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This Author: Doug Fabrizio
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PRI: Radio West Podcast by Doug Fabrizio

PRI: Radio West Podcast

by Doug Fabrizio

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Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. Listeners can join live at (801) 585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org. The conversation continues on our on-line discussion board at www.kuer.org. RadioWest is broadcast live on KUER 90.1 and on XM Public Radio at 11:00 a.m. Mountain/1:00 p.m. Eastern.


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Much Ado About Shakespeare's Women

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Aug 26, 2016


Utah Shakespeare Festival is performing Much Ado About Nothing, and we’re using it as an excuse to talk about Shakespeare’s women. Scholar Kate McPherson says few Elizabethan playwrights created female characters as rich as the Bard, and that Much Ado is his most sophisticated play about women. It features Beatrice, a feisty and fearless lady who has forsworn love. McPherson, actor Kim Martin-Cotten, and director David Ivers join us to talk about Beatrice and the challenges and opportunities afforded women in Shakespeare’s world.

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Henry V

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Aug 25, 2016


Thursday, we’re live at the Utah Shakespeare Festival with a look at the bard’s great history Henry V. Director Brian Vaughn says the play represents a battle of conscience. Through two earlier works, Shakespeare’s audience knows Prince Hal as a wild and irresponsible young man. But now he has the crown, and must weigh right and wrong to grow into the role of king. We’ll talk about the character, how he’s been portrayed over time, and what the play has to say about leadership and authority.

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The Hour of Land

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Aug 24, 2016


Wednesday, writer and naturalist Terry Tempest Williams joins Doug to discuss her latest book, The Hour of Land. It’s a paean to America’s natural parks. The parks are, Williams says, fundamental to our national identity, despite our complicated relationship with them. To mark the centennial of the National Parks Service, Williams visited 12 national parks. She wanted to better understand their relevance in the 21st century. She also wondered if they might serve to help unite our fractured country. [Rebroadcast]

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Zika—The Emerging Epidemic

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Aug 23, 2016


New York Times reporter Donald McNeil’s new book begins with a mysterious illness that broke out in Brazil in March 2015. The rash and flu-like symptoms were temporary and few were hospitalized. When the Zika virus was pinned as the culprit, Brazil’s health minister brushed it aside as “a benign disease.” Then, nine months later, the babies arrived. Babies with tiny heads. McNeil’s new book tells the story of Zika and he joins us Thursday to assess the very real threat posed by the emerging epidemic.

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A Conversation with Lt. Governor Spencer Cox

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Aug 22, 2016


When Governor Gary Herbert appointed Spencer Cox as Utah’s Lieutenant Governor in 2013, his communications team suggested that Cox edit his bio. They wanted him to take out the part about being in a rock band. But Spencer Cox says that’s what’s wrong with politicians. They’re so worried about re-election, they’re afraid to say “I play the bass.” Monday, Cox joins Doug to talk about unconventional political choices, his 100-mile commute, and why he’s still rockin’ bass lines with his band UpSide.

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A Clockwork Orange

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Aug 19, 2016


Author Anthony Burgess said his novella A Clockwork Orange should have been forgotten, but because of Stanley Kubrick's film, it seemed destined to live on. It's the story of the barbaric passions of a British teen and the state's attempt to impose a mechanistic morality over his free-will. This weekend, The Salt Lake Film Society is screening the film, so Friday, we're rebroadcasting our conversation with the scholar Andrew Biswell. He joined us to explain why Burgess said the point of the book has been widely misunderstood. (Rebroadcast)

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On Trails

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Aug 18, 2016


In 2009, while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths beneath our feet. On every scale of life on earth, he says, trails form that “reduce an overwhelming array of choices to a single expeditious route.” But how do they form? Why do some paths improve while others disappear? How does order emerge from chaos? Moor joins us Thursday to explore how pathways serve as an essential guiding force for trailblazers and trail followers, alike.

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Local Music: Quiet Oaks

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Aug 17, 2016


The history of Salt Lake City quintet Quiet Oaks is anything but quiet. Four of the band mates played together in a group that broke up after a falling-out with a frontman. Rather than call it quits, they decided to rebuild as Quiet Oaks, refining their take on classic rock into the sound they’ve always aspired to. Now on the western leg of a 42-show tour across America, Quiet Oaks joins us Wednesday to discuss their music and picking up the pieces to become the band they’ve always wanted.

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The Ghost of Eternal Polygamy

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Aug 16, 2016


The LDS Church ended the practice of polygamy more than a century ago, but author and activist Carol Lynn Pearson says the idea is “alive and unwell” in Mormon theology. According to doctrine, a man can still be spiritually sealed to multiple wives and those plural marriages are a reality in heaven. Pearson has gathered stories from more than 8000 faithful and former LDS Church members, and joins Doug Tuesday to explain why she says polygamy is still haunting Mormons today.

