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The Takeaway Podcast by John Hockenberry

The Takeaway Podcast

by John Hockenberry

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A co-production of WNYC Radio and Public Radio International, in collaboration with The BBC World Service, New York Times Radio and WGBH Boston.


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The Art of the Repeal, Female Athletes Take a Stand, The Endangered Rusty-Patch Bumblebee

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 24, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • President Donald J. Trump issued an ultimatum to Congress on Thursday: Pass the GOP plan to repeal Obamacare, or the Affordable Care Act stays. Will Republicans be able to rise to the challenge? Here to weigh in are Reed Galen, a Republican strategist who worked on both the 2000 and 2004 Bush-Cheney campaigns and worked for John McCain's presidential campaign, and Jeffrey Young, a reporter for The Huffington Post.
  • The U.S. Women's National Hockey Team is one of the best in the world, but the team has threatened to boycott the Ice Hockey World Championships over allegations of unfair pay and treatment by USA Hockey, the national governing body. Lindsay Gibbs, a sports reporter for ThinkProgress, has the details. 
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, shares her list of the best podcasts to listen to on your spring break. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, looks at the big new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including "Life," "Saban’s Power Rangers" and "T2: Trainspotting."
  • Tom Farrey, executive director of the Sports and Society Program at the Aspen Institute and a reporter for ESPN, finds that NCAA basketball is not all it's cracked up to be. The NCAA pitches a vision of opportunity, Farrey says, but his new study paints a very different picture.
  • The rusty-patched bumblebee is officially an endangered species. The bee’s population has dropped more than 90 percent over the past two decades. Sam Droege, head of the Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab at the U.S. Geological Survey, explains. 


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Trump's Growing Russia Problem, Terror in London, Art, Race, and Appropriation

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 23, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • A new report from The Associated Press finds that one of the key players within the 2016 Trump campaign, Paul Manafort, the president's former campaign chair, was reportedly paid for consulting work on behalf of Russian President Vladimir Putin. For details on this story we turn to Matthew Nussbaum, White House reporter at Politico.
  • Billions of dollars were moved out of Russia between 2010 and 2014 in what is described as a "global laundromat" operation, and hundreds of millions of those dollars were handled by British banks, many with outposts in the U.S. Drew Sullivan, editor and co-founder of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, explains. 
  • In a unanimous decision on Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that school districts must give students with disabilities an education that is held to a higher standard. Regina Skyer, founder and manager of the Law Offices of Regina Skyler and Associates, a special education law firm, analyzes the ruling. 
  • On Wednesday, a deadly domestic terrorist attack left at least three people dead and around 40 others wounded in London. Though the assailant was British-born, the Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack. Stephen Farrell, staff editor in the London Bureau for our partner The New York Times, explains what we know so far about the attack. 
  • A big vote is set to take place in the Lebanese parliament this week that could repeal Article 522 of the penal code. That article states that men who rape women can walk free if they marry their victims. Ali Awada, advocacy and campaign manager for the gender-equality campaign group ABAAD, argues that it's time to abolish this law. 
  • A new investigation has uncovered how Greece wasted some $803 million in aid for the refugee crisis. Daniel Howden, the lead reporter in the investigation and senior editor for the news outlet Refugees Deeply, explains. 
  • Artist Dana Schutz is showing a painting of Emmett Till in a casket at the Whitney Museum of Art. Schutz is white, and some artists are protesting her work because they say her interpretation is exploitive, oversteps racial sensitivities, and appropriates the black experience of a horrific and traumatic tragedy. Baruti Kopano, an associate professor at Morgan State University and co-editor of "Soul Thieves: The Appropriation and Misrepresentation of African American Popular Culture," discusses the controversy. 

 



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Closing the Deal on Healthcare, Police Accountablity, A Changing Planet

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 22, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Today, House Republicans are hoping a vote to pass their healthcare bill will move forward a day after President Trump was on Capitol Hill to help close the deal. But there has been a slew of last minute changes made to the bill in order to help secure its passage, including a placeholder fund for older Americans’ tax credits and providing states more flexibility on Medicaid. For details we turn to Margot Sanger Katz, healthcare correspondent for The New York Times.
  • The right to remain silent is the subject of this week's Case In Point from The Marshall Project. The case involves a father who was referred to in court documents as S.S. In New Jersey, he was accused of molesting his four year old daughter. During the interrogation, S.S. repeatedly made comments that his lawyers say were ambiguously invoking his right to silence. WNYC's Sarah Gonzalez sat down with Andrew Cohen, author of Case In Point, and Rebecca Livengood of the ACLU of New Jersey, to discuss the case. 

  • On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the case of County of Los Angeles V. Mendez, and will decide whether the county and two police officers must pay $4 million to a couple shot during a search for someone else. This case will determine if police can be held liable when they needlessly provoke a violent confrontation. Ryan Lockman, a civil rights attorney at Mark B. Frost & Associates in Philadelphia, and writer for the Lock Law Blog, analyzes the case.
  • Who is Alexander Acosta, President Donald Trump's nominee to lead the U.S. Department of Labor? A former member of George W. Bush’s National Labor Relations Board and clerk to Justice Samuel Alito, Acosta, who is unknown to most Americans and even many senators, goes before the Senate Judiciary Committee today. Seth Harris, an attorney, a former deputy secretary and acting U.S. Secretary of Labor under the Obama Administration, looks at some of the big issues Acosta is likely to come across if he is confirmed. 
  • Ranchers in Kansas that were hit hard by wildfires earlier this month are feeling left behind by President Trump, who they helped vote into office. Wildfires have charred 2 million acres across the U.S. so far this year, with more than 650,000 acres being scorched in Kansas alone. Garth Gardiner, who runs Gardiner Angus Ranch in Kansas, weighs in. 
  • Between 2008 and 2016, the Yale program on climate change communication gathered data on how Americans’ think about climate change. Jennifer Marlon, an associate research scientist at Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, shares the findings of this years long research project. 


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The Future of the Supreme Court, U.S. Military Might, Happiness on the Decline

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Mar 21, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Senate confirmation hearing for Supreme Court Justice Nominee Neil Gorsuch continues on Tuesday, with Judge Gorsuch taking questions for the first time. Tim Meyer, a professor of law and an enterprise scholar at Vanderbilt Law School, clerked for Judge Gorsuch of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit from 2007-2008. He explains why he believes Gorsuch should be confirmed. 
  • Former Wisconsin Senator Russ Feingold sat on the Senate judiciary committee for 16 years. He penned an opinion piece for The Guardian this week and argues that Judge Gorsuch's confirmation would bring illegitimacy to the Supreme Court and would “endorse and normalize unconstitutional political games.”
  • Fraser Speaks is a 27-year-old grad student living with bipolar disorder in Charleston, South Carolina. She gets her health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, and is particularly worried about changes to provisions that require insurance agencies to offer plans to people with pre-existing conditions.
  • President Donald Trump is quietly escalating military involvement in places like Syria, where his administration is sending some 400 Marines to the ISIS-controlled city of Raqqa. Several dozen Army rangers are also being sent to the contested area around Manbij and Kuwait, where the U.S. plans to station 2,500 more troops for use in Iraq and Syria. Andrew deGrandpr?, chief editor and Pentagon bureau chief for The Military Times, explains. 
  • Since October, around 255,000 people have been displaced from Mosul as the battle to retake the city from ISIS continues. Existing refugee camps are overwhelmed, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is working to create new spaces for people to find safety. Caroline Gluck, senior public information officer for the U.N. Refugee Agency, weighs in.
  • The 2017 World Happiness Report was released on Monday, and the United States ranks 14th. Norway has risen from 4th place to 1st. John Helliwell, a senior fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and editor of the 2017 World Happiness Report, has the details. 


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Russia Hearings on Capitol Hill, Flexibility in Higher-Ed, The New U.S.-North Korea Relationship

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Mar 20, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • FBI Director James Comey and NSA Head Michael Rogers are testifying before the House Intelligence Committee today about alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Karoun Demirjian, a correspondent for The Washington Post, explains what you need to know. 
  • On Friday, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson determined that diplomatic negotiation with North Korea would no longer be a viable option for nuclear deterrence. Ambassador Christopher Hill, who led the U.S. delegation to the Six Party Talks on North Korea’s nuclear program while serving as the assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2005 to 2009, analyzes the new U.S. approach to North Korea.
  • In 1987, the Senate voted against President Ronald Reagan's nominee for the Supreme Court, Robert Bork. That failure changed the way nominees approach their confirmation hearings. Barbara Dury, a producer with the Retro Report documentary team, explains. 
  • Flexibility has been essential for American community colleges. Early morning and late night lectures and online classes have helped empower students. This semester, Miami-Dade College in South Florida launched it's weekend college program. Rowan Moore Gerety, a reporter with public radio station WLRN, has the details. 
  • Are deportations stopping immigrant women who have been  victims of domestic violence from going to the police in times of crisis? Jasmine Garsd, reporter for Across Women's Lives from Takeaway co-producer PRI, answers. 


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The Future of the EPA, New Movie Releases, Privilege in America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 17, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Under President Trump’s proposed "skinny budget," the Environmental Protection Agency would be cut by 31 percent. We explore the future of the agency under the leadership of Scott Pruitt with Gina McCarthy, former EPA Administrator from 2013 - 2017. 
  • Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant and counterterrorism advisor to President Donald Trump, has been accused of being a member of a Hungarian Nazi group. Greg Jaffe, a reporter with The Washington Post, has the details. 
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, explores how streaming platforms like Amazon, Netflix, and Hulu helped make British television programs popular again in the United States. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the big new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including "Beauty and the Beast," "The Belko Experiment," and "Personal Shopper."
  • Today, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Donald Trump will hold their first in-person bilateral meeting since the election. Constanze Stelzenm?ller, Robert Bosch senior fellow with the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution, explains what you should expect. 


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The 'Skinny Budget,' The New Post-U.S. Trade Era, Jackson and Trump

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 16, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland have blocked President Donald Trump’s travel ban for people coming from parts of the Muslim world. Leon Fresco, an immigration attorney and former deputy assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, explains what's next. Fresco was also head of the Office of Immigration Litigation during the Obama Administration.
  • On Thursday morning, the Trump Administration released its "skinny budget" — a blueprint with total spending for each agency and department. Anna Chu, vice president for income security and education at the National Women's Law Center, has the details. 
  • When it comes to the Republican plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act, what are healthcare providers around the country hoping for, and what are they concerned about? For answers, we turn to Dr. Cecilia Norris, the medical director at the Free Medical Clinic in Iowa City, Iowa. 
  • China’s 2017 National People’s Congress concludes this week, with 3,000 lawmakers convening in Beijing to discuss China’s economic outlook, President Trump, and the nation's trade relationship with the U.S. Keith Bradsher, Shanghai bureau chief of The New York Times, has the latest on the meeting. 
  • On Wednesday, China’s premier said the nation was looking to avoid a trade war with the U.S. But this week, world leaders are meeting in Chile to discuss the Trans-Pacific Partnership in a post-U.S. era of trade. Carlo Dade, director of trade and investment policy for the Canada West Foundation, a Calgary-based think tank, explains. 
  • The Takeaway examines the physical foundation of modern capitalism: Containers. We begin in the Port of Oakland's Outer Harbor, where Alexis Madrigal, editor-at-large at Fusion and creator of the podcast "Containers," explains how containerization changed the global trade market since the Vietnam War. 
  • On Wednesday, President Trump laid a wreath at the Hermitage, Andrew Jackson’s home in Nashville, Tennessee in honor of the former president’s 250th birthday. Jackson’s portrait hangs in the Oval Office, and Trump aligns himself with Jackson’s populist legacy. Dr. Barbara A. Perry, presidential studies director at the Miller Center at University of Virginia, examines the similarities and differences between Presidents Trump and Jackson. 


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A Global Hunger Crisis, Fighting for Religious Freedom, Comedian Todd Barry

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 15, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Late last week, the United Nations announced that 20 million people in four countries — Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen — are facing or at risk of famine, marking what the U.N. has described as the worst humanitarian disaster since the creation of the global governing body. Nigeria has also been considered at risk of famine. Ciaran Donnelly, senior vice president of international programs at the International Rescue Committee, has the details. 

  • Today the Wisconsin HOPE Lab released "Hungry and Homeless in College," a new research report on food and housing insecurity among community college students, including more than 33,000 students at 70 community colleges in 24 states. Two thirds of the students surveyed struggle with food insecurity, and one half with housing insecurity. Sara Goldrick-Rab, one of the authors of new report, a professor of higher education policy and founder of the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, has the details. 

  • The European Court of Justice ruled this week that employers can ban workers from wearing headscarves in certain conditions. Maryam H’madoun, policy officer for the Open Society Justice Initiative and co-founder of Boss of My Own Head, which advocates the rights of Muslim women, weighs in. 

  • Ahead of the deadline for NCAA bracket picks, The Takeaway looks at basketball bracket alternatives and offers tips for selecting your March Madness bracket with Joe Gagliano,a sports betting guru and former NCAA basketball fixer.

  • Military commissaries function as discount grocery stores that offer food at low prices for service members and veterans. The prices are set by a formula and the program is funded by taxpayers. But now, lawmakers and the Department of Defense are looking into alternatives. Dorian Merina, a journalist reporting for the American Homefront Project, explains. 

  • The inclusion of women in the military has come with both successes and failures. MJ Hegar, an Air Force pilot and author of "Shoot Like A Girl: One Woman's Dramatic Fight in Afghanistan and on the Home Front," was the pilot responsible for challenging the Department of Defense's longstanding practice of barring women from thousands of ground combat positions in 2012. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta later rescinded this ban, known as the Ground Combat Exclusion Policy. She shares her story today on The Takeaway. 

  • Comedian Todd Barry is known for his appearances on shows like "Louie" and "Conan," but the subject of his first book chronicles his tour through small cities and secondary markets across the country, where his comedy changes with the crowd. He's the author of the new book, "Thank You for Coming to Hattiesburg."



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The Healthcare Shuffle, Turbulence in Europe, Hunting the Solar System

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Mar 14, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its estimates on the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Though the bill would reduce the federal deficit by $337 billion, the CBO estimates that the GOP plan to repeal and replace the ACA would raise the number of people without health insurance by 24 million by 2026. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, former director of Congressional Budget Office, discusses what the CBO found, and how Republicans are responding. 
  • Jury selection began this week for Derrick Stafford, one of the two African-American deputies charged with second degree murder in the fatal shooting of Jeremy Mardis, a 6-year-old autistic boy who was killed in November 2015. Bodycam footage shows the officers in Marksville, Louisiana shooting a vehicle in a car chase, wounding the driver, and killing the child. Bryn Stole, a criminal justice reporter for The Advocate, has the details on this case. 
  • On Monday, an Egyptian prosecutor ordered the release of former president Hosni Mubarak, who has been serving out a prison sentence in a Cairo military hospital for the better part of the last six years. Mona el-Ghobashy, a scholar of Egyptian politics and lecturer at Columbia University, explains how Egyptians are reacting to this news, and the current state of affairs in Egypt years after the Arab Spring.
  • Elections are being held in the Netherlands on Wednesday. It seems unlikely that Geert Wilders, the anti-immigrant far-right candidate, will become prime minister, but some say that no matter the outcome, "the Netherlands is headed in a nationalist direction." Nick Robins-Early, a world news reporter for The Huffington Post, weighs in. 
  • It's not just the Dutch who are feeling turbulence this election season. A wild presidential campaign season is underway in France after current President Fran?ois Hollande made the unprecedented decision not to run for a second five-year term. The ensuing race to replace him has been mired by numerous political scandals, unusual campaign rhetoric, and a sense of anxiety among voters as election day approaches. Adeline Sire a journalist based in France explains what's at stake. 

  • Asteroid hunter Dr. Carrie Nugent and her colleagues are mapping out where the biggest asteroids in our solar system are so they can then work on preventing collisions with our planet. She's the author of the book "Asteroid Hunters" and works as a staff scientist at Caltech/IPAC.


