don't think it's necessary but I think it's a good idea. I think this is a form of networking that doesn't get employed enough. When you volunteer for an organization you shouldn't do it to get a job, but it certainly gets your name out there and you get to meet other staff members and other people in the community, and in doing so I think you improve your brand and your standing within that community and within that organization, so that if or when a job opening does become available you're a known commodity and someone that they know and trust with that position.

Mac Prichard:   

It's also a way of covering gaps in your resume. You can volunteer for a position at an organization that you want to have experience with to make those contacts, and obviously you do it in order to be of service, but while you look for work having even a part-time position, volunteer position within an organization, gives you a credential you can use to plug those gaps because sometimes, particularly for people mid-career, job searches can take three, six or even nine months.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah definitely. I think if you're unemployed and looking for a nonprofit job, volunteering is a win-win because you're adding to your resume and showing how much you want your work to support a certain cause, and as Ben said it's a great way to meet people who might be able to advocate for you when you go to apply at a certain organization. They might know someone who knows someone who works for your dream nonprofit and it can be really beneficial to volunteer because of this. I know I've heard plenty of stories of this happening in our nonprofit community, so it's definitely a win-win.

Mac Prichard:   

Good. Well thank you Cecilia. If you have a question for Cecilia please email her. Her address is Cecilia@macslist.org.

The segments by Ben and Cecilia are sponsored by the 2016 edition of "Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond)." We're making the complete Mac's List Guide even better by adding new content and making the book available on multiple e-reader platforms. When we launched the revised version in February 2016, you'll be able to access "Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond)" on your Kindle, Nook, iPad, and other digital devices. You'll also be able for the first time to order a paperback edition. Whatever the format our goal is the same. To give you the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work. For more information visit Macslist.org/ebook and sign up for our ebook newsletter. We'll send you publication updates, share exclusive book content, and provide you with special pre-sale prices.

Now let's turn to our guest expert Allison Jones. Allison is passionate about making the world a better place. As a proud nonprofit geek she has built her career in the sector, helping organizations leverage communications to fulfill their missions. Currently Allison is the Marketing and Publications Director at NTEN, and that stands for the Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network. Before that she worked at Idealist.org where she launched and managed Idealist Careers, a publication for purpose-driven professionals. Allison thank you for joining us.

Allison Jones:   

Thanks so much for having me. I'm excited about this conversation.

Mac Prichard:   

I know our listeners are too. We talked earlier about this in the show. We get this question a lot at Mac's List, how can I get a nonprofit job. With our listeners thinking about that, what do you encourage them to consider when they look at a career in nonprofits?

Allison Jones:   

Sure. My first gut reaction is to say well be more specific, right, because I think a lot of folks when they decide that they want a nonprofit job they usually coming from a place of ... Maybe they have a personal moment, that made them want to enter the social sector so maybe they noticed something in their community, they have something happen in their personal lives, maybe just like, "I want my work to be different," or perhaps they met someone who seemed to have a really awesome career in a nonprofit and it made them think differently about what their own career could be, which are all great starting points, but I think the nonprofit sector is so big that to say that you want a nonprofit job doesn't actually get you very far in terms of finding a job that you want. The first thing I would say is to be a bit more specific.

Mac Prichard:   

That's a great point. What steps have you seen people take to get specific? How do people narrow down on a particular goal?

Allison Jones:   

There are a couple things you can do there. If you're completely new to the sector and you're not quite sure where to start, I actually encourage folks to just look through job descriptions. Get a sense of what's out there by seeing what's out there, and that might sound a little tedious but there's an activity from NYU Wagner where they encourage you to do exactly that, to collect at least 50 job descriptions and then analyze them for patterns. You're drawn to this organization because of it's cause, so you notice that you really like organizations that focus on poverty or the environment or what have you. You're drawn to this job because of the work itself, so perhaps you notice that you really enjoy writing and a lot of the jobs that you point out are jobs that require writing, or even you're drawn to a job because of where it's located. You're passionate about certain areas. Looking for patterns in the things that you're drawn to. If you feel as if you're just completely coming at it with fresh eyes for a new career, I think that's one way to start.

Another way to start is to actually talk to people who seem like they have interesting careers in the nonprofit sector in the form of informational interviews. I give a lot of informational interviews and I've gone on a lot of informational interviews, and they've been really, really helpful for me and my career.

Mac Prichard:   

We're big fans of informational interviews here at Mac's List, and I want to return to your point too about job postings. There are a lot of job boards out there aimed at nonprofit careers. Do you have any favorites that you want to give shout-outs to?

Allison Jones:   

I used to work at Idealist.org.

Mac Prichard:   

One of our favorites.

Allison Jones:   

I was there for three and a half years and even before I started working there that's what I used to find opportunities so definitely Idealist being one of my top favorites.

Mac Prichard:   

Great, and it pains me to say this Allison but I know there are people out there who haven't heard of Mac's List or Idealist.org. Could you tell people about Idealist and why it's such a great place, because we're big fans of it.

Allison Jones:   

Sure. Idealist.org is a global nonprofit that connects people to resources and opportunities in the community they need to take action on causes they care about, so what this means is we're really not well known for our job board, and I haven't checked the stats lately because I don't work there anymore but when I left there were well over 12,000 nonprofit jobs. Actually not just nonprofit jobs but 12,000 jobs in nonprofit social enterprises and government agencies, listed around the world, and there are also thousands of volunteer opportunities, thousands of internships, and if you're curious just about organizations, if you just want to know what kind of organizations are out there doing work in causes that you care about, I think there were over 100,000 organizations using the sites so you could look up profiles of organizations just to get a sense of who's doing what, so it's a really great place to just go and start looking for ways to get involved.

