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PRI: Radio West Podcast by Doug Fabrizio

PRI: Radio West Podcast

by Doug Fabrizio

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Hosted by Doug Fabrizio, KUER's award-winning program features conversations with authors, politicians, artists and others. Listeners can join live at (801) 585-WEST or radiowest@kuer.org. The conversation continues on our on-line discussion board at www.kuer.org. RadioWest is broadcast live on KUER 90.1 and on XM Public Radio at 11:00 a.m. Mountain/1:00 p.m. Eastern.


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Hillary Clinton's Doomed Campaign

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, May 25, 2017


Hillary Clinton was regarded as the front-runner in the lead up to 2016 election. She was arguably the most experienced presidential candidate in history, running against a man with no political experience. So how did she lose? In a new book, reporters Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes try to answer that question. Yes, she faced external challenges, but Parnes and Allen place much of the blame on the candidate herself. They’ll join us to explain how Clinton made her sure-thing victory an uphill battle.

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The Attention Merchants

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, May 24, 2017


Wherever you turn these days, commercials, sponsored social media, and other advertising efforts await your attention. The influential thinker Tim Wu says we have the “attention merchants” to thank for that. In a new book, Wu argues that the concerted efforts of advertisers to attract our attention at every opportunity has made us more distracted and less focused than ever before. Wu joins us to explore the rise of the attention merchants and the human costs of their efforts. [Rebroadcast]

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Elephants on the Rampage

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, May 23, 2017


Tuesday, we’re talking about conservatism and whether today’s Republican Party is living up to the label. Our guest is journalist and BYU law student Sara Jarman, who has just published a book which argues true conservatism is contemplative and measured, principles that have been lost over the years. Jarman says that whatever your views, this matters because a healthy political system requires a balance between conservative and progressive forces. Her book is called “Elephants on the Rampage.”

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A Conversation with Thomas Wirthlin McConkie

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, May 22, 2017


Thomas Wirthlin McConkie is a descendent of two highly influential Mormon leaders. And yet, his close ties to the LDS Church didn’t insulate him from questioning his faith. He left the church as a teenager and found spiritual fulfillment in Zen Buddhism. After almost 20 years, he returned to Mormonism, and he wants to help others navigate their own faith crises. McConkie joins us Monday to discuss how the tools of developmental psychology can help guide us through faith transitions.

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Chasing the Last Laugh

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, May 19, 2017


Friday, we’re telling the story of what author Richard Zacks calls Mark Twain’s “raucous and redemptive round-the-world comedy tour.” Twain was once America’s highest paid writer, but he was also a remarkably bad businessman. In 1895, with his career on the rocks and with what today would be millions in debt, Twain embarked on a 5-continent speaking tour he hoped would save him. Zacks joins Doug to talk about Twain’s wildly popular humor, his missteps, and what drove his quest for redemption. (Rebroadcast)

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President Trump and US Intelligence Agencies

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, May 18, 2017


Thursday, we’re talking about President Donald Trump’s relationship with the country’s intelligence agencies. Our guest is Tim Weiner, who has written books about the FBI, CIA, and President Richard Nixon. He warns that Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey and his crusade to stop leaks have historical precedents in Nixon’s ultimately self-defeating actions. We’ll talk about that, and explore what Trump’s leak of classified information to Russia could mean for national security.

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Messy

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, May 17, 2017


In his new book, the journalist and economist Tim Harford makes an argument that’s a tough sell for a culture hooked on neatness, structure, and tidying up. Harford comes to the defense of messiness, of inconvenient situations, clutter, and difficulty. They’re not as bad as we might think, he says, and in story after story he shows how disorder can spur creativity, nurture resilience, and bring out our very best. Harford joins us Wednesday to explore the messy foundations that often underlie success.

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The First Love Story

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, May 16, 2017


Tuesday, we’re talking about the oldest relationship in the Christian world: Adam and Eve. The writer Bruce Feiler says the two don’t get the credit they deserve, and in a new book he aims to redeem them for a new generation. According to Feiler, the tale of Adam and Eve is a timeless myth that still has much to teach us. They confronted the ultimate human fear—loneliness—and defeated it with the ultimate human expression—love. Feiler joins us to explore the meaning of the first love story.

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Overdressed

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, May 15, 2017


Try to imagine 18 tons of clothes. It’s the image journalist and author Elizabeth Cline said surprised her the most while researching her book about the way Americans dress. That’s because that pile represented three-days of donations to one thrift store in one U.S. city. And what’s the impact of the cheap fashion we buy and toss on such a regular basis? Cline is coming to Utah, and Monday she joins Doug to explain what it means for our economy, our environment, and for our culture.