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ICE Prisons, Trump Says 'You're Fired' to U.S. Attorney, Gentrification in Pittsburgh

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Mar 13, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Tens of thousands of immigrants detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) were forced to work for $1.00 a day, or for nothing at all, according to a new class action lawsuit against one of America's largest private prison companies. Jacqueline Stevens, a professor and director of Northwestern University’s Deportation Research Clinic, has the details.
  • In a tweet sent out Saturday afternoon, Preet Bharara, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, said he had been fired after refusing to resign from his post. The Trump Administration asked Bharara and 45 other U.S. attorneys, all Obama appointees, to resign on Friday. Josh Dawsey, a White House reporter for POLITICO, says this is more than party politics. 
  • President Obama's failure to shutter the Guant?namo Bay detention center is turning into an opportunity for the Trump Administration, which wants to detain terror suspects at the military site. Jennifer Daskal, assistant professor at American University Washington College of Law and a former counsel to the assistant attorney general for National Security at the Department of Justice, explains. 
  • Katharine Kollins, president of the Southeastern Wind Coalition, discusses the fight over renewable energy growth in North Carolina, where Republicans are divided over wind technology. The Tar Heel State's first wind farm may end up being its only one.
  • The global urbanization boom has increased the demand for concrete and asphalt, which requires a tremendous amount of sand mining. The result has created considerable environmental damage, and even a black market for sand. Vince Beiser, a journalist covering the global sand crisis, weighs in. 
  • Dave Zirin, author and sports editor for The Nation and host of the podcast “Edge of Sports,” reflects on the criticism aimed at Colin Kaepernick, who has said he will end his kneeling protests during the national anthem now that he is free agent. 
  • James Logbo, a Pittsburgh transplant, and Nila Peyton, a native of The Steel City, discuss their perspectives on gentrification in this Pennsylvania city. This is the latest segment in The Takeaway's series, "Uncomfortable Truths: Confronting Racism in America."

     



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Getting Healthcare Right, An At Home Guide to SXSW, Children's Literature

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 10, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Under the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid was expanded to provide healthcare to low income families. Some 32 states expanded Medicaid, including Arkansas, a state led by Republican Governor Asa Hutchinson. Gov. Hutchinson explains how people in Arkansas will be effected under the new GOP plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us the latest on the healthcare negotiations on Capitol Hill. 
  • An investigation into the January 29th raid on the Yemeni village of Ghayil reveals a different version of events from what U.S. officials described. Iona Craig, a journalist reporting for The Intercept, explains. 
  • On Friday, South Korea decided to remove suspended President Park Geun-hye from office amid bribery allegations that involve Samsung. Matt Stiles, a special correspondent for the LA Times based in Seoul, has the details. 
  • 2017 is shaping up to be a strong year for horror films. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, explains how our historical anxieties have been represented in the horror films we love to fear.
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian and The Takeaway, previews some of the musical and stand up comedy acts worth checking out at SXSW in Austin in the coming week. For those who can't make it to the festival, there are also several ways to watch from home.


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Voices of Deportation, Reversing Regulations, Artists Come Home for Nina Simone

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 09, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Deportations have continued across the country since President Donald Trump vowed to crack down on undocumented people. A Department of Homeland Security statement issued in February stated that at least 680 individuals had been arrested in deportation raids so far this year. For details we turn to Tania Unzueta, the legal and policy director for the grassroots organization Mijente.
  • Since taking office, the Trump Administration has rolled back 90 regulations, ranging from consumer financial regulations to pollution guidelines. Sally Katzen, a law professor at New York University who worked on crafting regulations in the beginning of the Obama and Clinton administrations, says this is normal practice, but there are some unique aspects to the roll backs from the Trump Administration. 
  • Officials cited zoning issues when voting down a proposed mosque in Bayonne, New Jersey this week. But supporters of the mosque say this was a religiously-motivated decision fueled by fear of Muslims. Matt Katz, a reporter for Takeaway co-producer WNYC, has the details. 
  • House Republicans unveiled their long-awaited plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act this week. Democrats and some moderate Republicans have said the plan will hurt many Americans, but some people will surely benefit. Julie Rovner, chief Washington correspondent for Kaiser Health News, explains. 
  • What patients say and what doctors hear are often two vastly different things. Patients, anxious to convey their symptoms, feel an urgency to “make their case” to their doctors. Doctors, under pressure to be efficient, multitask while patients speak and often miss the key element. Dr. Danielle Ofri, associate professor of medicine at New York University, a practitioner at Bellevue Hospital in New York, author of "What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear," argues that the doctor-patient conversation is the most powerful diagnostic tool. 
  • Four artists have pooled resources in order to purchase the childhood home of Nina Simone in Tryon, North Carolina. The home was put on the market last year and could have been forgotten entirely were it not for the purchase. Adam Pendleton, one of the artists who purchased Ms. Simone’s home, explains why the structure is so important. 


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Fighting for Women, The CIA and WikiLeaks, An Escape From Auschwitz

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 08, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On International Women’s Day, The Takeaway looks back at the history of this global event and how it is marked differently around the world with Kavita Ramdas, a feminist activist and philanthropic adviser.
  • On Tuesday, Wikileaks a batch of documents that allegedly tie the CIA to software surveillance tools to access smartphones, computers, and internet-connected televisions. For details on this story we turn to Jake Williams, founder of Rendition Infosec, a threat intelligence firm based in Augusta, Georgia.
  • President Donald Trump's plan to replace the Affordable Care Act will place a greater burden on older Americans, who could see premiums rise by more than $3,000 a year. Max Richtman, president and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare and former staff director of the Senate Special Committee on Aging, explains. 
  • Rod Rosenstein went before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday as the president’s nominee for deputy attorney general. Because Attorney General Jeff Sessions has recused himself from the investigation into Russian meddling in the election, Rosenstein will oversee that investigation. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what you need to know. 

 



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Reshaping Obamacare, The War on Drugs, A Pioneering President

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Mar 07, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Republicans in the House of Representatives released the text of a bill Monday night that would remake the Affordable Care Act in the coming years. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details.
  • After an increase in diplomatic pressure, Iraq is now excluded from the group of countries included in the latest iteration of President Trump's travel ban. What is the Iraqi response to this decision, and what does it suggest about the future of the U.S.-Iraq relationship? For answers, we turn to Omar Al Nidawi, director for Iraq at Gryphon Partners, a strategic advisory firm.
  • An Ohio community is trying to fight the heroin epidemic by bringing misdemeanor charges against drug users who overdose and are revived by emergency responders using an antidote. Barry Bennett, a paramedic and the executive director of the Pickaway Area Recovery Services, has the details. 
  • The Department of Defense is investigating an undisclosed number of Marines who shared nude photos of female service members in a private Facebook group. Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a staff writer for The Washington Post and a former Marine infantryman, discusses the developing investigation, and the ongoing problems of sexual harassment within military ranks.
  • Nicholas Glisson was a cancer survivor who required a lot of special care. He was imprisoned after being convicted for transferring a two Oxycontin painkillers to a confidential informant, and he died after 37 days in prison. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor of The Marshall Project, and Alma Glisson, Nicholas' mother, share his story.


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A New Travel Ban, A Secret Cyberwar, Actor Danny Glover

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Mar 06, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Trump Administration issued a new, updated immigration ban via executive order today. Will this new executive order be able to stick, or will it face another legal challenge? For answers we turn to Faiza Patel, co-director of the Brennan Center's Liberty and National Security Program. Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear the full conversation. 
  • Over the weekend, The New York Times published a report detailing a “secret cyberwar” launched during the Obama Administration against North Korea. One of the authors of that report, David Sanger, national security correspondent for our partner the New York Times, shares the details of this story today on The Takeaway. Joel Wit, a senior fellow at the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, explains how much of a threat North Korea has become in the 21st century.
  • Activist and actor Danny Glover joined more than a thousand workers to march on Nissan’s factory in Canton, Mississippi this weekend. Protesters say the factory harasses and intimidates its predominantly black workforce, who have been denied the right to vote for a union. Glover discusses the protests today on The Takeaway. 
  • 2017 has already been a deadly year for transgender people across America, and states have varying laws when it comes to protections for gender identity in hate crimes. Emily Waters, senior manager of National Research and Policy at the Anti Violence Project, weighs in.
  • As deportations begin to rise under President Trump, churches and cities are declaring themselves sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants. It’s the latest chapter of a movement with a long history. Scott Michels, a producer for the Retro Report documentary team, examines the history of the nationwide sanctuary movement. 
  • Three weeks after his release from prison, former inmate Aaron Glosscock discusses what it's like to adjust to life in a world where he should have more freedom, but he is greatly constrained in what he can and cannot do.
  • Anna Sale, host of the podcast Death, Sex & Money, talks with her high school prom date, Ammar Ahmed, a Muslim-American whose lifestyle and values she says she never understood in her white, rural, West Virginia town.


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World on Edge: Russia, The U.S. and History’s Greatest Geopolitical Chess Match

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 03, 2017


Is the world seeing the dawn of a new Cold War between the United States and Russia? As questions continue to swirl about the Kremlin’s involvement in the 2016 presidential election, a familiar pattern seems to be emerging. In this special episode, we explore how the nation of about 143 million has changed since the Russian Revolution of 1917, and how the history between the U.S. and Russia is influencing the geopolitical landscape today.  Here’s what you’ll find in this special episode:

  • A giant chunk of 20th century history has come crashing into the chaotic first weeks of the Trump Administration. David Foglesong, a history professor at Rutgers University and author of "The American Mission and the Evil Empire,” says that in order to understand the current news cycle, you have to go back to 1903.
  • Graphic novelist Victoria Lomasko, the author of “Other Russias,” has spent nearly a decade documenting and drawing the lives of ordinary Russians throughout the country. The stories she tells from regular people offers a sharp contrast to the messages being put out of the Kremlin all over the vast land of Mother Russia.
  • On Capitol Hill, the latest chapter in our relationship with Russia is being written by the hour. On Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from any investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election after revelations surfaced that he met twice last year with Russia's U.S. ambassador. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us the latest.
  • 100 years after the Russian Revolution, what is the modern political scene like in Russia today? Keith Gessen is founding editor of the literature, culture, and politics journal n+1, and a professor at the Columbia Journalism School. Gessen says the Kremlinology of the past has been replaced with what he has coined Putinology — the study of America’s favorite Russian bad guy.
  • Mikhail Zygar, a Russian journalist who started the country’s first independent TV station, is now working on the project, “1917: Free History,” which chronicles the letters, memoirs, and diaries of the Russian Revolution. His project is intended to remind Russians that they may be freer than they think.


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Russia and Jeff Sessions, Reimagining Immigration, A Pioneering Advocate

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 02, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reportedly met with an official from Russia twice during the 2016 election, "at the height of what U.S. intelligence officials say was a Russian cyber campaign to upend the U.S. presidential race," according to a new report from The Washington Post. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details.
  • Repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act was a key tenant of President Trump's campaign from the start. But two months into their control of Congress, Republicans can't seem to agree on a concrete way forward. Mary Agnes Carey, partnerships editor and senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, walks us through the nuts and bolts of the specific GOP healthcare proposals that are on the table.
  • The new documentary “American Veteran” tells the story of Sergeant Nick Mendes, who was paralyzed from the neck down by an IED in Afghanistan and Wendy Eichler, the medical caregiver he met in a V.A. hospital and fell in love with. Julie Cohen, director of "American Veteran," weighs in. 
  • On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump called for a “merit-based system” that Democrats and Republicans could work together on. Stephen W. Yale-Loehr teaches immigration law at Cornell University and Melissa Babel, a certified immigration law specialist with the Law Society of Upper Canada and senior manager at KPMG Law in Toronto, Canada, discuss the president's plan. 
  • In part IV of our series "Commuted: Life After Prison," The Takeaway follows former inmate Aaron Glasscock as he says goodbye to his family and friends and arrives at a court-mandated halfway house operated by Dismas Charities. We also hear from Raymond Weiss, president and CEO Dismas Charities, and Jan Kempf, executive vice president and COO of the organization.
  • The new mini-series "When We Rise" will air on ABC and chronicle the real-life personal and political struggles, set-backs, and triumphs of a group of LGBT men and women who helped pioneer one of the last legs of the U.S. civil rights movement. Part III of this series features the story of LGBT advocate Richard Socarides and his role in the Clinton White House. The Takeaway hears from Charles Socarides, an actor and brother of Richard Socarides, and Richard Socarides himself. 


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Trump Looks for a Reset, An Emotional Release, The Music of Resistance

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 01, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • In a prime time address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night, President Donald Trump laid out this policy priorities and called on the House and Senate to work together. Today The Takeaway hears from three voters — a Republican who voted for Trump, a Democrat who voted for Trump, and a Republican who didn't vote for Trump — to find out what they thought of the president's address. Shirl St. Germain is a former restaurant owner in Marco Island, Florida, Kenneth Lanci is founder of Consolidated Solutions a business in Cleveland, and Hal Scoggins is an attorney from Portland, Oregon. 
  • On Monday, bomb threats were called into Jewish schools and community centers in Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia, in what is the fifth wave of threats in the past two months. David Shtulman, director of the Jewish Federation of Greater Ann Arbor, weighs in on the attacks. 
  • Every 20 years, Florida amends its constitution through the Constitution Revision Commission — the only state with such a body. The members of the 2017-18 Constitution Revision Commission are being named this month. For details on this process and how the state's Constitution may change, we turn to Sandy D'Alemberte, president emeritus of Florida State University and a former state legislator who chaired the Constitution Revision Commission in 1977-78.
  • Today, the Texas Supreme Court hears oral arguments in a Houston case challenging the city’s benefit policy for same-sex couples, despite the fact that the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on same sex marriage in 2015. Evan Wolfson, founder and president of Freedom To Marry, discusses the case. 
  • In part III of our series, "Commuted: Life After Prison," we meet Aaron Glasscock for the first time as a free man. As Aaron is set free, he quickly learns that life outside looks much different than he remembered it. He’s both worried and optimistic about the future, hoping that the skills he gained in prison will be enough to get him a job. He’s also set rules for himself to help set his life on a positive course. 
  • Indian-American and Muslim musician Zeshan Bagewadi discusses his cover of George Perkins' civil rights-era song "Cryin' in the Streets." Perkins originally wrote the song in 1970 as a reaction to the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968.


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The Promise of Jobs, A Taste of Freedom, 'Muthaland'

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Feb 28, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • As part of his budget plan, President Trump is seeking a $54 billion increase in defense spending, with cuts of equal proportion to domestic spending. Dakota Wood, who served in U.S. Marine Corps for two decades and is now a senior research fellow for defense programs at The Heritage Foundation, explores how this boost in spending could affect the military and how we wage war.
  • The Trump Administration pledges to bring 25 million jobs to America over the next decade, but can the president deliver? For answers, we turn to Robert Reich, secretary of labor under President Clinton from 1993 to 1997. He also served in the administrations of Presidents Ford and Carter, and is currently a professor of public policy at the University of California.

  • Daycare centers on military bases are already understaffed and have long waiting lists, and President Trump's hiring freeze is making families scramble to find childcare. Amy Bushatz, a reporter for Military.com and a military spouse, explains. 
  • Hundreds of former employees of Sterling Jewelers — which operates Jared and Kay Jewelers — claim they were sexually harassed (groped, pressured into sex acts, and more), lost jobs for refusing advances, and were subjected to widespread gender discrimination, according to a new report in The Washington Post. Drew Harwell, the reporter behind this new piece, weighs in. 
  • In part II of our new series, "Commuted: Life After Prison," The Takeaway travels with the family of Aaron Glasscock to Manchester Federal Correctional Institution in Kentucky — the place that Aaron's family will meet him for the first time as a free man. We hear from Aaron's mom, Pigeon Deep, his sister Jeanie Yokum, and Eddie Lanham, a close family friend.
  • Indian-American actor and performer Minita Gandhi joins The Takeaway to discuss her one-woman show, "Muthaland," which tells the story of a young woman whose life is forever changed on a trip to India after she unearths family secrets, encounters a prophet, and ultimately discovers her voice within a culture of silence.


