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PRI: Radio West Podcast by Doug Fabrizio

PRI: Radio West Podcast

by Doug Fabrizio

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Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. Listeners can join live at (801) 585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org. The conversation continues on our on-line discussion board at www.kuer.org. RadioWest is broadcast live on KUER 90.1 and on XM Public Radio at 11:00 a.m. Mountain/1:00 p.m. Eastern.


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On the Front Lines of Opioid Abuse

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Sep 30, 2016


Friday, we’re following up on our conversation about opioid addiction in America with three people on the front lines of the epidemic right here in Utah. Huntsman Cancer Institute anesthesiologist Shane Brogan, treatment specialist David Felt, and DEA Agent Jeff Bryan joined Doug at the 2016 Utah Heroin and Opioid Summit. They talked about the problems they face in addressing opioid abuse and about what measures could make a difference as they work to help people crippled by addiction.

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Fewer Cars, More Bikes, Better Cities

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Sep 29, 2016


Making it easy for people to get from Point A to Point B is a big concern in urban areas. Here in Utah most people simply drive. Urban designer Mikael Colville-Andersen wants that to change. He wants more people to bike and walk, not for their health, but because they’re the easiest ways to get around. They aren’t, yet, but Colville-Andersen wants to change that, too. He joins us Thursday to discuss how better designed cities can make it effortless for people to get from here to there without driving. (Rebroadcast)

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America's Opioid Epidemic

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Sep 28, 2016


Each month, 24 people die from prescription drug overdoses in Utah, a statistic that makes us 4th in the nation for drug poisoning deaths. Here and across the country, opioid addiction is a problem that effects people from all walks of life. The journalist Sam Quinones calls it an epidemic, and Wednesday, he joins us to explain how we came to this crisis. We’ll talk about how opioids work on the brain, how they were developed, and how Quinones says they’ve been relentlessly marketed to patients.

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Through the Lens: Splinters of a Nation

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Sep 27, 2016


During World War II, 8,000 German prisoners of war were interned in Utah. Many of them worked alongside American civilians on the state’s farms and factories, where unlikely friendships and lasting memories were created between sworn enemies. In a new documentary film, filmmaker Scott Porter explores this little-known chapter in Utah history, the end of which was marked by a tragic massacre in the rural town of Salina. Porter joins us Tuesday to talk about his film. It’s called Splinters of a Nation.

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Engineering Eden

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Sep 26, 2016


In the summer of 1972, a young man named Harry Walker left his family’s farm in Alabama and headed for adventure in Yellowstone where he was killed by a grizzly bear. The subsequent court battle raised serious questions about how we manage America’s national parks. In a new book, the writer Jordan Fisher Smith traces Walker’s fatal path, which led him to questions about how much humans should try to engineer nature and soften its sharp edges for our own enjoyment. Jordan joins us Monday to talk about it.

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Coyote America

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Sep 23, 2016


Wednesday we’re talking about a homegrown American success: coyotes. The country has been at war with the iconic species since white settlers first reached the heartland plains. But coyotes, according to historian Dan Flores, not only survived our assault on them, they simultaneously expanded their range across the continent and into our cities. Flores joins us Friday to explore the coyote’s fascinating story of resilience and adaptability and how it parallels our own version of Manifest Destiny.

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The Last Ship

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Sep 22, 2016


The musician Sting says writer’s block led him back to the hometown he had worked so hard to escape. Wallsend was a shipbuilding center in Northern England, but he was never interested in being a shipwright. The stories of the men and women there called to him though, and they became the basis for his musical The Last Ship. Pioneer Theatre Company opened its production last week, and Thursday, director Karen Azenberg and others join us to talk about the themes of work, identity, and coming home.

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Pinpoint

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Sep 21, 2016


Even if you didn’t use GPS to find your way around town today, there’s every chance it touched your life. The Global Positioning System is now integrated into almost every part of modern existence. It helps land planes, route cell phone calls, predict the weather, grow food, and regulate global finance. Our guest Thursday, Greg Milner, has written a book that traces the history of GPS. He also examines the frightening costs of our growing dependence on it.

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The Nutty Putty Cave Tragedy

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Sep 19, 2016


In November 2009, John Jones, his brother, and a number of friends, went exploring in Nutty Putty Cave. Thousands of people visited the popular cave every year, but Jones was the last tourist to ever delve into its passages. Deep in an unmapped portion, Jones got stuck, and rescuers worked for dozens of hours to free him. Jones died in the cave, which was later permanently sealed. A new feature film tells the story of the Nutty Putty tragedy and Tuesday we’re talking about it.

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Local Music: 3hattrio

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Sep 19, 2016


What do you get if you cross a cowboy singer, a Caribbean percussionist and a classical violinist? Well, if it happens in Virgin, Utah, folklorist and musician Hal Cannon says you get a new kind of Western music. He’s the cowboy singer and 1/3 of 3hattrio. They’ve just released their third album, and Monday, he joins us along with career musician Greg Istock and 19-year-old Eli Wrankle to explain why they say the West was ready for a new genre and how they began creating “desert music.”