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Through the Lens: Hooligan Sparrow

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Aug 15, 2016


Monday, we continue our Through the Lens series with a thrilling exploration of the power of protest and the efforts to contain it. Filmmaker Nanfu Wang will join us to talk about her documentary film Hooligan Sparrow, which follows the efforts of activist Ye Haiyan as she and fellow protestors work to shed light on sexual exploitation in China. They’re marked as enemies of the state and routinely harassed by thugs, and the web of trouble also threatens Wang’s film, not to mention her personal safety.

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Labor of Love

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Aug 12, 2016


From Match.com to Tinder, there are all kinds of ways single people meet each other in today’s tech-driven world. It was a whole lot simpler and, some would say, better just a generation ago – what happened to meeting someone and asking them to dinner? According to scholar Moira Weigel, this is nothing new. As dating has changed throughout American history, people have questioned matchmaking practices. Weigel joins us Friday to explore the transformation of dating. Her book is called Labor of Love.

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American Utopianism

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Aug 10, 2016


What should the future look like? That’s the question posed by ambitious, sometimes delusional Americans in the early 1800s who dedicated themselves to creating new ways of living. You had Mother Ann Lee’s Shakers; the Oneida community in New York; New Harmony, Indiana; intentional communities inspired by French socialist Charles Fourier; and the roots of a communist paradise in Texas. Wednesday, the writer Chris Jennings joins us to explore the idealism and the lasting impact of these five utopian movements. (Rebroadcast)

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Shankar Vedantam and the Hidden Brain

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Aug 09, 2016


NPR’s Shankar Vedantam says that in some ways, human behavior is the ultimate frontier of science. After all, there’s a lot we don’t know about why behave the way we do. But if we can get a glimpse at the unconscious patterns that influence us, Vedantam argues we have the potential to make big changes in our lives and our world. Shankar Vedantam is host of the popular podcast Hidden Brain, and Tuesday, he joins us to explain how science and storytelling can improve the human experience.

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The 2016 Utah Electorate

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Aug 08, 2016


Monday, we’re putting Utah’s voters under the microscope, and we’re particularly curious about what motivates the state’s Mormon electorate. Utah has long been a sure bet for the Republican Party. This year, the party’s presidential candidate is putting Utah’s partisan loyalty to the test. But where does that loyalty come from? What matters most to the state’s electorate? And are voters here really all that different from the average American? A panel of guests will join us, and we hope you will, too.

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Machiavelli's Advice to Citizens

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Aug 05, 2016


Niccolò Machiavelli lived hundreds of years ago, and though he was a gifted political strategist, he knew nothing about democratic republics. So the scholar Maurizio Viroli recognizes that it’s a bit extravagant to consult a 15th-century Florentine for electoral advice in 21st-century America. But Machiavelli, Viroli says, remains the most competent, honest and disinterested political counselor we could ask for. Viroli joins us Friday to examine what Machiavelli can teach us about choosing leaders. (Rebroadcast)

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Do You Dream in Color?

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Aug 04, 2016


Laurie Rubin has been blind since birth, and she says people imagine her world to be a dark place. But the accomplished mezzo-soprano and lyricist experiences color all around her. She says yellow is an afternoon when birds are singing; green is her backyard; blue is an early morning or the key of G. Rubin is performing in Park City this weekend, and Thursday, she joins Doug to talk about growing up blind, learning to navigate the world, and dreaming in color.

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The Sting of the Wild

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Aug 03, 2016


Entomologist Justin O. Schmidt is on a mission. Some say it’s a brave exploration, others shake their heads in disbelief. His goal: to catalogue the painful effects of stinging insects on humans, mainly using himself as the gauge. Most people regard stinging insects as horrible pests, but by investigating their lifestyles and adaptations, Schmidt hopes to spread his passion for the inherently interesting story every animal on earth has to tell. Schmidt joins us to explore the world of stinging insects.

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White Trash

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Aug 02, 2016


We like to think of America as a class-free society where anyone who works hard can achieve economic success. Historian Nancy Isenberg says it’s a promise as old as our nation, and that it’s always been a myth. She argues that landowners and the elite have only valued the poor for their labor - while describing them as vagrants, crackers, squatters, and rednecks. Isenberg joins us Tuesday to trace what she calls the 400-year untold history of class in America. Her book is called White Trash.

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The Gene

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Aug 01, 2016


Monday, the writer and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee is our guest. He’s written a new book that tells the epic tale of our quest to unravel the human genome. It’s the story of a long lineage of scientists—from Mendel, to Darwin, Watson, Crick, and countless others—and their efforts to understand the workings of the very threads of our existence. But how, Mukherjee wonders, can we best apply that knowledge? And what does it mean to be human when we can read and write our own genetic information? (Rebroadcast)

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The Work of the Dead

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Jul 29, 2016


Why is it that we care for the dead? The philosopher Diogenes suggested that his corpse simply be tossed over the city wall, but it’s an idea that seems unthinkable. Historian Thomas Laqueur says bodies matter because we’ve decided they do - from prehistoric times, regardless of faith or creed. Laqueur’s book explores the ways we’ve ritualized and remembered the dead throughout history. Friday, he joins Doug to explain how our relationship to the dead has helped shape the modern world. (Rebroadcast)

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