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Deadly Xenophobia, An NBA Revolt Against Trump, Life After Prison

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Feb 27, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • After the most contentious election for Democratic National Committee chair in decades, members narrowly picked former Labor Secretary and establishment favorite Tom Perez. Perez, who is the first Latino to lead the Democratic Party, joined the race in December to oppose Representative Keith Ellison, a member of the Bernie wing of the party. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details. 
  • There's been much scrutiny over the ideology of Steve Bannon, the former head of Breitbart News who's now President Trump's chief strategist. But Bannon is not the only figure in Trump's White House who represents a new breed of conservative thought. Michael Anton, a former George W. Bush–era speechwriter and private-equity executive, is now playing a handful of different roles in the Trump Administration. Tina Nguyen, staff reporter for Vanity Fair, explains what you need to know.
  • Last week an evening at the Austin Bar & Grill in Olathe, Kansas quickly turned to tragedy when a gunman entered the establishment and reportedly yelled “get out of my country” before he shot two immigrants from India. Tapash Chakraborty, an Indian-American resident of Kansas for over 20 years, and his daughter, Jinia Chakraborty, a second generation Indian-American, discuss this shooting's impact on the local community and what it means to be an immigrant in America today.
  • Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation magazine and host of "The Edge of Sports" podcast, explains why many NBA players and teams are revolting against President Donald Trump, and how the league’s commissioner is handling the players’ right to speak out.
  • The 89th Academy Awards took place on Sunday night. Though the awards ceremony was celebrated for being the most diverse in decades, controversy and chaos broke out when the wrong film was announced in the "Best Picture" category. Rafer Guzman, film critic for The Takeaway and Newsday, has the details. 
  • American author Jodi Picoult joins The Takeaway to read an essay that confronts her own understanding of race and racism as a privileged white woman in America. The complicated emotions and feelings of trying to write about race played an important role in her latest novel, "Small Great Things."
  • The Obama Administration issued more commutations than any other U.S. president on record. In a new series, "Commuted: Life After Prison," The Takeaway follows an inmate, Aaron Glasscock, and his family as he is released after 18 years in prison and begins the transition into society. Today we hear from Aaron's mother, Agnes Deep.


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A New Democratic Leader, Pruitt's Carbon Love Affair, Revolutionary Films

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Feb 24, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The decision over who will lead the Democratic National Committee (DNC) is perhaps the most important question for whether the party can recover from its loss in 2016, and the bitter split that the primary contest forged. Howard Dean, chairman of the DNC from 2005 to 2009, a six term governor of Vermont, and former presidential candidate, looks ahead to what's next for the Democratic Party. 
  • Following Scott Pruitt’s confirmation as head of the EPA, thousands of emails have been released documenting the former Oklahoma attorney general’s ties to fossil fuel industry. Lisa Graves, director of the Center for Media and Democracy, explains. 
  • The worst appears to be over for rain-drenched San Jose, but residents are dealing with severe flood damage and are expecting more storms over the weekend. We look at the impact of California's wettest winter in 20 years with Julia Sulek, reporter for the San Jose Mercury News.
  • The 89th Annual Academy Awards will be held this coming Sunday evening. Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, reviews the Oscars nominees for Best Original Song.
  • This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of "The Graduate," "Bonnie and Clyde," "In the Heat of the Night," "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," and "Doctor Dolittle," all of which were nominated for Best Picture. Mark Harris documented the production histories of all five films in his book "Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood," and sees this group of films as evidence of a transitional period in Hollywood with themes that tie to 2017.


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Transgender Rights, China Worries, Understanding the Cosmos

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Feb 23, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Wednesday, the Trump Administration announced that it in plans to overturn an Obama-era protection that allows transgender students to use the bathroom of their choosing in schools. Here to discuss the policy shift is Jillian T. Weiss, executive director of the Transgender Legal Defense and Education Fund, and Donna Milo, a Republican business owner and transgender woman.
  • Protest camps around the Dakota Access Pipeline are expected to be shut down by the Army Corps of Engineers today. For a look at where the movement goes next and for an analysis of other grassroots protests, The Takeaway turns to Jay Caspian Kang, a correspondent for Vice News Tonight, and writer-at-large for the New York Times Magazine.
  • A new study that collected data from people in 47 states over the course of 17 years reveals that teens are less likely to attempt suicide in places where gay and lesbian couples have the right to marry one another. Julia Raifman, postdoctoral fellow in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Epidemiology and co-author of the study, explains.
  • If President Trump does end up pursuing a very aggressive trade policy with China, and the Chinese government retaliates and targets Chinese students, many U.S. colleges could potentially lose billions of dollars in tuition revenue, according to Kirk Carapezza, managing editor of our partner WGBH’s higher education desk.
  • Scientists have announced two major discoveries this week that have the potential to drastically alter some of their previous held understandings of the cosmos. Jason Kendall, adjunct professor of astronomy at William Paterson University, joins The Takeaway to explain the significance of these developments. 
  • Joe Feingold, a 93-year-old Holocaust survivor, donated his violin to Brianna, a 13-year-old schoolgirl from the Bronx. Their story is told in the Oscar-nominated documentary, "Joe's Violin." Today, the Takeaway hears from Graham Parker and Kahane Cooperman, directors of the film. 


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Tension Among Neighbors, Fighting Anti-Semitism, Desperation at Sea

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Feb 22, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Department of Homeland Security released documents yesterday that translate President Trump's immigration orders into practice for the nation's immigration enforcers. Camille Mackler, director of legal initiatives for the New York Immigration Coalition, Jong-Min You, a Korean-born undocumented immigrant who has lived in the U.S. his whole life, and DACA recipient Andrea Bonilla, discuss the Trump Administration's rules could mean for immigrants nationwide. 

  • More and more hate groups are springing up across the United States, and Jewish communities have seen increasing waves of vandalism and bomb threats. Following the lead of his daughter, President Trump finally acknowledged this violence on Tuesday. Rabbi Jonah Pesner, director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, discusses the recent uptick in anti-Semitic threats and the president's response. 
  • Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly will meet with Mexican President Enrique Pe?a Nieto during a two day visit to Mexico this week, after a fraught first month for the new administration and Mexico. Jorge Guajardo, Mexican ambassador to China from 2007-2013 and consul general to Mexico in Austin, Texas from 2005 to 2007, explains what we can expect from this meeting. 
  • The bodies of 74 migrants washed ashore in Libya on Monday. In recent months, the route across the Mediterranean has proven to be increasingly dangerous, and as spring rapidly approaches, officials fear that more and more migrants will attempt to make the often deadly trip. Mary Fitzgerald, a journalist specializing in Libya and a contributing author to the book "The Libyan Revolution and its Aftermath," analyzes the politics surrounding the migrant crisis, and reflects on the dangerous journey for those crossing the Mediterranean.


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Angry Town Hall Meetings, Sex Offender Rights, Seeking Out the KKK

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Feb 21, 2017


Coming up on today’s show:

  • On Monday, President Donald Trump appointed Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as national security advisor. McMaster is a West Point graduate who earned a Silver Star during the 1991 Gulf War, and is well regarded for his innovative military strategies. George Packer, a staff writer at The New Yorker who first wrote about McMaster in 2006, weighs in on McMaster’s appointment.
  • Iraqi led forces launched an offensive charge against ISIS to retake the western part of Mosul on Sunday. In light of the recent efforts from the Iraqi Army, U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis made an unannounced visit to Baghdad on Monday. Emma Graham-Harrison, an international affairs correspondent for The Guardian, joins The Takeaway to discuss the latest efforts by Iraqi forces and what Mattis' visit to Iraq may signify.
  • The Presidents’ Day holiday weekend proved to be a difficult time for lawmakers who are wrestling over the repeal and replacement of Obamacare, among other issues. Here with an update on the latest is Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich.
  • In the early months of 2017, there’s been an unprecedented amount of activity on the state-level in regards to broadband access. Large telecommunications monopolies are digging their heels in on a number of issues and, in some places, citizens are fighting back. Here to explain is Christopher Mitchell, director of Community Broadband Networks at the Institute for Local Self Reliance.
  • Back in 2010, a 15-year-old Mexican citizen was shot across the U.S.-Mexico border by a border patrol agent. Is he protected by the Constitution? It’s a question The Supreme Court will hear in the case Hernandez Vs. Mesa. Margaret Hu, associate professor of law at Washington and Lee University, discusses the case and what the ruling would mean for the future.
  • The latest installment of our Case in Point series explores a legal case about the rights of registered sex offenders that has gone all the way to the Supreme Court. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, and Glenn Gerding, North Carolina Appellate Defender, discuss the case.
  • Daryl Davis, a musician, speaker, and author, discusses his experience as a black man seeking out members of the KKK and other race-oriented hate groups to challenge their prejudices. His story is told in the new documentary, "Accidental Courtesy."


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Executive Angst: Understanding America’s Presidential Power Struggle

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Sat, Feb 18, 2017


Today, we're dedicating our entire show to thinking deeply about the role of the president and executive power.  Here’s what you’ll find in this special Presidents’ Day episode:

  • From George Washington and Andrew Jackson, to Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, the function of the highest office in the land has expanded and contracted over time — sometimes beyond what the nation’s founders ever intended. Where did the concept of executive power originate, and what does the Constitution actually say about it? For answers, we turn to Eric Posner, a professor of law at the University of Chicago.
  • President Donald Trump could certainly be compared with other presidents when it comes to his outlook on executive authority. But that doesn't reassure John Yoo. He's a law professor at the University of California at Berkeley, and former Justice Department official under President George W. Bush. He has supported past exertions of presidential power for matters relating to torture, surveillance and drones. And yet, he has serious reservations about President Trump.
  • The judiciary provides a key check on the president's powerful hand. But in recent weeks, we've seen the Trump Administration take on the court system, and what has traditionally been a healthy tug-of-war is suddenly starting to look more like an out-right war between the executive and judicial branches. Leon Fresco, former deputy assistant attorney general at the Justice Department and former head of the the Office of Immigration Litigation under the Obama Administration, says over time, the judiciary has become defensive of its powers — and with good reason.
  • Many voices on Capitol Hill say that Congress has ceded too much authority to the president. U.S. Senator Mike Lee of Utah is one of the lawmakers behind the "Article One Project,” an initiative based on the idea that Congress was always meant to be the driving force in federal policymaking. He discusses the plan with Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich.
  • If you could redesign our democracy, knowing what we know today about our world, how would you do it? Pippa Norris, a lecturer in comparative politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, spends a lot of time thinking about how democracies function, how power is balanced, and the role of elections and public opinion in the shaping of our government. Today on The Takeaway she imagines the future of the U.S. system of government.

 



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Intel Unease, Movie Music, When Darwin Reached America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Feb 17, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The intelligence community appears to be at war with President Trump amid leaks over Russian involvement during the 2016 election. Mark Lowenthal, former assistant director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production under President Bush, and current president of the Intelligence and Security Academy, explains. 
  • PRI and The Takeaway have been sending your pressing questions to President Trump using his favorite method of communication — Twitter — in a project we're calling "100 Questions in 100 Days." With no response, we turn to Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich to answer some of the biggest questions of the week.
  • President Trump is in Charleston, South Carolina, today to attend the rollout of a new plane from Boeing. On Wednesday, Boeing's South Carolina workers overwhelmingly rejected a move to unionize by a vote of 3 to 1. Jeff Hirsch, a law professor at UNC-Chapel Hill who specializes in labor relations, joins The Takeaway to discuss how bad perceptions and big campaigns shaped the vote, and what it means for the future of unions under Trump. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new big-budget action movie "The Great Wall," which stars actors Matt Damon, Tian Jing, and Willem Dafoe.
  • The 89th Academy Awards will take place on February 26th. Though there is a sea of strong contenders, Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker argues that a musical is bound to win Best Original Score at the 2017 Oscars. 
  • People with student loans should be wary of scams that promise debt forgiveness. Betsy Mayotte, the director of consumer outreach and compliance at American Student Assistance, says these kinds of programs are everywhere, and explains how to spot them. 


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The View from Moscow, Puzder's Done, Fake Voting Fraud

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Feb 16, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Americans wake up every day to a new crop of political developments that range from odd to alarming. Many are about Russia being involved in some part of American life where it hadn't been recently. But how does this all look in Russia? Charles Maynes, an independent journalist in Moscow, answers
  • Fast food magnate Andrew Puzder officially withdrew from his nomination to be labor secretary under President Donald Trump, amid concerns that he wouldn't make it through confirmation because he had hired a nanny who lacked permission to work in the U.S. He also had been accused of domestic abuse by his ex wife, and wage theft and mistreatment by workers at his Carl's Jr. restaurants. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the latest. 
  • The immigration ban has raised broader questions about how far officials at the border can go while searching private property, including phones and social media. Rights are not always completely clear at the border and agents often have a good amount of leeway in denying or permitting entry. Rey Koslowski of the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs explains.
  • President Trump and his policy director Stephen Miller have both claimed that voters were bused into New Hampshire from Massachusetts, swinging the election there to Hillary Clinton. Former New Hampshire Attorney General Tom Rath, a longtime Republican political consultant, is one of many in the Granite State saying that just simply isn't true.
  • The rapidly changing U.S.-Russia relationship is having effects in many former Soviet-bloc countries, often because they see the U.S. as an influence to help protect basic human rights. Two former Uzbek political prisoners, Umida Niyazova and Sanjar Umarov, are hoping the U.S. can keep pressure on one of the most repressive regimes in the world. 
  • Seventy years after they were recorded, two songs sung by Holocaust survivors have been unearthed at the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology at the University of Akron. David Baker, the center's executive director, has been on a mission to unlock the recordings done on wire spools shortly after the end of the war.

 



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Trump Ties to Russia; Kushner and Netanyahu; A Very Good Dog

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Feb 15, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • More details are emerging around the dismissal of national security adviser Michael Flynn and his ties to Russia, but late last night we learned that members of Trump's campaign staff were often in contact with senior Russian intelligence officials. Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich will have more. 
  • The Kushner family has a relationship with Benjamin Netanyahu that goes back decades. Now Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law, is the White House's leading adviseron on Middle East affairs as President Trump is set to meet with the Israeli Prime Minister today. Ambassador Dennis Ross, a former Middle East peace negotiator and adviser to both Democratic and Republican presidential administrations, joins us.
  • In the same week that Israeli president Benjamin Netanyahu visits President Donald Trump at the White House, a delegation of 11 current and former NFL players was supposed to take a trip to Israel. Four of the players bailed on the trip, which appeared designed to make them look as if they supported settlement policy, after Dave Zirin of The Nation penned an open letter to players that was signed by Angela Davis, John Carlos and others.
  • Only one can be Best In Show, but they're all good dogs at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Sarah Montague, cohost of the Dog Story podcast and resident pup expert joined us to talk about the 141st version of the annual dog show that concluded last night. 
  • Since 2010, increasingly conservative state legislatures have been passing laws designed to make abortion harder to access, despite Roe v. Wade. Last year, 60 bills were passed, and Elizabeth Nash of the Guttmacher Institute explains why restrictions have been getting more extreme.
  • Filmmaker Garrett Bradley's 'Alone' is about the hole ripped in other lives when a loved one is behind bars. In this short, Alon? Watts lives in New Orleans, where she has became a single mother and a woman in a relationship with someone in prison overnight.

 

 

 



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Flynn Out, Atrocities in Syria, Oroville Dam

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Feb 14, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Trump's National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigned late last night after reports that he had misled Vice President Mike Pence about his contacts with Russia. The Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us with the latest, including who might take over the job. 
  • Syrian government helicopters dropped chlorine on residential areas in Aleppo at least eight times from Nov. 17-Dec. 13, according to a report by Human Rights Watch that was published Monday. Ole Solvang, deputy director for emergencies at Human Rights Watch talked to us from Paris about his organization's report on chemical weapons use by President Bashar al-Assad's regime. His organization's report followed one from Amnesty International that up to 13,000 people were summarily hanged in secret from 2011-2015. Assad dismissed the report. Martin Chulov, who covers the Middle East for the Guardian joined us to discuss the current situation.
  • Net neutrality advocates are worried because FCC chairman Ajit Pai has unraveled several Obama administration polices in his first few weeks on the job. Also watching with trepidation has been commissioner Mignon Clyburn, who explained what these changes mean. 
  • Nearly 200,000 people have been ordered to evacuate from an area downstream of the tallest dam in the United States, and more rain is in the forecast. The dam's spillways have been eroded by the force of water rushing over it, but efforts are underway to shore them up. This is the scenario environmental groups were concerned about when they filed a lawsuit 12 years ago to try forcing regulators to strengthen the dam. Mark Ogden of the Association of State Dam Safety Officials is with us to explain. 
  • Attorneys for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl are seeking to get his court martial dismissed because a member of his chain of command has already proclaimed the soldier a traitor and a deserter and suggested he be executed. That commander is President Donald Trump, whose comments on the campaign trail were shown to a military judge, who called it "disturbing material." Rachel VanLandingham, a retired Air Force lawyer and current law professor at  Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles, joined us to discuss the implications.
  • When he was President, George Washington tried to get around laws prohibiting slavery in the North by sending his nine slaves south twice a year to "reset the clock" requiring them to be freed after six months. One time, one of them didn't come back. "Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge" tells her story, and author Erica Armstrong Dunbar is with us. 