Mac Prichard:   

Great, and to your earlier point it's a great place to find those job postings and begin to identify those posts, look for those patterns. Any other sites you want to give a shout-out to before we get back to informational interviews?

Allison Jones:   

Other then Idealist, this may sound really strange but I've heard good things about finding opportunities on Craigslist. It's another way, particularly for smaller cities I think that tends to be a go-to for a lot of people posting opportunities.

Mac Prichard:   

Good. One other suggestion that comes to my mind is I know every state has a nonprofit association. Sometimes they have different names. Many of them do operate job boards.

Allison Jones:   

Yes. Also add to that NTEN also has a job board. Particularly if you're interested in opportunities in tech. I think one other way is to look for organizations that have a very specific focus, either in a cause or a profession, so if you're interested in social work looking at social work associations, if you're interested in technology looking at NTEN, that kind of thing. Organizations that act as associations or gatherings for folks in specific places. They tend to also list opportunities as well.

Mac Prichard:   

Okay good, so people have taken the time, they've looked at job postings, they've identified positions, they've discovered those patterns that you've described, now they're ready to go do informational interviews. What are your top three informational interview tips for people who either want a career in the nonprofit sector or want to make a mid career switch into the nonprofit world?

Allison Jones:   

I think the first is to just prepare. Thinking of what you want to get out of the interview and craft some really great questions. For example, my favorite question is, "What do you wish someone had told you before you got into this field? Where were you before you got to this organization and this position?" Finding out about people's career paths I think is a great way to let you know the different ways that people arrived in their work, and that can give you insights in terms of the kind of skills that you need to brush up on. If you're having these informational interviews and everyone's telling you for example, "Yeah if you want this role grad school is really important," then you know that perhaps grad school is a step that you might want to take. For me I think these informational interviews are also very surprising in the sense that in quite a few fields people have various pathways they take, and I think that that's something that makes the nonprofit sector somewhat unique in the sense that there's no ... If you want to work in a nonprofit sector this is the specific path that you must take.

Of course that varies depending upon certain roles, but I think you'll in informational interviews and the kinds of roles that you're looking for you can really get a sense of the different pathways to finding a great career and getting insight as far as what people in your chosen profession have to do, what certain kinds of organizations are looking for, and their candidates. Preparing for informational interviews to get a sense of pathways and honestly what it takes to excel in a certain role is a really great way to make a use of them.

Mac Prichard:   

One question I hear from listeners when I encourage them to do informational interviews is they say to me, "How do I know that was a successful meeting? What should I expect to get out of that conversation?" What do you tell people when they ask you that question Allison?

Allison Jones:   

I think you get what you put into it, but I think for me, when I've gone on informational interviews, I tend to go in with a very specific need, and specific questions, and I feel successful at the end if I'm able to take another step towards what I came to the informational interviews for. For example, you never go into a informational interview asking for a job. That's just sort of ... You can ask about people's paths, what it takes to build a career in this field, what hiring managers might look for, but it's generally known that you don't ask for a job right then and there. What I found in my experiences of going on informational interviews is I felt comfortable ... I usually end up with clarity or a way to take action on something in my career. That has looked like, "Oh I thought I wanted to work at this kind of organization but I actually don't anymore," or, "I thought that I wanted to go to grad school but I don't anymore," or, "I've just learned there are plenty of opportunities in this particular field that I didn't consider before and I want to add that to my search list." It gives me clarity and I think that a successful informational interview gives you clarity and makes it easier for you to take another step toward where you want to be.

Mac Prichard:   

I think you're making an important point because often people tell me they want to stay open to all options and one of the benefits I see from informational interviews is it provides that clarity, that direction, and gives you insights into what doors you should continue to knock on and those that maybe that you want to keep closed.

Allison Jones:   

Exactly.

Mac Prichard:   

I bet you get this question a lot about profit jobs, I hear it to. What about salaries? What expectations should people have if they want a career in the nonprofit world, or they're thinking about moving into that sector?

Allison Jones:   

I think a couple things. One is to know ... How do I say this. I think at first it starts with you being clear about what your non-negotiables are, right. If there's a limit, if there's a minimum that you must have in order to take care of yourself it's okay to turn down jobs if they don't reach that minimum or they don't meet that minimum. The reason why I bring that up first is because I've found that people tend to be a bit more, you know if they're committed to a cause and want to make a difference they tend to overestimate their ability to deal with a certain salary, and they end up getting very frustrated, especially when you're working on something that doesn't necessarily have an end in sight. If you're working on eradicating poverty you may have milestones and goals over time, but obviously you're not going to see the end of poverty at anytime over the course of working at an organization. Being clear about what you need in terms of salary and in terms of other benefits is very important.

I also encourage folks to think, and I just mentioned this, to think in terms of total compensation. If the salary issue comes up and its not what you'd like it to be, it meets what you need but not what you want perhaps, in my experience I've found folks are very open to different kinds of benefits and to just having that conversation. All that being said I actually believe that you can have a great salary in the nonprofit sector, you just have to look and you have to ask, and that can be really tough. You can do research. There are some websites like Salary.com. You can look at an organization's 990s and 990s I think only tell you folks who are making over $100,000 at the organization if I'm not mistaken, but that can still give you a sense of, if you are going for an executive position or if you want to get a sense of the top salaries that does give you a good picture of what that looks like. There are ways to get a sense of what salary options are in terms of your research but definitely going in with a sense of what you need is very important.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah. What are some of those other benefits besides salary that you can get from the nonprofit world or that you should ask for? Again, I think people are reluctant to ask for things and when they're in a negotiation for a position that's when they have that opportunity and I think they're either reluctant to step up and ask or they don't know what to request. What sorts of things can people ask for in addition to money?

