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PRI: Radio West Podcast by Doug Fabrizio

PRI: Radio West Podcast

by Doug Fabrizio

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Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. Listeners can join live at (801) 585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org. The conversation continues on our on-line discussion board at www.kuer.org. RadioWest is broadcast live on KUER 90.1 and on XM Public Radio at 11:00 a.m. Mountain/1:00 p.m. Eastern.


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The Women Who Measured the Cosmos

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Apr 25, 2017


Tuesday, we’re talking about the 19 th -century women who measured the cosmos. Science journalist Dava Sobel is among our guests. Her latest book is about the women employed by Harvard Observatory to serve as “human computers.” They did calculations based on the observations of their male counterparts, but became astronomical pioneers in their own right. Pygmalion Theatre Company is staging a play based on the life of one of these remarkable women, which gives us an excuse to talk about them and discoveries.

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The Chaffetz Effect

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Apr 24, 2017


Last week, Jason Chaffetz abruptly announced he would not seek reelection for Utah’s 3 rd congressional district in 2018. He’s also said he might not even finish the term he started just 4 months ago, which has a number of Utah Republicans eyeing his seat. Monday, we’re talking about Chaffetz’s decision and its fallout. We’ll ask what it means for the congressional oversight committee Chaffetz chairs and how his next moves, including a possible run for governor, could affect Utah politics.

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The Case Against Sugar

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Apr 21, 2017


In America today, nearly 10% of the population has diabetes; more than two-thirds of us are overweight or obese; and one out of 10 kids are thought to have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The journalist Gary Taubes blames all of these afflictions on one culprit: sugar. In his latest book, Taubes argues that sugar is the “principal cause of the chronic diseases most likely to kill us … in the 21 st century.” Taubes joins us to make the case against sugar and why we’d be healthier without it. (Rebroadcast)

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Cannibalism

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Apr 20, 2017


Scientists have long regarded cannibalism as a bizarre phenomenon with little biological significance. In Western culture, it’s regarded as the ultimate taboo, the subject of horror movies or sensational tales of real-life flesh-eaters. But the true nature of cannibalism, says zoologist Bill Schutt, is even more intriguing, and more normal, than the misconceptions we often accept as fact. Schutt has written about the natural and cultural history of cannibalism, and he joins us Thursday to talk about it.

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Our Homes & Their Histories

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Apr 19, 2017


When novelist Ella Joy Olsen set out to write her first book, she wanted a topic close to home. And what could be more tangible then the walls surrounding her? Olsen’s first book is an imagined genealogy of her house, exploring the lives of five women who occupied the same space over a century. We’re using Olsen’s work as a jumping off point to talk about how the history of our houses effects the way we live in them today.

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Meeting the Challenge of Immigration

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Apr 18, 2017


Ali Noorani says America’s debate over immigration isn’t just a political issue, it’s a cultural one. Noorani directs the National Immigration Forum, and he says at the heart of the debate is fear about jobs, security, and our identity as a nation. So, Noorani set out to look for solutions not in the halls of government, but in churches, businesses, and communities across the country. Noorani is in Utah this week; he’ll join us to talk about meeting the challenge of American immigration.

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The Rise of Addictive Technology

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Apr 17, 2017


Marketing professor Adam Alter begins his new book by noting that Steve Jobs didn’t let his own children use an iPad, a product he invented, because he was worried they’d get addicted to it. That’s what Alter’s book is about: our increasing addiction to technology. These days, we aren’t just hooked on substances, like drugs and alcohol. We’re addicted to video games, social media, porn, email, and lots more. Alter joins us Monday to explore the business and psychology of irresistible technologies.

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Eleanor and Hick

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Apr 14, 2017


Friday, we’re telling the story of the unconventional relationship that deeply influenced Eleanor Roosevelt. When FDR entered the White House in 1932, Eleanor feared her independent life would take a back seat to the ceremonial role of first lady. But on the campaign trail she had met Lorena Hickok, a feisty reporter who would become her adviser, confidante, and lover. Biographer Susan Quinn joins Doug to explain how Eleanor and “Hick” used their bond to better depression-ravaged America. (Rebroadcast)

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Sexual Assault at Utah's Universities

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Apr 13, 2017


Earlier this week, the Salt Lake Tribune won a Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of rape at several Utah universities. Their reporting on the subject began last year when a BYU student came forth with complaints about the school’s mistreatment of sexual assault victims. Further reporting uncovered more problems at other colleges, including numerous rape allegations against a Utah State University athlete. Thursday, the Tribune ’s prize-winning reporters join us to discuss their investigation and its impact.