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Flynn Under Scrutiny,  Ranchers on Trial, Hypernormal Reality

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Feb 13, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • National security adviser Michael Flynn faces scrutiny for allegations of contact with Russia's ambassador before President Trump took office. On Friday, the president said he would "look into" the claims, and if they prove true, Flynn's conduct may likely have been illegal. Ryan Goodman, editor in chief of Just Security and former special counsel to the Department of Defense, joins us.
  • In at least half a dozen states, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers made hundreds of arrests, sweeping up undocumented immigrants in a wide-ranging dragnet. Camille Mackler, Director of Legal Initiatives for the New York Immigration Coalition explains the implications of the raids.
  • Testimony begins today in the trial of half a dozen of the defendants involved in the armed standoff between Rancher Cliven Bundy and federal agents in 2014. Jenny Wilson of the Las Vegas Review Journal has been covering the case, and joins us to talk about the second trial involving the Bundy family and public land. His sons were acquitted in the occupation of a national wildlife refuge. 
  • Oregon rancher Keith Nantz has said he doesn't approve of the Bundy family's approach to the problem, but understands why they are upset. He explains the issues at stake for beef producers in the American West, why they need access to federal land, and why changing regulations lead to economic losses. 
  • The University of Connecticut women's basketball team is going for its 100th straight win tonight. ESPN columnist Mechelle Voepel is here to look ahead to the Huskies' game against No. 6 South Carolina, and to discuss what the milestone means for the world of sports. 
  • Seizing the property of suspects has long been considered a critical law-enforcement, too. But taking the possessions of people before they have been convicted of a crime -- innocent people, in other words -- has significant real-world consequences. Maurice Chammah of the Marshall Project joins us to discuss some of those, as well as the future of the policy.
  • Is massive, widespread self-delusion by society a response to the chaotic and unpredictable world? British filmmaker Adam Curtis argues it might be in his documentary "HyperNormalisation." In the film released just ahead of the 2016 election, Curtis attempts to show that, rather than respond to and accept a chaotic and unpredictable world, we delude ourselves into thinking that things are far simpler and more easily explainable than they actually are. 

 

 



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Travel Ban Rejected, Presidential Ethics, Getting By on Your Parents' Jobs

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Feb 10, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

The 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals rejected President Trump's ban on travel to the United States by people from seven largely Muslim countries. Leon Fresco, former head immigration lawyer in the Obama Justice Department, joins us to talk about the ruling.

We asked if your parents' livelihoods would be feasible for you, today, in 2017 America. Your responses gave us a look at the current state of the economy for working people.

Donald Trump tweeted his anger at the department-store chain Nordstrom this week, claiming they mistreated his daughter when they stopped selling her fashion line. His adviser Kellyanne Conway followed up on that by overtly telling people to buy her products in what seems like a clear violation of government ethics laws. Kathleen Clark, professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis, joined us to explain the week in ethics issues.

Japan prime minister Shinzo Abe is set to visit the United States for a summit with President Trump. But instead of coming to the White House, Abe will stay at Mar-A-Lago, Trump's private club and hotel in South Florida. Jim Schoff, a former senior adviser for East Asia policy in the Department of Defense, will talk to us about the nature of the United States-Japan relationship. 

Every Friday, Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, drops by to review the new releases hitting the box office. This week, he looks at "Fifty Shades Darker," sequel to the box-office hit "Fifty Shades of Grey," as well as "John Wick: Chapter 2" and "The LEGO Batman Movie." 

Translating a president's words to another language is always a tricky affair. President Donald Trump's syntax and word choices present some of their own challenges. David Bellos, director of the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication at Princeton University, goes over some of the unique issues translators face. 

The Canadian province of Manitoba, which shares borders with North Dakota and Minnesota, has become a hotspot destination for an increasing number of asylum seekers fleeing from the United States to cross the border by foot. Many risk their lives at this time of year so they can appeal for asylum in Canada, rather than the US. 



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Refugee Organizations Stressed, ACA Replacement Proposals, Fate of the Obama Movement after '08

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Feb 09, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Organizations that help refugees have been scrambling since President Trump's travel ban was implemented nearly two weeks ago. David Miliband of the International Rescue Committee talks with us about some of the implications of the ban for refugees, organizations, and the West's reputation. 
  • After promising before the election that they would repeal the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare, with great haste, Republicans have backed off that timeline. Now they're proposing a multitude of replacement plans -- or are they "repair" plans? WNYC Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich helps us sort them all out. 
  • Could you, in 2017, make a living at the same work your parents did a generation ago? We asked listeners to tell us, and your answers reveal an America in which many jobs simply no longer exist as a viable route to financial stability and security. 
  • People protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline have been closing their accounts at banks doing business with the project. Now, the City of Seattle has decided to do the same. In a unanimous vote earlier this week, the city council agreed it will cut ties with Wells Fargo. We spoke with council member Kshama Sawant about what that means for Seattle as well as other cities and states who could make similar decisions. 
  • New CIA chief Mike Pompeo is in Turkey to meet with officials there on a trip that apparently was not meant to be publicized. BuzzFeed Middle East correspondent Borzou Daragahi speaks with us about the trip and what it means for Turkey-US relations, especially as they pertain to fighting ISIS.
  • In the recent presidential election, many young working-class people, especially white ones, revealed a distrust of a US economic system that often leaves them out. Some people were surprised, but Jennifer Silva, an assistant professor of sociology at Bucknell, wrote about this phenomenon years ago. She joins us to talk about the ways in which institutions are failing Americans, especially those without excess family resources to rely on. 
  • Around the same time that Silva was conducting her field research, presidential candidate Barack Obama was tapping into an extraordinary amount of energy, especially from young Americans. He built a movement and a volunteer network that was essentially without precedent. After the election, that movement was going to continue to change the world. Until it didn't. Author Micah Sifry joins us to explain how all of that was squandered. 

 



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Yemen Bans Raids, Media Coverage of Terrorism, Warren Silenced in the Senate

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Feb 08, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Following a botched by US forces there, Yemen has suspended ground operations by US special operations forces. The Jan. 29 raid, which the Trump administration called a success, resulted in the death of one Navy SEAL operator as well as many civilians, including children. Eric Schmitt of The New York Times joins us to discuss the latest. 
  • The media actually does fail to cover dozens of terrorist attacks -- the ones that happen in the Muslim world. Karen Greenberg, the director of Fordham Law School's Center on National Security joins us to discuss why these attacks receive less attention than ones in the Western world.
  • Betsy DeVos steps into the job as Secretary of Education with public school enrollment at an all time high, over 50 million kids. But DeVos is a strong advocate for charter schools, which enroll a twentieth as many students. Liz Willen, editor of The Hechinger Report, says there are some misconceptions to clear up in order to understand the future of education under the Trump administration. 
  • During debate on the nomination of Jeff Sessions for Attorney General, Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell forced Elizabeth Warren to stop reading a 1986 letter to the Senate from Coretta Scott King. He invoked a little-used rule forbidding Senators from impugning a fellow member of the body. Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich explains.
  • Tech policy reporter Cecilia Kang of The New York Times explains some of the coming changes from the FCC. Chairman Ajit Pai has already released a dozen actions to dismantle consumer protection rules, and has shunned the idea that the internet is a public utility. 
  • Pai has said that one of his main goals since being elevated to chairman by president Donald Trump is to close the digital divide. But last week, he blocked nine companies from proving internet service to low-income families under the Lifeline communications program. Nicol Turner-Lee of the Brookings Institution joins us to explain the history of the program as well as the implications of the FCC's latest decision. 
  • Novelist Robert Coover picks up where Mark Twain left off, bringing Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer out to "the territory" during the Civil War in his new work "Huck Out West." He joins us to explain why this time period, from the start of the Civil War to the Black Hills Gold Rush, is what made America what it is today.

 



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Travel Ban Questions Answered, Protests in Romania, The History of Today's Divide

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Feb 07, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Obama administration's top immigration lawyer, Leon Fresco, answers listener questions about the current status of the Trump administration's travel ban. The case is now in the hands of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals, where a three-judge panel will decide whether to restore the ban that had been temporarily halted by a lower federal court. 
  • Daniella Levine Cava, one of the commissioners of Miami-Dade County, joints us to discuss the implications of the decision by mayor Carlos Gimenez to cooperate with the Trump administration's executive order directing cities and counties to detain people based on immigration status, a federal concern. Not everyone in the combined city-county government thinks that move was necessary.
  •  A man exonerated after spending 27 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit got out of prison and was sent to an immigration detention facility. Now Jules Letemps faces deportation to Haiti, a country he fled in 1981, because of a minor drug offense in his past. Reporter Christie Thompson of The Marshall Project discusses his case.
  • Betsy DeVos faces strong opposition in the Senate to her nomination as Education Secretary, and Vice President Mike Pence is expected to be needed to break a tie to confirm her. The Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the latest from the Senate.  
  • In the first weeks of his presidency, Donald Trump has mostly focused on policies concerning Europe and the Middle East. Notably absent from the list has been China. Orville Schell, director of the Asia Society's Center on US-China relations, assesses the state of US-China relations. 
  • Author Nicholas Guyatt has a new way of looking at how the history of segregation informs current divisions in American society, including analogies that can be drawn from the very first attempt to solve America's racial problems. 


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Dismantling Dodd Frank, Violence in Ukraine, The Increasing Reach of the FBI

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Feb 06, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • In an executive order announced Friday, President Trump has begun the process of dismantling the Dodd Frank Act which regulates bank lending. It’s one of many rollbacks on the Obama administration’s financial regulations that is expected to be announced today.  Barney Frank, former member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Massachusetts from 1981 to 2013, was one of the law's main sponsors.
  • President Trump promised to take steps to remove himself from his business, but there continues to be no record of him doing so. Susanne Craig, reporter for The New York Times, discusses Trump's potential conflicts of interest.

  • An increase in shelling in Russian-occupied Eastern Ukraine puts pressure on Donald Trump to rethink his amiable approach to Russia. Christopher Miller, Kyiv-based correspondent for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, reports from the scene. 
  • In a new era marked by vehement resistance and protest, an investigation by The Intercept reveals the FBI's unprecedented spying powers and provides a vital glimpse into how the agency holds itself accountable to its byzantine rules and regulations.


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The Growing Left, Australia's Refugees, Florida Death Row

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Feb 03, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • At a critical moment for Democrats, what can they learn from the coordination and success the Tea Party movement had in obstructing the early part of Obama's presidency? The Takeaway speaks with Matt Kibbe, a Tea Party organizer, about how the Democrats can learn from how the Republican Party handled his movement. 
  • There are groups on the Left that might one day rival the Tea Party's energy, like the the Democratic Socialists of America, or the DSA, the members of which have tripled in about six months. Takeaway producer Oliver Lazarus attends a DSA meeting in Brooklyn.
  • Florida has executed 91 people since capital punishment was reintroduced in the United States 40 years ago, but executions were halted by the Supreme Court last January. WLRN reporter Wilson Sayre in Miami has made an audio documentary about where that has left prisoners sentenced to die by the state. 
  • We look past President Trump's anger at having to abide by a deal to accept 1,250 refugees being held by Australia to examine the conditions in which humans are being held. Kate Schuetze of Amnesty International joins us to discuss Australia's offshore detention centers in the island nation of Nauru, which human rights officials have called "cruel, inhuman and degrading."
  • Rafer Guzman joins us to talk about the weekend's movie releases, including "The Comedian," "The Space Between Us" and "The Salesman." The last film is directed by Asghar Farhadi, who is up for an Academy Award but unable to travel to the U.S. due to President Trump's immigration order banning nationals of seven countries, including Farhadi's Iran.
  • Behind the characters and unforgettable, fluorescent, candy-colored '90s look of "Saved By The Bell" was executive producer Peter Engel. The producer of other Saturday morning teen shows, as well as "Last Comic Standing" joins us to discuss his memoir about a life in television.   

 



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Israeli Settlements, Adjusting to the Immigration Ban, 'Normal' in Trump's America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Feb 02, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Last week, the Israeli parliament approved the construction of  2,500 new homes in the West Bank and over 500 in East Jerusalem. Yesterday, 3,000 more homes were authorized by the government - a growth in settlements emboldened by President Trump's strong backing of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. While tensions surrounding the settlements have risen dramatically in recent years, their development dates back to 1967. Filmmaker Shimon Dotan traces that history in his documentary "The Settlers," in which he examines how a small number of initial settlements permitted by Israeli officials paved the way for roughly 400,000 settlers living in the West Bank today. Dotan discusses a situation that he believes is on the verge of becoming catastrophic.
  • Sana Mustafa is a 25-year old Syrian refugee, having been forced to seek asylum after her father was detained by the Assad regime. She arrived in the U.S. in 2013, eventually earning a scholarship to Bard College. The rest of her family has been attempting to resettle here, as well. But with the Trump administration's immigration orders, that reunion is now on unstable ground. 
  • Defense Secretary James Mattis landed in Seoul today to meet with South Korean and Japanese officials, his first overseas trip. The focus will be on U.S.-Asia alliances, a relationship Mattis stressed during his confirmation hearings. Bonnie Glaser, senior advisor for Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, discusses the significance of Secretary Mattis’s visit and what’s at stake for U.S.-Asia relations.

  • While the dramatized Supreme Court nominations, executive order signings, and cabinet hearings attract the headlines, Republican leaders are quietly rolling back a number of Obama regulations, using a little-known law called the Congressional Review ActTodd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, discusses what regulations will be the first to go. 

  • This past Monday, more than 1,700 Flint, Michigan, residents filed a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency. The plaintiffs are seeking over $770 million in damages and are attempting to gain class action status for their claims. According to the EPA, the lead levels in Flint's water have receded to the point that they are below the levels considered dangerous to drink. However, residents remain skeptical. Jan Burgess, lead plaintiff of the case, and Julie Hurwitz, civil rights attorney, discuss the case, and how it could set a precedent for other towns dealing with similar crises. 
  • A conversation on Wednesday's program ignited a discussion about what "normal" means in America today. Norm Crider, a marine corps veteran and supporter of the Trump policy on immigration and refugees, referenced "the normal culture of America." Many listeners reacted strongly, but the reality is that many people in America feel the same way that Mr. Crider does. Hussein Rashid, professor of religion at Hofstra University and a Truman National Security Fellow, and Jerusha Lamptey, professor at Union Theological Seminary and author of the book "Never Wholly Other," discuss that sentiment, and how Muslim immigrants meet and adjust to certain expectations of "normalcy" in America. 



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02/01/17: Neil Gorsuch is SCOTUS Nominee, A Non-Veteran Leads the VA, Transgender Boy Scouts

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Feb 01, 2017


On today's show:

  • Donald Trump nominates Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court of the United States. Gorsuch, the youngest nominee in a quarter century, is a great admirer of the late Antonin Scalia and shares his legal philosophy. Eric Citron, a partner at Goldstein & Russell and a former clerk to justices O'Connor and Kagan, gives legal analysis on the nomination.
  • Despite the widespread criticism of Trump's immigration ban among politicians and protesters, polls indicate that a majority of Americans support the measure. Norm Crider is one of them. He is a Marine Corps veteran, a Trump supporter and in favor of the ban. He explains why in this segment.
  • Dr. David Shulkin is favored to become the next Secretary of Veteran Affairs. If confirmed, he will be the first Obama holdover in the Trump White House and the first non-veteran to lead the VA. Bobbie O'Brien, a reporter/producer covering veterans and military affairs for WUSF, talks about the unique challenges he will face. 
  • As part of the #100Days100Qs series with our partner PRI, listeners are tweeting us their suggested questions and we're asking the president. Donald Trump hasn't answered yet but Todd Zwillich joins to tell us what he might say.
  • The Boy Scouts of America have faced heavy criticism in recent years for what civil rights advocates says is a lack of inclusiveness. In 2013 they opened their doors to gay scouts for the first time and in 2015 they began to allow gay scout leaders. On Monday, the Boy Scouts took it one step further announcing that transgender boy scouts are now welcome in their ranks. Scott Leadingham, a journalist and editor at Quill Magazine at the Society of Professional Journalists and a longtime Eagle Scout is joined by Kristie Maldonado, a New Jersey mother who filed a complaint on behalf of her 8-year-old son Joe Maldonado.
  • Author Paul Beatty imagined a world where segregation is reintroduced into society. Today, that vision doesn't seem quite as far off as when he published "The Sellout" in 2015. The book became the first by an American author to receive the U.K. Man Booker Prize.