Allison Jones:   

Vacation days. And sick days, I've definitely seen that. Any other ... Help with transportation, so if folks depending on where you live, covering gas or your public transportation cost is another thing. Professional development support and resources. What funding is on the table for you to go to conferences and get the PD that you need to excel in your work. There are a bunch of different things and you can definitely do some research on that, but just again the point is to be very clear about what's most important to you.

Mac Prichard:   

Okay. People come to nonprofit work often because they have a calling or they want to make a difference. They feel a sense of purpose, but the job search basics still matter don't they?

Allison Jones:   

Absolutely, absolutely.

Mac Prichard:   

What are the ABCs that you can't ignore, whether you're looking for nonprofit work or any kind of job?

Allison Jones:   

I think first of all following directions is really important and it's funny, when I worked at Idealist, I was able to talk to quite a few hiring managers and I hired some folks from my team as well, and it's surprising how many folks don't follow directions, whether it be, "Answer these three questions in your cover letter," and people just aren't doing it. Stuff like that. Not following directions is not just a matter of the hiring manager's trying to test you, but also it's more of a matter of this actually helps us read applications and select candidates easier and faster if you follow directions. Making sure you do what's being asked of you. Tailoring the cover letter and the resume to the job itself and that in and of itself can be a bit of a conversation but what that really means is you're looking at the job description, what are they looking for the candidate to do, what kind of candidate are they looking for, not just in terms of qualifications but also in terms of attributes and characteristics. Are they saying they need someone who can thrive in a fast-paced environment, or are they saying that they need someone who's collaborative? Being able to indicate not only your successes as they pertain to the needs of the job but also your ability to fit in in terms of the attributes and characteristics that a person will need to do in that work.

Focusing on your accomplishments. This is something that I've seen in a lot of resumes where it's just like, "I worked at X place and I did X things," versus, "I worked at X place and did X things which resulted in increasing revenue, decreasing turn-over," whatever have you, but making sure it attaches to some key accomplishments. Being clear about why you want to work there should be in your cover letter. For organizations that are mission-driven, who their entire purpose is to have an impact I think being clear about why you want to work in that cause, why with that organization, and not just because it seems like a cool place to be but really something specific is important. Finally just proofreading. Error free, easy to read, decent margins, those are also really important things.

Mac Prichard:   

We're coming to the end of our interview, but there is one question I want to raise that we get a lot. It's from people who have been in the private sector for five, ten, fifteen years and they want to make the transition into the nonprofit world. They tell us they struggle, they're not sure how to describe what they've done and make it appealing to nonprofit managers and hiring managers. How have you seen people address that Allison?

Allison Jones:   

In a few ways, and first I actually want to ... There's someone in particular who I just thought of, Heather Krasna. She's a dean at Columbia University School of Public Health. She is brilliant at this sort of thing, really working with sector-switchers so I definitely recommend her as a resource.

Mac Prichard:   

Let's get a URL from you and we'll put her in the show notes.

Allison Jones:   

As far as just making the sector switch, first I think networking is really important. I think having people who can give you an inside look as to what's required to work in a nonprofit because I think in some ways there is some suspicion of private sector folks. Are you coming here because you want a break? Are you coming here because you think it will be easier? There's some suspicion I think from nonprofit folks. Not all the time and not in every case, but just the wondering of ... You need to be able to answer that question of why. Why are you making this switch and being very honest about that. I think making language tweaks in your resume, cover letter, so instead of saying things like, "client or customer," you might want to say, "community or constituent," or something like that where it makes the most sense to do so.

The transferable skills are important as well, so things like if the job you're going for requires you to be a great public speaker, that's something that you can call out in your resume and cover letter as things you've done in different contexts so it's a skill that you don't necessarily need to have developed in the nonprofit sector. You could have developed it anywhere. But you want to make sure you pull that out or call that out rather in your materials as something you have done in different contexts and they've still resulted in great things. Finally getting nonprofit experience where you can. Obviously finding a full time job is awesome and ideal, but if you've been on a board, if you've volunteered, if you've offered your consulting services pro bono, those are all experiences that are valuable because they indicate that you've done some work before trying to apply for a job, that you have some experience with a nonprofit sector and that you're not just coming at it blind.

Mac Prichard:   

Great. Well I think that's the perfect place to stop. Thank you Allison so much for joining us.

Allison Jones:   

Oh no problem. Thanks for having me.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah. You can find Allison on Twitter. Her Twitter handle is @ajlovesya, and she also has a LinkedIn profile. We'll include links to both her Twitter account and her LinkedIn page in the show notes. Thank you Allison Jones.

Allison Jones:   

Thank you.

Mac Prichard:   

Okay we're back with the Mac's List team. Cecilia, Ben, what are some of the key takeaways from our conversation with Allison?

Cecilia Bianco: 

What I took away was that no matter where you're at informational interviews in the nonprofit world are the best way to get connected, and I think she made a lot of good points about how to go about that and why it's so important, because we know from talking to the Mac's List community a lot of people are getting jobs through meeting people in the community and the easiest way to do that is through informational interviews.

Mac Prichard:   

Good. Ben how about you?

Ben Forstag:      

I liked her point about how important it is to follow instructions in a job posting. It reminded me of a job I used to work at where as part of the hiring process they would put in slightly anachronistic rules into that job posting and one of the ways they weeded out if the applicant was detail oriented, was, did they follow the rule. Things like, "Put this as the subject line in the email when you email in your resume and application." They wouldn't even open up an email unless it had the right subject line in it. I think it's important to really read through the application, make sure you're following all the instructions they give, because there is a reason behind those instructions and oftentimes it's just to winnow out the numbers of applicants.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah, I thought she had good practical suggestions both on informational interviews and the application process that would apply not only to the nonprofit world but the private sector as well.