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The Gardener and the Carpenter

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Apr 12, 2017


The psychologist Alison Gopnik is worried about modern day parenting, including her own. It’s too much like being a carpenter, she says, where you shape chosen materials into a final, preconceived product. Kids don’t work like that. In her latest book, Gopnik suggests parents think less like carpenters and more like gardeners: creating safe, nurturing spaces in which children can flourish. Gopnik joins us Wednesday to discuss how we can raise better kids by changing our approach to parenting. (Rebroadcast)

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The Outbreak of World War I

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Apr 10, 2017


One hundred years ago, America entered the First World War. It was sparked by one of history’s most notorious wrong turns. That single blunder ignited a conflict that would claim more than 37 million casualties and sow the seeds of geopolitical strife for generations to come. This week, the PBS program American Experience is airing a three-part examination of WWI. Podcast host Dan Carlin appears in the program, and he joins us Monday to discuss the war’s outbreak and its place in history.

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Healing the Warrior's Heart

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Apr 07, 2017


When Larry Cesspooch returned from the Vietnam War, his family told him to “go into the Sundance and wipe yourself off.” Cesspooch is a member of the Ute Indian Tribe, and cleansing ceremonies are a deep part of Native American warrior traditions. Now, with suicides accounting for more US military deaths than combat, people are looking for ways to deal with the horrors of PTSD. Friday, our conversation with director Taki Telonidis about his film exploring how these traditions could help our veterans. (Rebroadcast)

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"Messing" With Shakespeare

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Apr 06, 2017


A production of Shakespeare’s The Two Noble Kinsmen is opening this weekend in Salt Lake, and if you’re intimidated by the Bard’s language, here’s the good news: it’s in modern English. Oregon Shakespeare Festival hired 36 playwrights to rework Shakespeare, among them the University of Utah’s Tim Slover. But here’s the question: after 400 years, should we be messing with William Shakespeare? Doug talks to scholars Daniel Pollack-Pelzner, James Shapiro, and to Slover about “translating” a classic.

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Being a Beast

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Apr 05, 2017


Charles Foster wanted to know what it was like to be a beast. What it was really like. So he tried it out. He slept in a dirt hole and ate earthworms like a badger. He chased shrimp like an otter. He spent hours rooting in trash cans like an urban fox. A passionate naturalist, Foster came to realize that every creature creates a different world in its brain and lives in that world. He joins us to talk about his experiment and the values of wildness, both outside us and within us. (Rebroadcast)

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Through the Lens: God Knows Where I Am

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Apr 04, 2017


In 2012, Linda Bishop was found dead in an abandoned house in New Hampshire after a brutal winter. She’d been living on apples and rainwater, and she’d kept a journal. She was a well-educated mother diagnosed with severe mental illness. Drawing from her journal, filmmakers Jedd and Todd Wider made a touching portrait of Bishop’s life and its challenges. Their documentary God Knows Where I Am is the next film in our Through the Lens series, and the Widers join us Tuesday to talk about it.

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A Conversation with Ty Mansfield

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, Apr 03, 2017


Monday, we’re talking about the delicate balance of being religiously conservative and attracted to the same sex. Ty Mansfield is a family therapist and he’s attracted to men. He’s also married to a woman, has kids, and is a faithful Mormon. Mansfield believes that human sexuality is fluid enough for some gay people - not all - but some to be perfectly happy married to someone of the opposite sex. Mansfield joins us to share his own story, and to talk about what he’s learning about sexuality and happiness.

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Ghostland

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Mar 31, 2017


Friday, we’re taking a haunted tour of America with writer Colin Dickey. Don’t worry though, we won’t try to convince you that ghosts or the paranormal are necessarily real. Dickey’s new book explores the bigger cultural questions behind these tales. Traveling to haunted mansions, brothels, industrial ruins, parks, and more, he asks why we tell these stories and how they help us make sense of our world. Dickey joins us to talk about what he calls “an American history in haunted places.” (Rebroadcast)

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The Long Walk

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, Mar 30, 2017


In his memoir, Brian Castner comes right out and tells you he’s crazy. Castner was the leader of a bomb disposal team in Iraq, a gory, dangerous job. But he never considered what life would be like when he got home. So to try to figure out who that crazy person was, he started writing. His 2012 book is the basis for an opera that’s being performed in Salt Lake City. Thursday, Castner and others join us to talk about the costs of war, and how you make art out of an experience like that.

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The Crime of Complicity

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, Mar 29, 2017


If you see something evil happening, should you be held accountable if you don’t try to stop it? Legal scholar Amos Guiora’s grandparents were murdered in the Holocaust, and a few years ago he set out on a journey to explore how the Nazi atrocities were allowed to happen. He’s now written a book that looks at not only the moral imperative for bystanders, but the legal obligation to act. Wednesday, Guiora joins Doug to explain why he believes not taking action is criminal.

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When Race, Sport, and Religion Collide

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, Mar 28, 2017


Students at Brigham Young University are required to follow strict moral guidelines known as the Honor Code. Most students at the school are prepared to meet the code’s rigid demands, but some aren’t, says Darron Smith, a former BYU professor. Smith says that many black and/or non-Mormon athletes may not fully anticipate the challenges of the Honor Code, and he argues that they’re disproportionately punished for violating it. He’ll join us Tuesday to discuss what happens when race, religion and sports collide.

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