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01/31/17: Immigration Ban: The Republican Response, the Christian Response, and the Complexities of Digital Security

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 31, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • 60 Republican lawmakers have expressed reservations or declined to fully support Trump's immigration ban. One of them is Congressman Leonard Lance from New Jersey's 7th district. He believes the order was rushed and poorly implemented.
  • The Pope family has been living off the land in Loyal, Oklahoma since 1902. Farm life has never been easy but in today’s world it’s even more difficult to make ends meet on a family owned farm, and for the Pope’s that means farming and ranching but also oil and gas.  The Takeaway traveled to the center of the country to take the nation's pulse.

  • Manoush Zomorodi, host of Note To Self, presents "The Privacy Paradox,” an audience engagement series that unpacks one of the greatest dilemmas we face in our wired-up world: how to stay connected without feeling intruded upon by our services and software.
  • Despite a measure in Trump's immigration ban that would prioritize Christian refugees, many Christian leaders are speaking out against the ban. Jennifer Smyers, Director of Policy and Advocacy for the Immigration and Refugee Program of the Church World Service shares that perspective.
  • Notable billionaire Warren Buffett eats McDonald's for breakfast. That's one of many facts revealed about "The Oracle of Omaha" in Peter Kunhardt's new documentary, "Becoming Warren Buffett." Susie Buffett talks about her father and the new documentary in this segment.

     



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01/30/17: Trump's Immigration Ban, Security Council Shakeup, NATO Reckons With Russia

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 30, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • President Trump's executive order banning Syrian refugees and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim nations sparked confusion and outrage this weekend, as travelers were left stranded at airports, protesters took to the streets and a federal judge ruling prompted the White House to roll back part of the order. Attorney and former immigration judge Eliza Klein examines the order and where it stands now.
  • In a restructuring of the National Security Council, Director of National Intelligence and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff will face diminished roles while Trump’s Chief Strategist Stephen Bannon will join the national security group. Matthew Waxman, co-chair of the Cybersecurity Center at the Columbia Data Science Institute explains what this means for security.

  • Six people are dead and eight wounded following a shooting at an Islamic center in Quebec City Sunday night, a day after Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomed refugees into his country "regardless of faith." Allan Woods, Quebec Bureau Chief for the Toronto Star, reports.
  • Congressional leaders are among those divided over President Trump's immigration ban, including Senators Lindsey Graham and John McCain. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich reports.
  • As Trump continues to pursue warming relations with Putin, NATO warns that elevating the Russian president to global superpower status could have negative consequences for the organization. Former deputy commander of NATO Sir Richard Shirreff explains.
  • Timothy Tyson chronicles the life and death of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old boy from Chicago, whose murder launched the civil rights movement. The new book, "The Blood of Emmett Till," comes out tomorrow.

     



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1/27/2017: Understanding Mike Pence, Hugh Hewitt on Trump, Weekend Movies

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Jan 27, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Today, Vice President Mike Pence will be attending the March for Life, becoming the highest ranking official to ever speak in person there. Maureen Groppe, a reporter for The Indianapolis Star's Washington bureau, interviewed Vice President Pence earlier this month. We speak with Groppe about Mike Pence's role as the face of conservative social values in the Trump White House, and the influence he can be expected to have within the administration.
  • Over the course of the presidential campaign, conservative talk radio host Hugh Hewitt spoke to President Trump more than a dozen times on his program. While he wasn't a Trump supporter from the start, he describes his personal evolution as one that left him "wearing Trump tattoos at the end of the campaign." Hewitt describes how Trump revitalized an unwitting Republican Party, and what it means for the future of the GOP. 

  • For decades, during times of injustice, unfairness, and power over people, millions have been called to protest - and to come up with songs that describe that experience. Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker does a deep dive on the genre, and recommends two new compilations of protest songs for the Trump administration. 

  • Every Friday, Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, drops by to review the new releases hitting the box office. This week, Rafer reviews the family-friendly dog movie "A Dog's Purpose"; "Gold," featuring Matthew McConaughey as a rogue prospector; and "Paterson", a film by Jim Jarmusch about a poetic bus driver in small-town America featuring Adam Driver and Golshifteh Farahani. 

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May will become the first world leader to meet with President Donald Trump today. Gisela Stuart, a Labour Member of Parliament who was a leading figure in the Vote Leave Brexit campaign in Britain, discusses the expectations for May's visit in the U.K., where many are wary of the Trump presidency. 

  • For forty years, North Carolina ran one of the largest and most aggressive sterilization programs in the United States. A new documentary out this weekend, "State of Eugenics," by Dawn Sinclair Shapiro explores North Carolina's efforts to find and recognize survivors of the state's eugenics program and the bipartisan partnership between two North Carolina lawmakers to get compensation for the victims.

    Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.


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01/26/17: Immigrants Under Trump, Tribal Power in Oklahoma, The Unspoken Trauma of Gun Violence

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Jan 26, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • President Donald Trump is continuing his focus on national security this week with an expected executive order today that blocks Syrian refugees indefinitely from entering the U.S., and significantly cuts down on the number of refugees allowed into the country. These policies are not abstract for many living in the United States. Trita Parsi, founder and president of the National Iranian American Council, and Mark Doss, supervising attorney at the International Refugee Assistance Project, share their stories and perspective.  
  • There are over 330,000 Native Americans in the state of Oklahoma, with 38 federally recognized tribes - the second largest Native American population in the country second to California. As some of the tribes are becoming more prosperous, they are beginning to assert their power in the state. Logan Layden, reporter with State Impact Oklahoma, discusses how tribes in the state are looking to finally have their voices and interests heard. Alfreda Doonkeen, a member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, describes some of the persistent problems faced by the tribes in the state. 

  • WLRN in Miami, Florida has compiled a 12-part series, "Young Survivors: The Unspoken Trauma of Gun Violence," highlighting the often hidden impacts of gun violence in the city. The mother of a 17-year-old shooting victim, Shanta Grant, recounts the evening her son walked out the door and the phone call no parent wants to get. Reporter Sammy Mack discusses how the effects of gun violence manifest in communities and families for generations. 

  • Mary Tyler Moore died on Wednesday at the age of 80. Kristen Meinzer, a senior producer for Panoply and former Takeaway producer and host of the Movie Date podcast at WNYC, traces Moore's career and life, and how she changed entertainment. 

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/25/17: Executive Actions on Immigration, Budget Woes in Oklahoma City

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Jan 25, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The latest news from Washington, D.C. with The Takeaway’s Todd Zwillich, who discusses President Donald Trump’s latest executive orders including his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and halt immigration from Muslim nations. 

  • Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett discusses his efforts to transform Oklahoma City and revitalize its downtown area. 
  • President Trump signed an executive order reopening the door for construction of the Dakota Access pipeline from North and South Dakota to Illinois, and ordered the completion of the Keystone XL pipeline. Tara Houska, national campaigns director for Honor the Earth and a tribal attorney considers what these latest actions will mean for the tribes of the Dakotas. 
  • Lawmakers in Oklahoma are grappling with a 900 million dollar budget shortfall.  The crisis is impacting the lives of Oklahomans across the state. Oklahoma Representative Leslie Osborn is the chair of Oklahoma’s House Appropriations Committee and discusses efforts to correct the state’s budget shortfall. 
  • Emily Wendler, a reporter with KOSU in Oklahoma City, discusses the tough choices local public schools are facing as they grapple with a funding crisis. And Don Wentworth, a former public school principal, discusses the significant challenges for public schools from the perspective of an educator. 

  • Leo Guevara, a Mexican immigrant and small business owner in Oklahoma City discusses his concerns about the immigration policy promises of President Donald Trump and how it's already impacting his business. 

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/24/17: Horror in Oklahoma, Trump Tackles TPP, The Brutality of Slavery

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 24, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Takeaway visits Cushing, Oklahoma, the pipeline crossroads of the world. It’s here that the market price for oil is set. It’s also a town that’s been experiencing a shakeup, literally. On November 7th, 2016, a 5.8 magnitude earthquake hit Cushing — a record for Oklahoma. Here to weigh in is Bob Noltensmeyer, Cushing emergency manager and a local business owner. 
  • Residents in the Sooner State hope that Oklahoma will play a large role in the U.S. and global energy market under President Trump. Joe Wertz, a reporter for State Impact Oklahoma, explains.
  • J.D. Strong — head of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, former director of the Water Resources Board and former Oklahoma secretary of the environment — has worked with Scott Pruitt, Donald Trump's EPA pick, for the past six years. Strong doesn't believe Pruitt is out to destroy the EPA, but he wants to bring more balance between state and federal government influence when it comes to protecting the environment.
  • President Trump has been busy signing executive orders and confirming cabinet members. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us up to speed on the latest from the Beltway.
  • Former President Barack Obama worked hard to fast-track the Trans Pacific Partnership with dozens of countries. But on Monday, President Trump signed an executive order to withdraw from the TPP and says he will also overhaul the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico. Ian Lee, a professor of strategic management and international business at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, explains how Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may approach the negotiations.
  • Ziva Branstetter, editor-in-chief of the Oklahoma-based non-profit news service The Frontier, and Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, look at corruption within the sheriff’s office and prison system in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where inmate deaths and severe incidents of prisoner abuse are commonplace.
  • In a new book, "The Price for Their Pound of Flesh," author Daina Ramey Berry puts a price tag on slavery, and explores how slaves were used as commodities through every stage of life in early America. Ramey Berry is also a professor of history at University of Texas at Austin.

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/23/17: Red State Skepticism, Why Women March, Lessons for President Trump

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 23, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Though Oklahoma is a decidedly red state, there is some serious skepticism about President Donald Trump — perhaps the biggest conservative change agent in American politics in two generations. The Takeaway hears from five people in the Sooner State as we broadcast from KOSU in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 
  • About 500,000 people attended this weekend's Women's March on Washington, and sister marches across the world drew up to 2 million people. Ellen Pogemiller, an Oklahoma City Women's March participant who works for a local non-profit, weighs in on this changing moment in American politics.

  • After 22 years in power, Gambian President Yahya Jammeh fled into exile over the weekend after finally admitting defeat by challenger Adama Barrow in the country's most recent election. Jammeh defied the international community and his own military over the past two weeks, but he has finally vacated the office. Dionne Searcey, the West Africa bureau chief for our partner The New York Times, has the details. 
  • Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes swept through Georgia and Mississippi over the weekend. So far, authorities have confirmed that at least 18 people have been killed and dozens more are injured. Bill Bunting, the chief of Forecast Operations for the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center, gives us an update on the crisis playing out in the southeast.
  • Kit Roane and Sarah Weiser, producers with the Retro Report documentary team, look back at the legacy of marine biologist Rachel Carson, who warned of the dangers of pesticides in her book "Silent Spring." 
  • The nation’s 45th president may have promised to shake things up in Washington once he was sworn in, but how much can he really change? Martha Kumar, director of the White House Transition Project, answers.

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/20/2017: A New Era in American Politics Begins

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Jan 20, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich analyzes the inauguration of President Donald Trump, along with Carolyn Ryan, senior editor for politics at The New York Times, and Glenn Coffee, a member of the Oklahoma State Senate from 1999-2011, and former Oklahoma secretary of state from 2011-2013.
  • Shirl St. Germain, a former restaurant owner in Marco Island, Florida, and Kevin Lonie, a salesman from Manchester, New Hampshire, are both supporters of President Donald Trump. They join The Takeaway discuss their hopes for the 45th president. 

  • Former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft and Republican consultant Roger Stone join The Takeaway to reflect on Donald Trump’s inauguration, and what he's likely first steps will be after taking office.
  • California Representative Barbara Lee is one of 66 Democrats who will be boycotting Donald Trump's inauguration. Lee says she will be “organizing and preparing for resistance” in lieu of attending the event.
  • President Donald Trump’s team was reportedly having difficulties booking musical guests for inaugural events. But one band is on board. Country act Tim Rushlow and his Big Band performed Thursday evening at the Make America Great Again Welcome Celebration at the Lincoln Memorial, and they'll also perform a song for the first couple’s first dance Friday evening. 
  • Charlie Brotman is known for announcing the U.S. presidential inaugural parades. For 67 years, he has delivered the announcement for 11 presidents, beginning with Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1957 through President Obama in 2013. He was replaced this year by Trump supporter and radio host Steve Ray. He joins The Takeaway to reflect on today's inauguration. 
  • The day after the inauguration, hundreds of thousands are expected to converge on D.C. for the Women’s March on Washington to demonstrate against the new administration. Two of the organizers behind the march — Breanne Butler and Nantasha Williams — weigh in today on The Takeaway. 
  • President Donald Trump in keeping with his unconventional tactics and has decided to forego a poet laureate for his inauguration ceremony. We explore poetry and politics with Richard Blanco, the 2013 inaugural poet.

 



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01/19/17: Climate Concerns, Inauguration Excitement, Guns in the Obama Era

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Jan 19, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Today is the last day of Senate confirmation hearings for before Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us from the Capitol to recap yesterday's hearings and to explain what to expect from today's proceedings. 
  • If confirmed, Scott Pruitt, Donald Trump's nominee to head the EPA, may reverse much of President Obama's environmental legacy, including signing a global agreement to reduce climate emissions. Bill McKibben, an environmentalist, co-founder of 350.org, and a scholar in residence at Middlebury College, explains what Trump's EPA can and cannot do. 
  • Hundreds of thousands of Americans are flocking to Washington D.C. for the swearing-in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. While some are going to protest, others will be heading to the nation's capital to celebrate, including Blake Roderick of Pittsfield, Illinois. He discusses his upcoming and his expectations for the incoming administration.
  • As Barack Obama prepares to leave office with his highest approval rating since assuming the presidency, Takeaway listeners from across the United States weigh in on his legacy.
  • Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-NY) and Sandro Galea, dean at the Boston University School of Public Health, look back at President Barack Obama’s legacy on gun control and why, despite the horrific mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, he wasn’t able to bring about the kind of changes he hoped for.
  • Barack Obama made history when he mobilized young people and campaigners in 2008. We talk with three volunteers who campaigned for Obama as college students — Lauren Wyatt, Molly Rivera, and Jose Torrez — and ask them to reflect on the current state of politics today. 

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/18/17: America in Perpetual War, Freeing Chelsea Manning, A First Lady's Farewell

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Jan 18, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Tuesday, President Obama announced that he would be commuting the sentence of army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning, along with the sentences of more than 200 other inmates. He also pardoned 64 individuals, including retired Marine General James Cartwright. Mark Osler, a former federal prosecutor and a law professor at the University of St. Thomas, has the details. 
  • Barack Obama's term in office is quickly coming to an end, but people are still hoping he can change their lives with a presidential pardon. Ravi Ragbir is one of those people. He weighs in along with Alina Das, law professor and co-director the Immigrants Rights Clinic at New York University.
  • On Wednesday, the Supreme Court hears oral arguments in Ziglar v. Abbasi, a civil rights lawsuit filed in 2002 on behalf of Muslim, South Asian, and Arab citizens who were swept up by the FBI during investigations into 9/11. Stephen Vladeck, a professor at the University of Texas School of Law, unpacks the case. 
  • There are a handful of major confirmation hearings on Wednesday, including Tom Price, the president-elect's choice for secretary of health and human services, Nikki Haley for U.N. ambassador and Scott Pruitt as administrator of the EPA. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what to expect from the hearings. 