Ben Forstag:      

Yeah, definitely.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah, so good stuff. Well thank you both, and thank you our listeners. We'll be back next week with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job. In the meantime you can visit us at Macslist.org where you can sign up for our free newsletter with more then 100 new jobs every week, and if you like what you hear on the show please help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. This helps others discover the show and helps us help more job seekers. Thank you for listening.



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Ep. 014: The Millennials’ Guide to Finding a Job (Paul Angone)


Wed, Dec 23, 2015


Millennials, the 54 million Americans born after 1980, now account for more than a third of the workforce in the United States. Perhaps more than any generation, millennials stand out for wanting meaningful, purpose-driven careers. And they have brought new ideas about decision-making, management style, and work-life balance into the workforce.

Millennials face challenges, too. Many started work in the middle of the Great Recession, which may result in up-to $100,000 of “lost” wages during their lifetime. Those lucky enough to find jobs were often overqualified. And there’s a stereotype that millennials are high maintenance and overly demanding.

This week on Find Your Dream Job Mac talks with Paul Angone, an author, career coach, and advocate for millennial workers. Paul has dedicated himself to helping millennials overcome their fear of insignificance and find purposeful work. He believes that the secret to a great job is building your “signature sauce”--aligning your strengths, skills, and values around a need or problem that can be solved.

In this 34-minute episode you will learn:

  • The myriad motivators for millennials workers (it’s not just about a paycheck!)
  • Why failure can help clarify your passions
  • How to build genuine relationships when you network
  • The recipe behind your own “signature sauce”
  • Why you should watch out for OCD--“Obsessive Comparison Disorder”
  • The best thing millennials can do to get a job they love

This week’s guest:

Paul Angone (@PaulAngone | LinkedIn)
Founder, All Groan Up
Author, All Groan Up: Searching For Self, Faith, and a Freaking Job! and
101 Secrets For Your Twenties
San Diego, Calif.

Listener question of the week: 

  • How can I stand out as a recent college graduate?

Do you have a question you’d like us to answer on a future episode? Please send your questions to Cecilia Bianco, Mac’s List Community Manager at cecilia@macslist.org.

Resources referenced on this week’s show:

If you have a job-hunting or career development resource resource you’d like to share, please contact Ben Forstag, Mac’s List Managing Director at ben@macslist.org.

--

Thank you for listening to Find Your Dream Job. If you like this show, please help us by rating and reviewing our podcast on iTunes. We appreciate your support!

Opening and closing music for Find Your Dream Job provided by Freddy Trujillo, www.freddytrujillo.com.

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FULL TRANSCRIPT

Mac Prichard:   

This is Find Your Dream Job, a podcast that helps you get hired, have the career you want and make a difference in life. I'm Mac Prichard, your host and publisher of Mac's List. Our show is brought to you by Mac's List and our book, Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). To learn more about the book and the updated edition we're publishing in February, come to our website. Just visit macslist.org/ebook.

Millennials, the 54 million Americans born after 1980, who came of age in the New Millennium, now account for more than a third of the workforce in the United States. Perhaps more than any generation, Millennials stand out for wanting meaningful careers, and lives that balance career and family. They are also the first generation digital natives. Millennials face challenges, too. Many started work in the middle of the Great Recession, and entering a labor market during a recession can mean up to a hundred thousand dollars in lost wages during a lifetime. Those lucky enough to find jobs were often overqualified, and there's a stereotype out there of Millennials as high maintenance workers who are overly concerned with titles and status.

This week on Find Your Dream Job, we're talking about Millennials and the search of meaningful work. Joining us for our interview segment is Paul Angone. He's an expert on Millennials and the author of 101 Secrets for Your Twenties. Ben Forstag has a book for us that any generation can use to map out a career for meaningful work, and Cecilia Bianco has a question from a new college graduate just beginning a career.

But first, let's check in with the Mac's List team. I think we have all three generations represented here.

Ben Forstag:   

I think you might be right.

Mac Prichard: 

For the benefit of our listeners, do people want to self-identify?

Cecilia Bianco: 

I'm a Millennial.

Mac Prichard:  

Okay, good. Ben?

Ben Forstag:  

I was born in '79, so I'm right at the cusp between Generation X and Millennial.

Mac Prichard:  

I'm a solid Boomer. I was born in 1958, so we have good representation here.

Let's move on with our topic this week. Ben, you're out there every week looking around the internet and what have you found for us this week?

Ben Forstag:      

Mac, can you hear this sound?

Mac Prichard:  

That's very analog of you.

Ben Forstag:

It is, yes. I'm sure they have this book in digital format as well, but this week I'm talking about the physical book, and it's called Answering the Three Career Questions: Your Lifetime Career Management System, and this was a book that was recommended to me by Russell Terry, one of our long time listeners. The book is by author Bruce Hazen, and it's a really interesting read. The author has a very clear goal with this book, and it's to help people avoid the one-job-in-a-row trap. Too often, people see their career as simply the narrative of all their jobs, one after another, and you sometimes see that in their resume. Hazen says that people should really see their career as something different than the sum of their jobs. It's really a holistic narrative about what you find important, what you find interesting, engaging and satisfying as a professional. In a sense, he's flipping this on its head. The career should dictate what jobs you have and not vice versa.

This is a concept I know we've talked a lot about in the podcast. In episode 2, Dawn Rasmussen called your career "the stream that runs beneath your current job", and even some of the practical tips we've provided around branding, resume building and interviewing, you can see this recurring theme of your career being a driving narrative behind your professional life.