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Casanova

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, May 12, 2017


The name Casanova is synonymous with seduction and sexuality. And while biographer Laurence Bergreen says that Giacomo Casanova’s favorite place was a brothel, it might surprise you that his second favorite was a library. The 18th century Venetian was born in poverty. He was intent on working up the social ladder though and saw sex as both pleasure and a “weapon of class destruction.” Bergreen joins Doug to talk about Casanova’s writing and philosophy … as well as his 120+ lovers. (Rebroadcast)

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Phenomena

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, May 11, 2017


If you’re a skeptic, you’re going to be outraged by the “scientific projects” conducted by the U.S. government into mind reading and other paranormal phenomena. For more than 40 years the government hired magicians and hypnotists to try to figure out what the enemy was up to. Investigative journalist Annie Jacobsen’s latest book tells the story of this top secret program, and Thursday, she joins us to explain what would make people spend so much time, energy, and money on such strange ideas.

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The Importance of Rest

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, May 10, 2017


Wednesday, we’re talking about the value of rest. Of taking a break. From everything. For most of us, overwork is the new normal and rest is an afterthought. But the scholar Alex Soojung-Kim Pang says that by dismissing the importance of rest in our lives we stifle our ability to think creatively and truly recharge. Pang will join us to explain how long walks, afternoon naps, vigorous exercise, and "deep play" stimulate creative work and sustain creative lives. (Rebroadcast)

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Native Americans and Bears Ears

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, May 09, 2017


A coalition of five sovereign Native American tribes was instrumental in last year’s declaration of Bears Ears National Monument. Those tribes all lived in the region long before white settlers, and tribal members say they depend on the Bears Ears for food, shelter, healing, and spiritual sustenance. For them, the landscape is alive. It has a heartbeat. It’s a valued member of the family. Tuesday, we'll talk about how Native Americans think about and relate to Bears Ears.

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The Life and Legacy of Richard Nixon

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, May 08, 2017


“Few came so far, so fast, and so alone,” writes John Farrell in a new biography of President Richard Nixon. Nixon was an idealistic dreamer when he returned from World War II, and he quickly scaled the political ladder. After winning the presidency in 1969, he and his staff pursued progressive reforms and opened relations with China. But Nixon, says Farrell, had another, darker legacy: a divided and polarized America. Farrell joins us Monday to discuss Richard Nixon and the world he made.

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The Revenge of Analog

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, May 05, 2017


A funny thing happened on the way to digital utopia: we rekindled our love affairs with the very analog goods and ideas that tech gurus insisted we no longer needed. What once looked outdated—stuff like paper notebooks, LP records, and board games—is cool again, breathing new life into many businesses that deal in tangible things. The writer David Sax calls this trend the “Revenge of Analog.” In a new book, he explores the real things renaissance, and he’ll join us to talk about it. (Rebroadcast)

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High Noon and the Hollywood Blacklist

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Thu, May 04, 2017


The film High Noon was a hit when it debuted in 1952, and it remains a revered Hollywood classic. But the tale of a sheriff awaiting a showdown held deeper meaning for screenwriter Carl Foreman. For him, it was a political parable. Communist fear gripped the nation, and Foreman was called before the House Committee on Un-American Activities to answer for his past. Journalist Glenn Frankel has written a book about the making of High Noon and its high-stakes allegory. He joins us Thursday to talk about it.

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America's National Monuments Under Review

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Wed, May 03, 2017


Last week, President Donald Trump ordered Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review the designation of every national monument declared via the Antiquities Act since January 1, 1996. The order is especially relevant to Utah. Grand Staircase-Escalante was the only monument proclaimed in ’96. And Secretary Zinke said he would in short order make a specific recommendation on the state’s new Bears Ears Monument. Wednesday, we’re asking what this review means for Utah. We’ll also discuss the history and future of the Antiquities Act.

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Through the Lens: Bending the Arc

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Tue, May 02, 2017


Tuesday, we’re continuing our Through the Lens series with documentary director and editor Pedro Kos. His film Bending the Arc premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, and it tells the story of doctors and activists on the front lines of a global health crisis. It profiles people like Paul Farmer who have to figure out how to heal patients with impossible afflictions in impossible conditions. We’re screening the film Wednesday night in partnership with the Utah Film Center.

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American Heiress

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Mon, May 01, 2017


Monday, our guest is author Jeffrey Toobin , who’s written a book about the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst. Hearst was 19 and heir to her family’s fortune when the “Symbionese Liberation Army” took her, and it soon seemed that she had adopted their incoherent, revolutionary cause. We’ll explore the controversy over Hearst’s involvement in their crimes, the atmosphere that gave birth to the SLA, and why Toobin says the story sheds light on a time when America was on the brink of a nervous breakdown. (Rebroadcast)

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The Story of Pain

dfabrizio@kuer.org (Doug Fabrizio) Author: Doug Fabrizio
Fri, Apr 28, 2017


What is pain? You know it when you feel it, but it’s almost impossible to properly describe. And it turns out, our idea of what that suffering is and means has changed significantly over the centuries. Friday, Doug’s guest is British historian Joanna Bourke, who has written a book that investigates “The Story of Pain.” We’ll explore how knowing the history of pain helps us acknowledge our own sorrows and the suffering of others. (Rebroadcast)

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