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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School Politics, Pioneering Women, Obama's Foreign Policy Legacy

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 17, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Betsy DeVos, President-elect Donald Trump's pick for secretary of education, goes before the Senate today. Defenders of DeVos say her efforts to disrupt the educational establishment can only improve graduation rates across the country. But many opponents have concerns that she will use her wealth to entice states to take money away from public schools.  James Goenner, president and chief executive of the National Charter Schools Institute, and Diane Ravitch, a former assistant secretary of education under President George H.W. Bush, weigh in.
  • Over the weekend, Democrats and activists rallied to fight the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, discusses the lesser-known provisions that could be lost under a repeal.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May delivered a landmark address on Tuesday on the U.K.'s plan to leave the European Union. During her speech, she rejected partial membership in the E.U. and said the United Kingdom would "not seek membership of the single market but the greatest possible access to it." Robin Wigglesworth, U.S. markets editor for The Financial Times, explains. 
  • Today, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Lynch v. Dimaya, an immigration case that will consider whether part of the definition of “crime of violence,” which makes individuals deportable, is unconstitutionally vague. The case involves a man from the Philippines who was convicted of burglary. Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a law professor at Santa Clara University, hast the details. 
  • As the nation’s capital prepares to host tens of thousands of women for the Women’s March on Washington, we look back at a number of female trailblazers with Julie Scelfo, journalist and author of "The Women Who Made New York."
  • Is the United States stronger or weaker because of President Obama's foreign policy decisions? For answers, we turn to Susan Glasser, foreign affairs columnist at POLITICO, and Steve Clemons, Washington editor-at-large for The Atlantic.

 



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Obama's Cultural Impact, Alec Baldwin on Playing Trump, John Kerry's Legacy

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 16, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • How will history view President Obama’s efforts to reform the criminal justice system? We look back at his successes and failures with Glenn E. Martin, president and founder of the advocacy group JustLeadershipUSA.
  • John Kerry will take his last lap as secretary of state this week. He visited Paris over the weekend for Middle East peace talks, and will head to London today to meet with his U.K. Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson. Jonathan Marcus, diplomatic correspondent for the BBC, explores Kerry's legacy. 
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for The Guardian, TIME, and The Takeaway, looks back at Barack Obama's cultural legacy as the 44th president prepares to leave office. 
  • President Obama dedicated a number of new national monuments on Thursday that aim to preserve the country's civil rights history. Khalil Muhammad, professor of history, race, and public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the author of "The Condemnation of Blackness," looks at the significance of these monuments on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. 
  • Last week, The Takeaway spoke with actor and activist Alec Baldwin about his fight to shut down the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant just north of New York City. Today, Baldwin weighs in on the election and the role as President-elect Donald Trump on "Saturday Night Live." 
  • Cornell Belcher is the author of "A Black Man In The White House" and was a lead pollster for the Democratic National Committee under Howard Dean. He was also a member of President Obama’s polling team for both the 2008 and 2012 campaigns, and speaks with Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich about the racial politics that divide the country today.


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Investigating the FBI, Actor Alec Baldwin, Fighting for LGBT Equality

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Jan 13, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Justice Department inspector general announced Thursday that he would investigate the DOJ and the FBI, and whether FBI Director James Comey followed official policy during the department’s investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails in the months leading up to the election. Michael Bromwich, the former inspector general for the Department of Justice, weighs in. 
  • Cubans coming to the U.S. will no longer be granted automatic residency under new rules announced yesterday by the Obama Administration. Tim Padgett, the Americas correspondent for public radio station WLRN in Miami, has the details.

  • Yesterday, the EPA accused Fiat Chrysler of cheating on emissions tests. The company allegedly used secret software that allowed more than 100,000 diesel vehicles to emit illegal pollutant levels, something that the EPA calls "a clear and serious violation of the Clean Air Act." John Stoll, global auto editor for The Wall Street Journal in Detroit, explains what this could med for the company and consumers. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, drops by to review the big new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including the animated children's film "Monster Trucks," and the horror flick "The Bye Bye Man."
  • Actor Alec Baldwin and activist Paul Gallay, president of the advocacy group Riverkeeper, discuss the closing of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant in New York, and the future of renewable energy sources in the Empire State and beyond. 
  • A new documentary, "Growing Up Coy," tells the story of a young Colorado family fighting for their 6-year-old transgender daughter’s right to use the girls' bathroom at her elementary school. Coy Mathis' case is one of the first in the nation that specifically addresses transgender bathroom rights. The Takeaway hears from Eric Juhola, director and producer of the film, and Jeremy Stulberg, the producer and editor of "Growing Up Coy."
  • Heather Cronk, the former co-director of GetEQUAL, a national LGBTQ organizing network, examine's President Barack Obama's legacy on gay marriage, transgender rights, and LGBT discrimination. 


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Putin Frenzy, Blowback in Baltimore, Class Warfare

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Jan 12, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • How are lawmakers responding to recent allegations surrounding Russian interference in the U.S. election, and how will they hold the government and intelligence communities accountable to the American people? Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA), the ranking member of the CIA Subcommittee of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, answers. 
  • Journalist Glenn Greenwald, co-founder of the investigative news outlet The Intercept, responds to recent allegations of Russian interference in the U.S. election, and the legacy President Obama is leaving on surveillance policies.
  • Kathy Rittereiser did not vote for President-elect Donald Trump, but she is in favor of his plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. We find out what her concerns are with her current law, and what she hopes the replacement will include.
  • Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings up to speed on a busy week of Senate confirmation hearings, and what the GOP is planning when it comes to repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act.
  • Former presidential candidate Ben Carson, Donald Trump's pick for secretary of housing and urban development, goes before the Senate today for his confirmation hearing. Timothy McDaniel, an attorney and Carson's childhood friend, reflects on Carson's upbringing and how he may operate as HUD secretary. 
  • Attorney General Loretta Lynch will be in Baltimore on Thursday to speak on community policing and announce that the city has come to an agreement with the federal government on a consent decree for reform to the police department. With the state’s attorney, Marilyn Mosby, under fire for her handling of the Freddie Gray prosecutions, what does the future hold for the city of Baltimore and its police force? Marc Steiner, president and executive producer of the Center for Emerging Media and host of the Marc Steiner Show on WEAA-FM in Baltimore, weighs in. 

 



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Obama's Farewell, Russian Secrets and Trump, Military Brutality

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Jan 11, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Barack Obama delivered his final speech as president from his home city of Chicago on Tuesday night. Though he offered hope for the future, the violence plaguing the Windy City lurked in the shadows of his address. Ja’Mal Green, a community organizer and activist in Chicago, weighs in. 
  • Rex Tillerson, the former chairman and CEO of Exxon Mobil and President-elect Donald Trump's choice for secretary of state, will testify before the Senate during a confirmation hearing today. Suzanne Maloney, a former Middle East advisor for ExxonMobil and currently the deputy director of the Foreign Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, explains why Tillerson should be confirmed. 
  • An explosive but unsubstantiated report on Donald Trump and his ties to Russia is raising new questions about the president-elect’s connections to the Kremlin. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains.
  • On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Endrew V. Douglas County School District, a suit brought by a Colorado couple who claim their autistic son was not provided an adequate education in the public school system. Wayne Steedman, a senior partner with The Steedman Law Group, has over 24 years of experience as a special education attorney and examines the case.
  • On Tuesday, Dylann Roof was sentenced to death for killing nine worshippers at the Emanuel AME Church. Meg Kinnard, legal affairs reporter for the Associated Press in South Carolina, discusses Roof's sentence and explains how family members are reacting. 
  • A two and a half year investigation by The Intercept reveals a pattern of violence and abuse employed by the widely praised Seal Team 6 — the unit responsible for killing Osama bin Laden in 2011. For details on this story we turn to Matthew Cole, a reporter for The Intercept.


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Evaluating Trump's AG Pick, Unrest in Mexico, A Homeless Crisis in The Golden State

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 10, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Tuesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee will begin to hold confirmation hearings for Senator Jeff Sessions, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general. Janai Nelson, associate director-counsel of NAACP Legal, and J.D. Gordon, a former Pentagon spokesman and security and foreign policy advisor to Donald Trump's presidential campaign, examine Sessions' record. 
  • On Monday, President-elect Donald Trump announced that he would appoint his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as senior White House advisor. Norm Eisen, President Obama's White House ethics czar from 2009 to 2011 and a fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, weighs in on the potential conflicts of interest facing Kushner and Trump.
  • A double digit increase in gas prices has led to looting and protests in Mexico, and the Trump Administration’s plans to put more economic pressure on Mexico could make the situation worse and the border more difficult to protect. Elisabeth Malkin, Mexico reporter for our partners at The New York Times, weighs in. 
  • Officials estimates there are at least 6,700 homeless people living in San Francisco. The mayor and city leaders have tried lots of things to combat homelessness, but the city's homeless population has remained steady for a decade. Why has nothing worked? Kevin Fagan, a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle specializing in homelessness, weighs in.
  • The new mayor of Sacramento, California has big plans for reducing homelessness and addressing mental health issues. Many are optimistic about what he’ll accomplish, but there’s still plenty standing in his way. Darrell Steinberg, the new mayor of Sacramento, discusses his plan today on The Takeaway.
  • Today The Takeaway examines the story of Phillip Chance, a black man who died November 8th in an Alabama hospital. His decades-long journey through the criminal justice system is an epic story of missed opportunities, political grandstanding, and bad timing. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, and Jade Chance, Phillip's eldest daughter, weigh in. 


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China Goes Green, A Refugee Fight in Vermont, Actress Kristin Davis

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 09, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Last Friday, the FBI, the CIA, and the NSA released a declassified report that concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin "ordered an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the U.S. presidential election.” David Sanger, national security correspondent for our partners at The New York Times, has the details. 
  • On Friday, Esteban Santiago, a 26-year-old Iraq War veteran, opened fire at Fort Lauderdale International Airport and killed five people. Santiago, who allegedly sought help for mental problems weeks ago, will make his first appearance in court today. For more on this story we turn to Davie Ovalle, who has been covering the story for the Miami Herald.

  • President-elect Donald Trump says he will build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, though questions about who will pay for it are still up in the air. How will the wall affect people who own property on the Rio Grande? Travis Bubenik, a reporter with Marfa Public Radio in Texas, weighs in. 
  • In an unusual move, Donald Trump's transition team issued an order stating that all politically appointed American ambassadors need to leave their posts by Inauguration Day, with no grace period. W. Robert Pearson, ambassador to Turkey between 2000 and 2003, and currently a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington, joins The Takeaway to discuss the coming transition. 
  • China plans to spend more than $360 billion on renewable power sources and expects to dominate the renewable energy sector by 2020. Sam Geall, the executive editor of Chinadialogue and a research fellow at the Science Policy Research Unit, joins us to discuss the impact of China's latest announcement and how the nation may shape age of renewable energy going forward.
  • The small city of Rutland, Vermont is making plans to welcome 100 Syrian and Iraqi refugees this month. But the issue has sharply divided its residents. Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras weighs in. 
  • Journalist Rebecca Carroll speaks with actress Kristin Davis. Davis, who is white, adopted a black daughter, and discusses her experience with race in America. 


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Obamanomics, A Vietnam War Legacy, The Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds Connection

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Jan 06, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The final jobs report of Barack Obama’s presidency will be released today. We look at the progress and economic setbacks he’s had over the last eight years with Kenneth Rogoff, a professor of economics at Harvard and a former chief economist with the International Monetary Fund, and Gillian Tett, U.S. managing editor of the Financial Times.
  • According to the United Nations, more than 7,000 have been killed in the Yemeni civil war since March 2015, and there are reports that around 2.2 million children are suffering from severe malnutrition as a result of the ongoing conflict. Adam Baron, a visiting fellow with the European Council on Foreign Relations and researcher at the Institute for Social Anthropology, weighs in.
  • Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker discusses the TV shows you should be watching, including "This Is Us," "Girls," "Homeland," and "Planet Earth II." Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, offers a preview of the 2017 Golden Globe awards, which kick off this Sunday. 
  • In 1967, journalist Harrison Salisbury changed the way Americans viewed the Vietnam War and exposed the gap between political speak and public access to information. We explore how Salisbury forever changed U.S. politics with rare audio from the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.
  • Filmmaker Fisher Stevens discusses his new HBO film, "Bright Lights," which is an intimate look into the personal relationship between Debbie Reynolds and her daughter, Carrie Fisher.  


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The Fighting Feminist, The Keyboard Army, The Defiant Optimist

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Jan 05, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Senate Armed Services Committee holds their first hearing on alleged Russian hacking today, despite persistent skepticism from President-elect Donald Trump. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details.
  • This week, three notable writers announced plans to leave Twitter. Among them is feminist writer Lindy West, who has long said that the social media service hasn’t done enough to reign in trolls. She discusses her experience today on The Takeaway. 
  • Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte allegedly had a “keyboard army” of backers in the lead up to his election, some paid and some not, who posted on social media to silence dissenters and help create the illusion that he had widespread support. Sean Williams, a journalist reporting for The New Republic, explains. 
  • Durreen Shahnaz was the first Bangladeshi woman to graduate from the Wharton School of Business and to work on Wall Street. She launched the Impact Investment Exchange Asia in 2013 — the social stock exchange is going strong today and has funded a number of projects, including an initiative to convert power plants in Cambodia from diesel to biofuel. 
  • The sentencing trial for Dylann Roof is set to continue today with more than 30 witnesses testifying for federal attorneys. Jennifer Berry Hawes, a reporter The Post and Courier in South Carolina and author of an upcoming book about the Emanuel AME Church shooting, and Professor John Blume of Cornell Law School, weigh in on the trial and what's next. 
  • Republicans have vowed to repeal and replace the Affordable Health Care Act. That makes Jacob Atkins, who is HIV positive, very nervous. He shares his story along with Mehgan McCarthy, a healthcare coordinator who helped Atkins navigate the insurance exchanges and get coverage through Obamacare.


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Obamacare Up in Smoke, Ford Challenges Trump, Fighting Terror With Music

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Jan 04, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • As Republicans rally to repeal Obamacare, The Takeaway considers the future of the Affordable Care Act with Jonathan Gruber, one of the architects of the ACA and an economics professor at MIT, and Ren?e Landers, a professor of law at Suffolk University.
  • On Tuesday, the Ford Motor Company announced that it was scrapping plans to build a new manufacturing plant in Mexico. The decision comes amid criticism from the Trump administration, but Ford says the decision was not made because of political pressure. Joe Hinrichs, president of the Americas at Ford Motor Company, explains. 
  • We continue our look at Chicago gun violence with a personal essay from Edwin Day, a former gang member who now works with youth to steer them away from gun violence.
  • Diagnosed at the age of 17 with epilepsy and bipolar disorder, Sitawa Wafula found few avenues for support in her home country of Kenya. She started a blog about living with mental illness and has now set up Kenya’s first free mental health support line, "My Mind, My Funk."
  • The U.N. face many challenges in the year ahead, including ending the war in Syria and continuing to address and reign in climate change. Jan Eliasson, a Swedish diplomat who served as deputy secretary-general of the United Nations from July 2012 to December 2016, reflects on the challenges ahead for the United Nations in 2017. 
  • Karim Wasfi, a renowned cellist and the conductor of the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra, uses music to heal in the face of terror. Last year, after a deadly car bomb exploded in a cafe, he sat with his cello and played amid the charred remains in protest of the violence and to “equalize” the terror with an act of creativity and beauty.


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The Top Risks of 2017, Violence in Chicago, The New Space Race

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 03, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • If 2016 produced a global shift in political power, what does 2017 hold? Ian Bremmer, president and founder of the Eurasia Group, a political consulting firm, joins The Takeaway to discuss the top risks facing the world in 2017. 
  • Congress is back in session today, and lawmakers already have a full plate. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what's on the agenda. 
  • One of the most brutal prison riots in history occurred in the Brazilian city of Manaus on Sunday. The 17 hour blood bath killed about 60 people — the riot is part of a growing cocaine turf war. Simon Romero, Brazil bureau chief for our partners at The New York Times, has the details.
  • Violence plagued Chicago in 2016, but gun deaths are still lower than they were in the 1990s. Chicago resident Seonia Owens reflects on the life and death of her son, Robert Owens, who was 15 when he was fatally shot in 1998. She joins The Takeaway with her daughter, Sharon Burgman-Owens, Robert’s older sister.
  • Children under the age of 13 were injured or killed in 41 shooting incidents last year in the city of Chicago. Patrick Smith, a reporter from member station WBEZ, has been combing through the data and explains how people in Chicago are coping with violence in the Windy City. 
  • Renewed interest in space exploration in both the private and public sectors is creating a new space race. Emily Rice, a professor of astrophysics at the College of Staten Island and the CUNY Graduate Center, and a researcher at the American Museum of Natural History, has the details. 