In his book, Bruce Hazen frames career management around three questions that professionals should regularly ask themselves. Those questions are: One, is it time to move up? In other words, do you need a development strategy to progress in your current organization? He makes a really interesting distinction between promotion and progression here. Promotion is about moving up in an established organizational hierarchy; getting a promotion essentially, while progressing is about improving your own subjective satisfaction with your job. He has this great quote: Up has dimension and not just direction, so moving up could mean adding complexity or authority to your work, enriching the job you've got, a lateral move to a job you like more, changing location, or even in some cases, moving down the hierarchy to a job that you prefer.

Mac Prichard:   

I think as people think about their goals, it's important to remember titles alone aren't going to bring you satisfaction. Sometimes I think people think the only change that's a good one is one that has you moving up the hierarchy of your organization, but sometimes you might have other goals. I think for example, when I was working in the governor's office, I had an opportunity to take a position in politics with a group of state legislators and I turned that down to work for the State Purchasing Bureau. People said, "Why would you do that? Isn't that a step down?", and it was actually what I needed at that time, which was steady work, well-paying work, and it was a great opportunity for the year that I did that. Eventually it led me to another position in communications, which has been my career, but people I think here, Ben, shouldn't get hung up on just always moving up and up and up.

Ben Forstag: 

Yeah, and I know in my own career, there have been a couple of times when I've taken a step down the hierarchy, or at least as it looked on paper or as it played out in my paycheck. At the time, a lot of people scratched their heads and I even questioned that, but in the long run, that ended up being the best possible move I could make because I ended up liking the new job more, and it helped me transition into new fields that I might not have been able to do so otherwise.

The second question here is, is it time to move out? Is it time to move to a job that better aligns with your interests, passions and needs? Do you need a strategy to transition into this new organization or field? The question here is really fit. Does your current job or organization fit with who you are as a person? Hazen provides different tools to ascertain fit, with a lot of tests around measuring work values and ethics and things like that. He also outlines strategies for professionals who realize their current position isn't a good fit for who they are.

Cecilia Bianco: 

I think this one's great and it would be so good if people would sit down and do these tests before they start looking for a job and interviewing, because if they know what they want as far as fit, they're going to have a much easier job search.

Ben Forstag: 

Yeah, I think fit is so important, and I know I've been in jobs where I just haven't been a good fit for the organization and it wasn't my fault or the organization's fault, it just wasn't an alignment. If you can get clear about what a good fit is before you start the job, that's clearly a benefit.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah.

Ben Forstag:    

The third question here is, is it time to adapt your style for greater success? That is are you in the right position, but not getting the right traction or the right results in that position? This question is really aimed at people who have the right technical skills to succeed, but need a new approach to their colleagues or to their organization. Hazen shares a couple of different strategies for using your skills in interacting with others, all with the intent of improving your productivity and satisfaction with your current job.

When I talked to our listener Russell about this, I asked him why exactly he liked this book so much, and this is what he said: "I found it helpful to break things down to three basic questions and to emphasize that through our careers, we keep coming back to these same three questions."

I really, really liked what Russell said here, and I totally agree with him. I think the strong point about this book is that it does bring all these questions back into the center of the conversation over and over again, so I strongly suggest to anyone who is looking at career management tools, check out this book. Again, the book is called Answering the Three Career Questions: Your Lifetime Career Management System, and it's by author Bruce Hazen, and we will have a link to the book in our show notes.

Mac Prichard: 

Thank you, Ben, and thank you, Russell, for that suggestion. Do you have a book or a podcast or website that has been helpful to you in your job search or managing your career? Let Ben know about it. You can write him directly, and his email address is Ben@macslist.org.

Now let's turn to you, our listeners. Cecilia Bianco, our community manager is here, and she answers one of your questions. Cecilia, what do you have for us this week?

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, our question this week is how can I stand out as a recent college graduate? I personally think the best way to stand out as a recent grad is to have an established and strong personal brand, so your goal should be, if an employer looks online for you, are they going to view you as a professional or a college student? Obviously, the goal is to look like a professional, even if you haven't graduated yet. Are they going to be able to tell what your career interests are based on what they find about you online?

Something I was required to do in my college program before I graduated was to create a personal website that showcased my experience and my goals for the future, and this was a great way for me and my classmates to really stand out. It made us look a bit more polished and prepared to start job searching because it forced us to figure out the type of job and industry that we could realistically apply for and have a good chance of getting. Beyond just building your personal website, your social media profiles, your resume and cover letter and your business cards should all fit with this personal brand that you're building for yourself.

One girl in my program I was very impressed with. She created a logo for herself and used it to build a template for her website application material and it really made her stand out. She had no trouble getting interviews because her branded materials made her look like a seasoned professional rather than a college student or a recent grad. Mac and Ben, what are your thoughts on how college grads can stand out?

Ben Forstag:  

I think the number one way that anyone can stand out, whether you're a college grad or an established professional, is good writing. It is so rare to find someone who can write concisely and clearly nowadays, and anyone who does that is a real valued commodity I think in almost any organization, so whether that writing shows in your portfolio or the writing sample you submit as part of your application or even the language you use on your website, the more you can showcase good writing ability, the more you'll stand out with employers.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, that's definitely true, and building a personal website is one way to get your writing and your message about yourself really clear.

Ben Forstag:  

Yeah, and definitely good writing is part of the brand that you present about yourself.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah.