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How To Be a Tudor

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Sep 16, 2016


To understand how our forebears lived, of course you’ll read period records, diaries and literature. There would still be things you wouldn’t fully grasp though, like how they smelled. So when historian Ruth Goodman wanted to understand 16th century English life, she “tudored.” She skipped bathing, brushed her teeth with soot, and slept on rushes. The result of her adventure is a new book called How to Be a Tudor, and she joins Doug for a dawn-to-dusk guide to Tudor life. (Rebroadcast)

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Corporate Dollars, Academic Integrity

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Sep 15, 2016


Recently, KUER reported on an environmental activist with concerns about corporations like Kennecott Land being listed as “friends” of the University of Utah’s Environmental Humanities Program. Carl Ingwell says they don’t reflect environmental values, and shouldn’t be associated with the program. But as higher education faces continued cut-backs in public spending, what is the proper relationship between corporate donors and university researchers? And what do each get out of the bargain? Thursday, Doug’s guests help us work through those and other questions.

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Defying the Nazis

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Sep 14, 2016


In January 1939, Unitarian minister Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha received a call: would they travel to Europe to help Jewish dissidents and refugees under threat of Nazi persecution? While few Americans were paying attention to Hitler’s growing power, the Sharps agreed to the dangerous mission. A new PBS film explores their incredible work, and Wednesday, filmmaker Artemis Joukowsky joins us to talk about how the Sharp’s actions saved hundreds and altered the course of their own lives.

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Being a Beast

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Sep 13, 2016


Charles Foster wanted to know what it was like to be a beast. What it was really like. So he tried it out. He slept in a dirt hole and ate earthworms like a badger. He chased shrimp like an otter. He spent hours rooting in trashcans like an urban fox. A passionate naturalist, Foster came to realize that every creature creates a different world in its brain and lives in that world. He joins us Tuesday to talk about his experiment and the values of wildness, both outside us and within us.

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Utah's Youth Suicide Problem

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Sep 12, 2016


Monday, we’re talking about Utah’s youth suicide problem. A recent report declared suicide the leading cause of death for the state’s 10- to 17-year-old kids. On top of that, the suicide rate here is more double the national average. Health officials, suicide prevention advocates, educators, and parents are struggling for answers, as are kids themselves. We’ll look at the many factors contributing to the problem and ask why suicide is such a problem here in Utah.

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Sebastian Junger on Conflict and Coming Together

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Sep 09, 2016


The journalist Sebastian Junger has noticed that for many veterans, and even some civilians, war feels better than peace, and he has a theory about why that might be. War, he says, compels us to band together and support one another in pursuit of a clear goal. But under the normal conditions of modern culture, we lose those connections, and we feel lonely and lost. Friday, Junger joins us to discuss why we’re stronger when we come together and what tribal societies can teach us about leading meaningful lives. (Rebroadcast)

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American Heiress

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Sep 08, 2016


Thursday, our guest is author Jeffrey Toobin, who’s written a book about the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst. Hearst was 19 and heir to her family’s fortune when the “Symbionese Liberation Army” took her, and it soon seemed that she had adopted their incoherent, revolutionary cause. We’ll explore the controversy over Hearst’s involvement in their crimes, the atmosphere that gave birth to the SLA, and why Toobin says the story sheds light on a time when America was on the brink of a nervous breakdown.

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The Gospel According to Ralphael

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Sep 07, 2016


In a run-down commercial block in Salt Lake City, Ralphael Plescia has spent some 50 years making art that tells the story of creation as he understands it. He’s hollowed out tunnels, built narrow bridges over bubbling groundwater, and his sculptures are embedded in the walls. Wednesday, we profile a new short film that asks why Ralphael has made this his life work and what will happen to it when he dies. We’ll also explore other “outsider” Utah artists who bring a unique view to our world.

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American Eugenics

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Sep 06, 2016


Journalist Adam Cohen has said if you want to learn about an institution, you look at where it’s gone wrong. For Cohen, Buck v Bell is a moment when the US Supreme Court went terribly wrong. Its 1927 decision upheld eugenics laws, and led to the forced sterilization of Carrie Buck and some 70,000 “undesirables” declared “feebleminded.” Tuesday, Cohen joins us to explain how Americans - and some of our most revered legal minds - succumbed to racism and classism in the name of “uplifting” the human race. (Rebroadcast)

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How Eloquence Works

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Sep 05, 2016


We all know eloquence when we hear it. The skillful delivery of language delights us, captivates us, persuades and moves us. Most importantly, says the linguist David Crystal, speakers and listeners alike enjoy eloquent speech. Crystal has dissected the qualities and practice of eloquence. Partly, he wants to better understand how it's achieved. He also wants to show that eloquence is a talent everyone who uses words can possess. Crystal joins us Monday to examine how the gift of gab works. (Rebroadcast)

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