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Attack in Turkey, Corruption at the Department of Homeland Security, O.J. Simpson and Race in America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 02, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • An attack on an upscale Istanbul nightclub on New Year's Eve left 39 people dead and nearly 70 wounded. This is the fourth terrorist attack in Turkey this month, and poses deep questions for a government currently enmeshed in the Syrian ceasefire. Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for BuzzFeed News, reports.
  • New York Times investigation found employees and contractors working for the Department of Homeland Security took $15 million in bribes over the last ten years. Nearly 200 workers are implicated in the controversy for allowing illegal immigrants and drugs to pass across the border unchecked, in addition to illegally selling green cards and other documents. Ron Nixon, Washington Correspondent covering homeland security for The New York Times, and James Tomsheck, former chief of internal affairs with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, discuss the investigation. 
  • The Chinese government announced on Friday that it would set a one-year timeline for banning its legal ivory trade, charting a new path in protecting elephants from extinction.  Elly Pepper, Deputy Director of the Wildlife Trade Initiative at the Natural Resources Defense Council, talks about how this ban will impact the poaching industry.
  • As part of “How I Got Over It,” Rebecca Carroll’s ongoing series of conversations about race in America, Carroll sits down with Ezra Edelman, the director of "O.J.: Made in America," a new documentary that depicts the journey of O.J. Simpson from college football star to defendant in one of America's most high profile murder cases.
  • Global events like Brexit, the Syrian civil war and the refugee crisis sparked calls for activism in 2016, and many post-election conversations have centered on how individuals can be more engaged and motivated to take action for change. Duncan Green,  author of "How Change Happens," tries to answer the question, "How do we create change in 2017?"



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The Transformation of Truth, U.S. Retaliates Against Russia, Modern Nuclear Proliferation

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 30, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The most fundamental change in 2016 has been the redefinition of truth in the minds of Americans. According  Jay Rosen, NYU professor and author of PressThink, a blog about journalism in the digital age, the rejection of facts and the politicization of truth that came to a height in 2016 is disabling serious journalism. In his latest series of blog posts, he explores what went wrong, offers some long term solutions, and looks for the bright spots in this post-fact world.
  • On Thursday, the Obama administration announced a long awaited punishment for Russian involvement in the hacking of the DNC that includes the ejection of 35 Russian intelligence operatives from the United States and new sanctions on Russia’s intelligence services. Kimberly Marten, professor of political science at Barnard College, Columbia University, sheds light on this new development. 

  • The latest discovery from Andrew Gulli of the Strand Magazine comes from the deep trove of H.G. Wells. It’s a short story called "The Haunted Ceiling," and Gulli discovered it by going through the thousands of titles in the rare books section of the University of Illinois library.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, takes a look at some of the other big releases from the month of December that are worth seeing over the holiday weekend: Hidden Figures, Silence, Lion and Sing.
  • Richard Garwinphysicist and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, is one of the designers of the first hydrogen bomb, and today he is an opponent of nuclear expansion.  He reflects on the state of nuclear proliferation today in this particularly tense moment for U.S.-Russia relations.


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Israel: A Fragile Relationship, Food Trafficking in Venezuela, A Solo Pianist Reimagines The Dead

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 29, 2016


Coming up on today's show: 

  •  On Wednesday, Secretary of State John Kerry delivered an impassioned speech from the State Department, reiterating his support for a two state solution and appearing to direct his remarks more at Israeli public opinion than the U.S. George MitchellPresident Obama’s former special envoy to the Middle East and retired Senator from Maine, shares his perspective on the history of the U.S.-Israeli relationship and what's changing today.

  • Lori Lowenthal Marcus is a lawyer and the co-chair of the Jews Choose Trump organization. She lends insight into how Jewish supporters of Donald Trump are responding to the latest upheaval in U.S.-Israeli relations, and lays out her expectations for a Trump presidency.
  •  Dave Zirin, Sports Editor for The Nation magazine, gives a recap of the year in sports and social justice from Colin Kaepernick protests, to the failures and successes of the Olympics in Brazil, to the death of Muhammad Ali.
  • An investigation by the Associated Press has found that the military is operating a major food trafficking scheme in a country with millions on the brink of starvation, operating illegal food markets and setting the price of goods. Hannah Dreier, Venezuela correspondent for The Associated Press, was part of that investigation. She shares what she found.
  • Thousands have been killed since Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte began his crackdown on drugs and drug users, but despite international condemnation, his approval ratings remain high. Reporter Aurora Almendral spent a night on patrol with the Manilla police department. She shares her experience and describes what the war on drug users and dealers looks like from the ground.
  • Pianist Holly Bowling has made a name for herself reinterpreting the music of Phish and The Grateful Dead for solo piano. She joins The Takeaway to talk about her new album Better Left Unsung, out this month.


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Gun Violence on Christmas, Judicial Vacancies for Trump, Drought in California and a Town Without Water

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Dec 28, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Former Presidential candidate Ralph Nader reflects on the health of the Democratic party in 2016, which lost more than 1,000 positions under Obama, and the future of the movement Bernie Sanders started.
  • 61 were people shot in Chicago over the holiday weekend, 11 fatally, rounding out a particularly violent year for the city whose murder rate is at its highest point since the 1990s. The surge in violence is a reminder of the failures of the city to address gun violence despite a national spotlight on the issue. Gary Slutkin, founder of Cure Violence, an anti-gun violence initiative that has seen periodic funding cuts, shares his perspective.
  • When Donald Trump takes office, he will be handed close to 100 judicial vacancies, nearly double what President Obama had when entering office. An array of openings throughout the federal and district courts will allow Trump to have a lasting impact on the composition of the courts. Russell Wheelervisiting fellow at the Brookings Institution's Governance Studies Program and an expert in the federal judicial selection process, says this could drastically change the judiciary.
  • California is in its sixth year of drought and last year's El Nino rainy season did little to help, especially in Southern California, which is far below normal precipitation totals. The drought could also play a role in a possible fight between regulation-favoring state officials like Governor Jerry Brown and President-elect Donald Trump. Jean Moran, professor in Earth and Environmental Sciences at Cal State University East Bay, explains.
  • Although California is in a drought, the Texas town of Sandbranch has not had potable water for 30 years. Residents used wells, but in the 1980s that water got contaminated. Meanwhile, Dallas is one of the wealthiest cities in the country, causing residents to wonder why the county can't help pay for running water in the town. Reverend Eugene Keahey is a pastor of Mount Zion Baptist Church who visited the town and decided to stay put.


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Israeli Settlements Push Ahead, The Next Step in Cyberdeterrence, The Loss of George Michael

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Dec 27, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In defiance of a U.N. Security Council Resolution, Israel will move ahead with plans to build thousands of new settlements in a predominantly Palestinian section of East Jerusalem. According to the U.N., the settlements are a "flagrant violation under international law." The U.S. surprisingly abstained from the vote, drawing sharp criticism from Benjamin Netanyahu and the Israeli government. Daniel Levy, president of the U.S./Middle East Project weighs in.
  • San Diego’s deep water cargo port is looking for a larger slice of the import-export market, but expansion plans could bring more than just cargo.  Nearby neighbors worry there will be extra pollution if business picks up.  Erik Anderson reports from KPBS in San Diego.
  • London is facing the worst pollution levels seen in years, with nitrogen dioxide levels higher than Beijing. We look at the failures of regulation that have led to this pollution and what can be done to fix it. Martin Williams, Professor at King's College in London and air quality scientist explains what this means for the city nicknamed "The Big Smoke."
  • This week, details surrounding the Russian hack of the DNC continued to emerge, as it became apparent that Russia’s military intelligence arm was linked to the hacking. Some security experts are calling for better cyberdeterrence as part of a more comprehensive cyber security strategy.  Chris Demchak, professor at the U.S. Naval War College and RADM Grace M. Hopper Chair of Cybersecurity, explains what that strategy might look like.
  • The United States military throws away a lot of stuff, and much of it is too dangerous to let it sit in a landfill. So how did U.S. Troops stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan dispose of their trash?  Giant burn pits operated by Kellog Brown and Root, a former subsidiary of Haliburton paid to dispose of toxic chemicals, expired Meals Ready to Eat, batteries, MK-19 rounds and DEET soaked tents. All incinerated in open landfills creating serious health hazards for troops, contractors and locals. Jennifer Percy, a contributing editor at The New Republic, talks about her new story "The Things They Burned." She's joined by Senior Master Sergeant Jessey Baca who completed two tours in Iraq and has since been diagnosed with a terminal illness.
  • The death of pop singer George Michael comes at the end of a year of particularly heavy losses in the music world. Michael Musto, a New York City Based Journalist and columnist for The Village Voice and Out.com, talks about Michael's importance to the pop world and gay culture.


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Urban Resilience: How American Cities are Innovating for The 21st Century

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Dec 26, 2016


Over the last year, The Takeaway has been exploring the idea of “urban resilience” with a number of public radio stations, including KPBS in San Diego, OPB in Portland, WDET in Detroit, and KUT in Austin. And today, as part of our year in review, we’re exploring innovation and technology in the 21st century. Here’s what you’ll find in this special episode:

  • How resilient are this nation's cities in times of stress? We put that question to Dan Zarrilli, New York City's chief resilience officer and the senior director of climate policy and programs. He oversees New York's preparedness in light of climate change predictions. Zarilli says having someone focused on climate change helps with disaster planning.
  • The small town of Borrego Springs, California is home to about 3,400 people. But as power outages roll across the Golden State, this tiny community has been able to do something few other towns have: Get off the grid entirely. Erik Anderson, a reporter for KPBS, explains.
  • The winter of 2015 was the warmest in the lower 48 states since record keeping started 121 years ago, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The world’s warming climate is already having an impact on places like Austin, Texas, according to KUT Reporter Mose Buchele.
  • The majority of U.S. cities had electricity by the 1930s, but that wasn't the case in rural parts of the country. Nowadays, many rural areas in America are still waiting for high-speed internet. Christopher Mitchell, director of Community Broadband Networks at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, Minnesota, explains what it’ll take to spread fiber optic cables across rural parts of the nation.
  • For years, environmental regulators knew Portland, Oregon had an air pollution problem. But now researchers with the U.S. Forest Service have found a way to use the city’s tree moss to test for air pollution. Cassandra Profita from Oregon Public Broadcasting hit the streets to find out more.
  • When the city of Detroit emerged from the nation’s largest-ever municipal bankruptcy two years ago, it was left with a razor-thin financial cushion. Now, Detroit’s downtown is booming with new construction, but some long-time residents — primarily African Americans — fear the investment isn’t about them. WDET’s Quinn Klinefelter explains.


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In Focus: Exploring Black Representation in Entertainment

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 23, 2016


After back to back years of #OscarsSoWhite, 2016 has opened up promising new opportunities for black Americans in entertainment. In this special episode, The Takeaway is exploring the history and rise of African-Americans in television, film, and theater. Here’s what you’ll find in today’s show:

  • Scott Heath is a cultural theorist and professor of English at Georgia State University. He says there has been a marked shift in the last several decades when it comes to the ways black stories are presented.
  • It's been 25 years since Julie Dash's film "Daughters of the Dust" was released. It was the first movie directed by an African-American woman to receive a theatrical release in the U.S., and the only film to date by a black woman that has been added to the National Film Registry. Dash explores the evolution of black women in filmmaking, and the challenges that still lie ahead.
  • Legendary producer, writer, and director Norman Lear says he wasn't aware he was making history when he first introduced a family like “The Jeffersons” in 1975, but that’s exactly what he did. He discusses how sitcoms can engage viewers on topics of race and class through social commentary.
  • The intersection of race and culture can not only entertain, but also educate and help change the lens through which history and society is viewed, according to Jennifer Nikki Kidwell and Scott Sheppard, the co-creators and performers in the thought-provoking stage play, "The Underground Railroad Game.”
  • There's been so much buzz this year about the diversity in movies and television shows, and the African American Film Critics Association is confident that the #OscarsSoWhite hashtag won’t surface again this year. Gil Robertson, co-founder and president of the African American Film Critics Association, explains.
  • Actress and singer Leslie Uggams has seen the entertainment industry change in recent decades — she’s been in show business since the age of six, and since then, she's moved seamlessly between film, television, and theater. Uggams is a cultural pioneer, a woman who saw her break-through role come in 1977 when she played the role of "Kizzy Reynolds" in the television miniseries "Roots.”
  • Thought lost for decades, work has begun recently to restore "Cane River," a little seen film by Horace Jenkins, a black director who died months after the film's premiere in 1982. Horace Jenkins's son, Sacha Jenkins, was just 11 at the time of his father's death and has never seen a completed version of the film. A writer and director himself, he is in the early stages of research for a documentary on the making of "Cane River," and joins The Takeaway to discuss his father's legacy today. 


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The Year in Photos, Tension in South Sudan, The Art of Spoken Word

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 22, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Which photographs made the biggest impact this year? The Takeaway talks with some of the photographers behind the most memorable and haunting photos of 2016, including Jeffrey Scales, photo editor at The New York Times, Ben Lowy, who covered the election for TIME, and Stephanie Keith, a photographer for Reuters, Getty, and The New York Times. 
  • After a Christmas market was attacked earlier this week, Germany is now confronting a new reality about security that may conflict with its previous open door policy on migrants and refugees. Constanze Stelzenm?ller, Robert Bosch senior fellow with the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings, explains. 
  • Last week, more than 150 documentary filmmakers and photojournalists signed an open letter to camera giants like Nikon, Canon and Olympus, calling for the manufacturers to build encryption into their products to help protect the individuals behind the lens. Harlo Holmes, director of newsroom digital security at Freedom of the Press Foundation, has the details. 
  • On any given day, there are approximately 415,000 children living in foster care. We take a closer look at the foster care system through the eyes of child welfare advocate Marcia Robinson Lowry, a lawyer and the founder and executive director of the advocacy group A Better Childhood.
  • Two years after South Sudan's civil war, militias in the country have started to mobilize along ethnic lines. Last month, the head U.N. Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan said that "the scale of rape of women and girls is frankly mind boggling," and that the nation is on the cusp of another ethnic conflict. Ken Scott, U.N. commissioner on Human Rights in South Sudan, weighs in. 
  • George Watsky is a rapper and spoken word poet. His art often blurs the lines between music and theater, and he joins The Takeaway today to discuss his creative process. 


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Complicity in Aleppo, A Flood of Opioids, The 14th Librarian of Congress

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Dec 21, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Though the United States has been notably absent from diplomatic talks in recent days, the last of those trapped in the Syrian city of Aleppo are expected to be evacuated today after discussions between Russia, Iran, and Turkey. Ryan Crocker served 37 years in the Foreign Service and is the former ambassador to Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Kuwait, Afghanistan and Lebanon. He explores what's next in the Syrian civil war. 
  • Records obtained by The Charleston Gazette-Mail in West Virginia show that pharmacies were flooded with 780 million pain killers in the state between 2007 and 2012. While deaths from overdoses climbed, drug wholesalers continued to ship massive amounts of pain pills. Eric W. Eyre, a reporter for Charleston Gazette-Mail, explains.
  • Governor Pat McCrory will hold a special legislative session to consider repeal of HB2, the state’s “bathroom bill,” which has drawn fierce criticism and cost the state millions of dollars in business. Erica Lachowitz, a trans advocate for equality based in Charlotte, has the details.
  • This year has been full of important moments that we all shared together collectively. Shaun King, the senior justice writer for The New York Daily News, reflects on how he has covered everything from police shootings to random acts of racism across the country.
  • Carla Hayden, the 14th Librarian of Congress, was sworn in this past September. She is the first woman and the first African American to lead the Library of Congress, and she joins the program to discuss her plan to bring the library into the future.


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Terror in Ankara and Berlin, Charges in Flint, An Immigrant's View from Trump Tower

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Dec 20, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Andrey G. Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, was shot and killed in a gallery in Ankara on Monday. The assassination came a day before defense ministers from Iran, Russia, and Turkey were scheduled to meet in Moscow to discuss the Syrian civil war. Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for BuzzFeed, explains how this killing may impact relations between Russia and Turkey, and the crisis in Aleppo. 
  • On Monday night, a truck plowed into a Christmas market outside of the Kaiser Wilhelm memorial church in Berlin, killing at least 12 people and injuring dozens of others. A suspected driver was arrested near the scene, but a passenger in the truck died during the crash. Thalia Beaty, a freelance print and radio journalist in Berlin, has the details on the attack. 
  • A review released late last week found that a state agency in Michigan wrongly accused individuals in at least 20,000 cases of fraudulently seeking unemployment payments. Jennifer Lord, an attorney with the law firm Pitt, McGehee, Palmer & Rivers who is representing clients falsely accused of fraud in a class action suit, weighs in on the case.
  • There have been major protests in Warsaw, Poland, recently following the populist right-wing government's announcement that it intends to limit news media access to parliament. Adam Easton, BBC correspondent in Warsaw, says that critics are complaining that the proposed new rules are part of an ongoing effort by the ruling party to consolidate power.
  • On Monday, Christine LaGarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, was found guilty in French court for her misuse of public funds while in office as finance minister. Edwin Truman, a non-resident senior fellow of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, explains what's next. 
  • Kunal Sood is an immigrant on an F1 visa from Uttar Pradesh, India. He has experienced this election through the unique vantage of being an immigrant in America, who happens to also live in Trump Tower. He says the 2016 campaign challenged his ideas of what America really is.