Mac Prichard:  

Yeah, I think good writing is always effective, no matter what your age or what stage you are in your career. For recent college graduates, it's a tactical tip, but one thing that can make them stand out I think, Cecilia, is just having a business card. It's old-fashioned, but it fits in with your earlier point about having a strong personal brand. When I meet recent college graduates, often they don't have cards, but they either ask for mine or would I offer them a card. There's an opportunity there to be on equal footing by sharing a card of their own. It's easy to do and is a way of distinguishing yourself.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Yeah, definitely. The people in my program, since we all had cards, when we would get sent out to networking events, we would talk about how some of the employers, they would be shocked when we handed over a business card, and we hadn't graduated yet, so that's definitely really important.

Ben Forstag:   

Two points about business cards: One is they do make you feel like a professional when you have them and you start handing them out. You feel like hey, I've made it. The other one is you can get business cards really cheaply online, like ten dollars will buy you five hundred business cards, so it's definitely a good investment and a really cheap investment as well.

Mac Prichard: 

Yeah, and you can get them for free. There's services that do that, but they're branded by the company that produces them, and I think spend the five or ten dollars it takes to get one with your own personal brand.

Ben Forstag: 

Definitely.

Mac Prichard: 

Okay, well, thanks, Cecilia. That was a great question. If you have a question for Cecilia, you can email her. Her address is Cecilia@macslist.org. I noticed today on Twitter, Cecilia, one of our listeners was tweeting at both of us, and she said that she'd sent you several questions.

Cecilia Bianco: 

Oh, yeah, I already got her questions.

Mac Prichard:   

Terrific. These segments by Ben and Cecilia are sponsored by the 2016 edition of Land Your Dream Job in Portland (and Beyond). We're making the complete Mac's List guide even better. We're adding new content and we're making the book available on multiple e-reader platforms. In February, we'll launch a new version of the book, and you'll for the first time be able to access it on Kindle, Nook, iPad and other digital devices, and for the first time, you'll be able to get a paperback edition. Thank you, Ben, so whatever the format, our goal's the same. We want you to have the tools and tips you need to get meaningful work. For more information, go to our website. Visit macslist.org/ebook. You can sign up for our e-book newsletter, and when you do that, you'll get publication updates, exclusive book content, and we'll provide you with special pre-sale prices.

Now let's turn to this week's guest, Paul Angone. Paul is a leading voice to and for millennials. He loves helping millennials uncover their unique signature sauce to find where their passion, purpose and career collide.

Paul is a best selling author of 101 Secrets For Your Twenties and All Groan Up. He's also a national speaker and the creator of AllGroanUp.com, which has been read by millions of people in more than 190 countries. Paul, thanks for joining us today.

Paul Angone:     

Oh, thank you for having me. It's an honor being here.

Mac Prichard:  

Yeah, it's a pleasure to have you on the show. Now Paul, millennials stand out for a number of reasons, but what is most striking I think about this generation is their desire for work that has purpose. Why do you think it's such an important value for millennials?

Paul Angone:    

Yeah, that's a great question. You're right. When I look at all the research I've done over the years, all the blog articles I've written, all the emails I've received from millennials, really all over the world. I don't think this is just solely in the United States where we're at, but I think this is worldwide. If I distill it down I think one of millennials' greatest fears is insignificance. Is this feeling of I'm doing work that has no point and my life is kind of meaningless. I'm just showing up everyday going through the motions.

I think millennials are truly at their core for the most part really driven by trying to find this meaningful work. Trying to find purpose and trying to do something that feels like man, this really means something important to me and I'm not just getting a paycheck or working for the corner office. Millennials really aren't wired that way. They have different motivators than just a pay hike. They really want to find work that is drenched in purpose.

Mac Prichard: 

How do you see millennials get clear about that purpose? What do people who are successful at chasing their purpose do?

Paul Angone:  

That's the million dollar question, isn't it? That's the tough one. It can become very difficult. I know for myself it was a very frustrating process in a sense because I loved hearing about I want to follow my passion, I want to do work I'm passionate about, but I was really struggling with how do you figure that out. How do you find what you're passionate about? I didn't have a clue.

I was going through college doing all the right things, getting the good grades, trying to pick the right major, pick the right internship, taking these steps. I felt like if I just kept taking the right steps up there somewhere was going to be success. Up there somewhere was going to be my passion. Yet when I got up there I still felt as lost as ever. Maybe even more lost because I didn't know what my passion was.

For me, and I think for a lot of millennials going through the same kind of process, is that it is a process. It takes time and it takes one thing in particular that I don't think a lot of us think about or want to think about, but I think one of the really big clarifiers to finding your passion is failure. I didn't really want to hear that or understand that when I was searching for my passion, but I think failure becomes that great clarifier.

Because when you've failed at something but yet you want to keep doing it, well then you've found something, there's something there that you're really truly passionate about.

Mac Prichard: 

Let's explore that because I think that's one thing that many of us are taught to avoid at all costs is failure.

Paul Angone:     

Exactly. Yeah.

Mac Prichard:  

Why do you think it makes such a big difference for people who are trying to find their purpose?

Paul Angone:

I think it's easy to say that you're passionate about something or you're excited about something that you are achieving a lot of success in. Or maybe you're getting accolades for or getting good grades or you're getting money to do it, but when those externals start going away or in my case I really wanted to write a book.

I was passionate about wanting to help specifically twenty-somethings that were struggling in kind of the what now of life after college. Yet for years I couldn't get a publisher to say yes to anything I was writing. I couldn't get people to return emails. I thought my email was broken at one point because I couldn't get anybody to return an email of mine.

I quickly realized that I was truly passionate about this topic, about helping twenty-somethings, about trying to write and speak to them because even through all the no's and rejections I still kept showing up and I kept writing and I kept pursuing it and hammering away at it. I really figured out that that was something I was truly passionate about.

Where other ideas that I had, other pursuits, business ideas, things that I did when I hit those first couple of obstacles like all of us will, I quickly quit. I quit that dream. I went another way because really I wasn't in it for the right reasons. I wasn't truly passionate about that endeavor. Like I was when I was writing and trying to really reach twenty-somethings.

Mac Prichard: 

Okay, so there's a big difference between enthusiasms and passion. Tell us how can you figure out what is your passion. Does it require failure or is there a shortcut?

Paul Angone:  

Well, I think we'd all be lying to ourselves if we thought failure wasn't a part of it. You know?

Mac Prichard: 

Okay.

Paul Angone: 

Just like any good entrepreneur, and I've actually tried to infuse more of this in my lifestyle, I never thought of myself as an entrepreneur before, but I've kind of become and entrepreneur through circumstances. I'm trying to develop more of what I call an entrepreneurial mindset. I think what entrepreneurs are really good at and what they understand is that failure is just that learning process and when they release products even in the business realm they beta test products. They release version 1.0.

Basically they release something that they know is not complete, that they know is not perfect, that they know in some respect will fail and that's kind of the point because they know that they'll learn so much through the process and the feedback and the test groups and those kinds of things that when they create version 2.0 it's going to be better.

I think for all of us, whether we're an entrepreneur or not, when you're pursuing something and you feel like yeah, this is something. I feel alive when I'm pursuing this. I feel passionate, these words that we say. It's not having that fear that you're going to fail. Because the possibility for greatness and embarrassment both exist in the same space. You really can't have one without the other.

Mac Prichard:   

Okay. For millennials who want to pursue their passion, and I meet many every day who do, they should expect fear and that failure will be part of that process. It's a good feedback mechanism. It shows you that you're on the right path particularly if you persist and you keep getting up even when you're knocked down.

Now, once people have figured out they need to follow that passion and be persistent about it, what are some of the other career challenges you see for millennials?

Paul Angone:

Yeah and I think following your passion and pursuing that, it's such a big overwhelming word.

Mac Prichard:   

It is, yeah.

Paul Angone:     

I even have to break it down. That's why I love talking about this metaphor of finding your signature sauce because it gives me a great mental image of what I think the metaphor looks like. When I talk about finding your signature sauce I mean the blend of ingredients that are coming together within each person to create that kind of flavor, to create that passion, to create that signature sauce that they want to serve to the world so to speak.

I think even in this idea of finding your passion, I think we can unpack that even more for millennials or for really anybody and break down I think some key ingredients that go into that. For one of those as millennials are pursuing their career and trying to find jobs that align with that, one I think it's really a simple way is finding something that your strengths and your skills align with.

I think for a lot of us we become passionate about something and we want to keep pursuing it when we feel like we're good at it, when we have some skill sets that resonate with that, that we have some strengths that we really lend to this arena that makes us feel good when we're doing it because we're achieving some sort of success in that endeavor.

It doesn't have to be all about failure, you know? There is the skills and strengths that are a part of that. Then another crucial ingredient I think that aligns with that is your values.

Mac Prichard:

Lets talk about values and the difference they can make, Paul.

Paul Angone:

Yeah. Yeah, to make it personal for me and when I started realizing this is I felt like a strength of mine, and this can be up for debate and your listeners can debate this if they want, but I felt a strength of mine was communication. I felt like I loved speaking, I loved writing, I loved communicating ideas.

I always thought I should try to do a sales job because then I'd be in front of people, I'd be speaking, I'd be using that strength of communication. Yet I took a couple sales jobs and I was absolutely terrible as a salesman. I was just terrible and I hated it. I didn't enjoy it. I started realizing that I had a value of being authentic. Authenticity was a really crucial value of mine.

Actually in a couple sales jobs when I felt like I was selling something that I didn't really believe in and I felt like I was being inauthentic it actually kind of undercut my strength. My strength was no longer that strong because my value was more important to me. Really it was that value of authenticity aligning with my strength of communication and then that was where my sweet spot was. When I really get passionate about something like helping people, helping twenty-somethings, giving them hope and truth and hilarity, I get excited about that because I really believe in it. It really ties in with my value.

Mac Prichard:  

Okay, so I want to move onto some other topics, but before we leave this idea of the secret sauce and the ingredients, you talked about the importance of skills and strengths and recognizing values. Are there one or two other key ingredients you want to share with people?

Paul Angone:    

Yeah, I think another really big one that was really the driving force behind me pursuing and pushing through obstacles is I think people when they find a passion and when they talk about something they're passionate about, a lot of the times it directly relates to a need or a problem that they really want to fix. We see needs and problems very differently depending on our background, our story, where we're at, the way were raised. All the different intricacies that make us us.

Even you and I mac, we might see problems and needs in a very different way. I think for all of us, when you're pursuing something that is bigger than yourself, and it doesn't have to be huge. You don't have to be changing the world here. Maybe it is, but maybe it's even a problem that you see in your current job. Maybe you see something that can be optimized and could run smoother.

Or maybe it is that you see homeless people in your community and you see that as a huge need that you want to do something about. I think sometimes when we take our strengths and our skills and we take our values and then we align those with really serving or trying to solve a need or a problem, man, I think that will push you through more obstacles than anything. That's really what my story was about was pursuing a need and a problem where I felt like there was a lot of people that needed this information and needed kind of this hope and insight.

Even if I was getting rejected I felt like this is such a big issue, I'm going to keep doing it because if I'm not going to do it, who else is? I have to keep hammering away at this. I think something will work out.

Mac Prichard:  

I think that's excellent advice both from a strategic point of view, but for job seekers in general because when employers are looking for help they've got a problem. They have a need that has to be addressed. Understanding that need and knowing how your strengths and your skills can help solve that problem I find puts candidates who can do that at the front of the crowd. So excellent advice Paul.

Paul Angone:

Exactly.

Mac Prichard: 

Let's talk specifically about millennials and maybe some tactile things. Is there one thing that you recommend every millennials do to get a better job? Or just a job.

Paul Angone:    

Yeah. Yeah, there's so much nowadays and I guess I'll hone in on one thing. Typically when we're talking about the job search and all this it can be very overwhelming, but we all know that a lot of job opportunities, we've seen the stats, they'll come through networking or through relationships. I know for myself, networking was always challenging for me because again, it's kind of that value of authenticity, but I think a lot of millennials feel this way where it can kind of feel inauthentic.

Or you're going to a networking event and maybe you feel like that used car salesman that's pushing your business card to everybody and trying to get an opportunity or trying to make a pitch, your elevator speech so that you can get that job. Really for me, when I started thinking about it more as what I call relation-shipping, so not networking per se, but relation-shipping. Why I call it that is because I feel like when you're focused on building just relationships and giving to people and adding value and when you're meeting people you're not just pitching them on your elevator speech about how amazing you are, but you're just asking them questions about how amazing they are for the first five minutes. You don't say anything about yourself.

That becomes such a more effective way to build relationships, but also in a turn, a byproduct of that is people like you more. They want to help you. Now when they have a job opportunity maybe they think about your first because people love being able to talk about themselves. If you can ask them good questions and focus more on relation-shipping, building value added relationships, man, I think that's really going to set you apart instead of talking about yourself and being a me monster at a networking event.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah. I think that goes back to your earlier point, Paul about thinking about the needs of others and their problems and how you can help solve them.

Paul Angone:     

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Mac Prichard:   

Not thinking just about your own needs.

Paul Angone:   

Exactly.

Mac Prichard: 

Yeah. Well, your first book was 101 Secrets For Your Twenties. Can you do a lightning round of those secrets for us?

Paul Angone:

Oh sure. Yeah, there's 101 of them so it's always hard to pick my favorites. I think one of them that has resonated with a lot of people is to watch out for what I call the new OCD. Which it's not the OCD as we typically think of, but it's obsessive comparison disorder. I think for a lot of millennials especially this is so prevalent nowadays, especially through social media.

I think for any of us that is going through transition, that is maybe trying to change jobs or you feel like well, I'm not doing my passion right now. I'm working in a coffee shop or I'm selling insurance. I'm not really that excited about my life. It can become very hard when you're looking at social media and you're looking at the perceived amazing-ness of everybody else's lives and what we're showcasing on social media.

Which isn't always the most accurate truth that I think most of us know, but it doesn't feel that way sometimes. Watch out for what I call obsessive comparison disorder. Because if you're always measuring yourself up to the images that people are putting up on Instagram or are on Facebook, you're always going to feel lacking or you're always going to feel like I'm not enough. I think that's a really big one.

Mac Prichard:  

Okay. Excellent advice. We're coming to the end of our interview, Paul. Tell me, what's next for you? What do you have coming up?

Paul Angone:  

Yeah, for me I'm really excited actually about an online course that I've started called Finding Your Signature Sauce. I just took my first group of students through it just now and it's been amazing to be able to walk through this process with people and go on a deeper level than just through blogs or books, but actually have a personal relationship and get to know a lot of people.

That's probably the thing that I'm most excited about right now is just refining that and really helping people through that process of finding your signature sauce and all that entails.

Mac Prichard: 

Great. Well thank you, Paul. Tell our listeners how they can find you online. Where can they learn more about you, your books and your work?

Paul Angone:    

Yeah, they can find me at my main website is AllGroanUp.com and groan is spelled like you're groaning in pain, All Groan Up. I like to say that it's pun-derful, is my go to joke. Yeah, All Groan Up. They can find me on Twitter at Paul Angone, A-N-G-O-N-E or they can find me at SignatureSauce.com. Any of those websites or through Twitter. Reach out if you have questions. Id love to connect with you.

Mac Prichard:   

Great and we'll be sure to include those links in the show notes. Thanks for joining us this week, Paul.

Paul Angone: 

Thank you, Mac.

Mac Prichard:  

Well, we're back with Cecilia and Ben. Tell me, what do you think we're the most important points you heard Paul make?

Cecilia Bianco: 

I really liked his point about how to tell what your real passions are. He mentioned that if you fail at something and you keep doing it because you enjoy it so much, that's how you can tell that you're passionate about it. Following that I think is really key when you're a millennial trying to find the career you want.

Mac Prichard:   

Yeah. I identified with that too. In my 20s and 30s I worked on a lot of election campaigns. I worked on a lot of losing campaigns and I kept showing up every election cycle. We won some, but I was so passionate about that work and the opportunity it offered to make a difference I kept signing up for campaigns even when we lost.

Ben Forstag:      

I liked his point about finding a problem that needs to be fixed. I know for me personally that resonates because I find the most enjoyment in my work when there is this problem. It doesn't need to be a giant problem. It could be how to increase the open rates on an email for example, but having that problem to explore and to test things out, that really animates a lot of where I find enjoyment in work.

Mac Prichard:  

Good. I think that was good advice not only for millennials, but for any generation. Well, thank you all for listening. We'll be back next week with more tools and tips you can use to find your dream job. In the meantime visit us at MacsList.org where you can sign up for our free newsletter with more than 100 new jobs every week. If you like what you hear on our show you can help us by leaving a review and a rating at iTunes. This helps other job seekers discover the show. It helps us help more people. Thank you for listening.