 



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Pleading With Electors, Tillerson Leaks, 30 Years on Death Row

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Dec 19, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The election of Donald Trump has thrust the intricacies of the Electoral College into the spotlight. There has been great upheaval within the Electoral College this year, with some electors pushing to write in a different Republican candidate, and others demanding a briefing on Russian election interference. Lee Snover, a Donald Trump elector, tells Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich why she is feeling a bit disappointed by the president-elect. 
  • As the inauguration of North Carolina's Democratic Governor-elect Roy Cooper approaches, the Republican-led legislature passed bills this Friday to limit the incoming governor's power. Grier Martin, a Democratic member of the North Carolina House of Representatives, representing District 34, explains.
  • The drinking water supply in Corpus Christi, Texas has been contaminated by an asphalt emulsifier, and now officials are instructing residents not to use their tap water or attempt to treat it at home. Matt Woolbright, data reporter for the Corpus Christi Caller Times, has the details on this crisis. 
  • A Brennan Center report compiling three years of research finds that 39 percent of the incarcerated prison population poses little to no threat to public safety. Inimai Chettiar, director of the Brennan Center's Justice Program, has the details. 
  • Anthony Ray Hinton spent 30 years on death row for a crime he did not commit. He joins The Takeaway to discuss his experience and what it reveals about the criminal justice system.


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Refugee Danger, Mall Madness, Holiday Films

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 16, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • To date, 2016 has been the deadliest year to date for migrants crossing the Mediterranean. Ahead of International Migrants Day, The Takeaway speaks to Greek Filmmaker Daphne Matziaraki, who discusses her short film that follows one Coast Guard ship in the Mediterranean.
  • Senator Bob Graham, the former chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, discusses the U.S. relationship with Russia amidst investigations into hacking, and why civic engagement is so important in this moment.
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, brings us the season’s best holiday movies to catch. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new films hitting the box office this weekend, including the new "Star Wars" movie, "Collateral Beauty," and "Fences."
  • There is only one large suburban mall currently under construction in the U.S. and it's located in East Rutherford, New Jersey. In a new five-part series called "Mall Madness," WNYC Reporter Ilya Marritz examines the origins of the project, and whether it's finally going to get built.
  • Russian interference in the presidential election has divided Republicans. Chris Deaton, online editor at the Weekly Standard, a conservative magazine, explains.

     



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Devastation in Syria, Cybersecurity, The Evolution of Glam

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 15, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Though civilians are being evacuated, devastation and destruction continues in Aleppo. Basel Marshall was once a college student in Aleppo. Originally from Raqqa, this 24-year-old successfully made it to Germany last year. As he watches his homeland be destroyed from afar, he shares his story with The Takeaway.
  • On Thursday, President-elect Donald Trump was supposed to hold a press conference with his family to address his many business conflicts of interest. Instead, he postponed that announcement, and took to Twitter to inform journalists that no new deals would be made. We look at how Trump’s business ties are already jeopardizing U.S. interests with Matthew T. Sanderson, a lawyer and Republican who has worked on the presidential campaigns of Senators John McCain and Rand Paul, and Governor Rick Perry.
  • The U.S. Department of Education has sent representatives to Edinburg, Texas to evaluate whether the Texas Education Agency deliberately kept a certain percentage of students out of special education services. Bill Zeeble, a reporter for KERA in North Texas, has the details. 
  • The Federal Reserve raised its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday. It's just the second time in a decade that the fed has raised rates. Charlie Herman, business and culture editor for WNYC, discusses the Fed's decision and what this means for the economy under a Trump administration.
  • Yesterday, Yahoo announced that over 1 billion of its user accounts had been compromised in 2013. For more on this hack we turn to Kim Zetter, a journalist and author covering cyber security for publications like WIRED, The Washington Post, and The Intercept, and other publications.


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Humanity in Crisis, Nuclear Energy, Trump and Tech

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Dec 14, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Rick Perry, the former Texas governor and a failed presidential candidate, is President-elect Donald Trump's pick for energy secretary. During the campaign, the Trump team looked at ways to keep nuclear power alive. What would that look like, and what are the risks? Gregory Jaczko, former chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, answers.
  • The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty was adopted by the United Nations Security Council 20 years ago this past September. Lassina Zerbo, executive secretary of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization, explains how the organization detects nuclear tests.

  • Allegations that Russia worked to influence the 2016 presidential election has dominated the news this week. U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, joins The Takeaway to discuss his concerns over Rex Tillerson, President-elect Trump's pick for secretary of state, and the U.S. approach to dealing with Russian President Vladimir Putin.
  • Civilians in the besieged Syrian city of Aleppo are reportedly not being allowed to leave after a Russian-brokered peace deal fell apart last night as fighting resumed. Kareem Shaheen, a Middle East reporter for The Guardian based in Beirut, explains.
  • A pipeline 150 miles from the site of the Standing Rock protests in Belfield, North Dakota has ruptured, spilling 176,000 gallons of oil into the Little Missouri River tributary. Leigh Paterson, a reporter for Inside Energy, has the details. 
  • Amidst a shortage of food and electricity, Venezuelan President Nicol?s Maduro closed the border with Columbia this week to prevent the movement of currency. Hannah Dreier, Venezuela correspondent for The Associated Press, explains. 
  • President-elect Trump will meet in New York with Silicon Valley executives today to discuss the future relationship between the federal government and tech start ups. What can these innovators expect from the next four years? Heather Redman, a tech startup investor, answers. 


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The Fall of Aleppo, American Interference, Science-for-Hire

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Dec 13, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad have retaken the city of Aleppo, and the Islamic State has captured the ancient city of Palmyra. Thousands have been killed in the battle to retake Aleppo, but hundreds of thousands have died in Syria since the civil war began. Stephen O’Brien, the United Nations under-secretary-general for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, examines this crisis and what's next. 
  • Who will be left to deal with Syria in the new Trump Administration? President-elect Donald Trump made it official this morning by naming Exxon Mobil CEO and Chairman Rex Tillerson as his choice for secretary of state. But Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill are concerned about his nomination, according to Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich
  • After criticizing Boeing last week over high costs, Donald Trump took to Twitter on Monday to blast the cost of F-35. Under Trump, will the U.S. curb aircraft spending, and what kind of resistance will he the administration see? Mark Cancian, a senior advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, who previously oversaw Department of Defense acquisitions at the White House Office of Management and Budget, answers. 
  • So-called "science-for-hire" firms fund studies that often end up in scientific journals to specifically influence people in industry and in courtrooms.  Myron Levin is the editor and founder of FairWarning, a nonprofit news organization that focuses on public health, safety, and environmental issues, co-wrote an article about one of the biggest of these science-for-hire firms.

  • Accusations against Wells Fargo have expanded to Prudential. It appears that Prudential life insurance policies were sold fraudulently through Wells Fargo employees. Sheelah Kolhatkar, staff writer at The New Yorker, has the details. 


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Mother Russia, Race and Football, Becoming a Titan

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Dec 12, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The C.I.A. has concluded that Russia intervened in the 2016 election to help Donald Trump win the presidency, according to officials briefed on the matter. On Sunday, a bi-partisan group of senators asked for an investigation into the situation. For details on what's next, we turn to Fred Burton, a former counterterrorism agent with the U.S. State Department and the vice president of intelligence with the geopolitical strategy firm Stratfor.
  • While top officials in Washington and American voters consider Russia’s interference in the election, President-elect Donald Trump is considering Rex Tillerson, the chairman and chief executive of Exxon Mobil, for secretary of state. Tillerson has close ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin, who he has known for over two decades. David Sanger, national security correspondent correspondent for our partner The New York Times, discusses the issues at hand.
  • America's relationship with Turkey is growing increasingly testy, and last week, President Obama waived prohibitions of arms sales to a Turkish enemy, the Syrian Kurds. Mahir Zeynalov, columnist with Al Arabiya and contributor to The Huffington Post, joins The Takeaway to assess the country's international relationships. 

  • President-elect Donald Trump has plans to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, but what does that mean for the future of Medicare, which Republicans want to privatize? Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, weighs in. 
  • This week, the Retro Report documentary team takes a look at the history of patents and how the pharmaceutical research industry has been able to drive up the cost of medicine today. Clyde Haberman, a contributing writer to our partners at The New York Times, has the details. 
  • Over the course of this NFL season, the conversation has increasingly turned to the role of race on the field. Carolina Panther MVP Quarterback Cam Newton has said he is not being protected by NFL officials because he is black. Is this part of a bigger pattern? Bill Rhoden, a writer for ESPN’s “The Undefeated” and author of “Third and a Mile: The Trials and Triumphs of the Black Quarterback,” answers.


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Disability Rights, Easing Conflict in Syria, 'The Underground Railroad Game'

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 09, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In 2015, just 17.5 percent of people with a disability were employed, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retired Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), who authored the Americans with Disabilities Act, discusses how far disability rights have come, and the work that still needs to be done. 
  • How are the events of the week being discussed in conservative circles? Noah Rothman, assistant online editor of Commentary Magazine, a conservative monthly publication, answers. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the musical "La La Land," starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, and the raunchy comedy "Office Christmas Party," featuring Jennifer Aniston and Jason Bateman. 
  • A week after a fire at the Oakland artist space known as "Ghost Ship" killed 36 people, Gabe Meline, KQED's online arts editor, reflects on the tragedy of the fire, and what the space means for individuals in the community. 
  • The Syrian army has now retaken 75 percent of eastern Aleppo, which rebels had held for the past four years, and now Russia and the United States are reportedly close to reaching a deal to ease the conflict. Robin Wright, a joint fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and a contributing writer for The New Yorker, explains.


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Mandates to Govern, The EPA Under Trump, Artist Robert Glasper

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 08, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Hillary Clinton is now leading Donald Trump by more than 2.7 million in the popular vote. In a system where half the country doesn't vote, what constitutes a mandate to govern? Newton Minow, an American attorney, vice chair of the Commission on Presidential Debates and former chair of the FCC, weighs in. 
  • On Tuesday, lawmakers in Ohio approved a bill that bans abortion as early as six weeks after conception. If approved, the law would represent one of the most stringent abortion restrictions in the country, though Governor John Kasich has questioned in the past whether such a bill would be constitutional. Jennifer Branch, a civil rights attorney and partner at Gerhardstein and Branch, a law firm representing many of the abortion providers in Ohio, discusses the bill and abortion law in Ohio.  
  • On Wednesday, President-elect Trump tapped Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the EPA. Pruitt is currently waging a legal battle against President Obama’s climate change policies and is a longtime ally of the fossil fuel industry. Jeff Holmstead, former assistant administrator for air and radiation at the EPA, analyzes the impact of Pruitt's selection. 
  • Retired Marine General John Kelly was picked to lead the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday, a key post in Trump’s administration following his campaign promise to crack down on immigration and build a wall. What can we expect out of Gen. Kelly? For answers, we turn to Alan Cohn, who served in several senior policy positions at the Department of Homeland Security from 2006-2015.
  • Actress and singer Leslie Uggams has been in show business since the age of six, when she first appeared on TV. Since then, she's moved seamlessly between film, television, and theater. Uggams is a cultural pioneer, winning a Tony award for her Broadway debut in "Hallelujah, Baby!", and becoming the first African American woman to host her own TV variety show in 1970. She joins The Takeaway to discuss black representation in entertainment. 

  • Grammy winning jazz pianist Robert Glasper put out a new album, "ArtScience," in September with his group, The Robert Glasper Experiment. He reflects on his we work and creative process today on The Takeaway. 


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An Elector's Rebellion, Pentagon Waste, Remembering Pearl Harbor

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Dec 07, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • A report commissioned by Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work to investigate waste within the Pentagon shows that more than $125 billion was wasted over the course of five years. Tina Jonas, senior advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies who served as the comptroller undersecretary of defense for the Department of Defense from 2004 to 2008, weighs in on the report. How are lawmakers on Capitol Hill responding to this report? Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich answers. 
  • Donald Trump’s new Washington hotel will host an event for the Kingdom of Bahrain on Wednesday, something that's raising questions about potential conflicts of interest. Meredith McGehee, a strategic adviser at the Campaign Legal Center, explains. 
  • Ahead of the December 19th vote in the Electoral College, some electors are considering uniting against a different candidate in order to change the course of the presidency. Jerad Sutton, presidential elector for Colorado's 4th congressional district, has the details. 
  • Voters in California legalized recreational marijuana back in November, but it is unclear how things will move forward in the state over the next four years, according to David Downs, cannabis editor for the San Francisco Chronicle.
  • The archival restoration group Indie Collect has been working recently to restore Cane River, a little-seen work by Horace Jenkins, a black director who died months after his film's premiere in 1982. As part of our weeklong series on African-Americans in entertainment, we speak with Jenkins' son, Sacha Jenkins, who is himself a writer and filmmaker.
  • Wednesday marks the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. We look back at the leadership of President Roosevelt during this period with Paul Sparrow, director of the FDR Library and Museum.


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DAPL's Next Steps, Executions in Georgia, Norman Lear

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Dec 06, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • A mistrial was declared yesterday in the police shooting death of Walter Scott, an unarmed African-American man whose shooting and subsequent death was captured on both police car dash camera and cellphone video as he ran from an officer following a traffic stop for a non-working tail light. Philip Stinson, a criminologist, former police officer, and associate professor at Bowling Green State University, has the details on what's next. 
  • As Standing Rock protesters and tribal leaders celebrate a victory over the Dakota Access Pipeline, supporters of the pipeline are looking forward. Craig Stevens, spokesperson for the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now, which supports the pipeline, joins us to discuss what he expects will happen going forward.
  • A settlement has been reached in a class action lawsuit filed by a group of mentally ill prisoners against federal prison officials at ADX-Florence. The Marshall Project's Andrew Cohen and Dr. Terry Kupers, institute professor at the Wright Institute in Oakland, explain.
  • An electronic music party at an Oakland warehouse ended in tragedy last Friday night after a fire spread through a live/work space for artists. Now, the incident is reinvigorating the debate over building safety. Cy Musiker, reporter and host of "To Do List" from KQED, shares his report from Northern California.
  • The state of Georgia is set to execute William Sallie tomorrow. Sallie was convicted for murder in 1990, and missed a federal review of his sentence by eight days, in part the result of his lack of counsel following his sentencing. His execution will be Georgia’s ninth in 2016, the most of any state this year. Rhonda Cook, staff writer for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, weighs in. 
  • American rapper, singer, and writer Dessa Darling first got her start with spoken word poetry while studying philosophy at the University of Minnesota. She’s been described as "Mos Def meets Dorothy Parker," and joins The Takeaway to discuss her new single and creative process.
  • In part two of our series on black representation in entertainment, we speak with longtime television writer and producer Norman Lear about the early genesis of African-American representation in sitcoms. 


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Sioux Celebrations, Trump Worries China, Being Black in Hollywood

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Dec 05, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Sunday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not approve an easement that would allow the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota. Filmmaker Josh Fox just returned from his second trip to Standing Rock. He's director of the film "GASLAND," and brings us the latest today. 
  • For 37 years, no American president has been cleared to speak directly to a leader of Taiwan. Despite being a central policy to the U.S.-China relationship, President-elect Donald Trump broke that rule over the weekend. Bonnie Glaser, senior adviser for Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, has the details. 
  • The Supreme Court is hearing oral arguments for two cases on redistricting today. They both concern whether certain districts were purposefully drawn to pack African-American voters into majority-minority districts, lessening their overall representation in the state legislature or Congress. Richard Briffault, a professor at Columbia Law School who focuses on government and legislation, has the details. 

  • Norbert Hofert, a key figure in Austria's far-right Freedom Party, lost his bid for president against left-leaning candidate Alexander Van der Bellen. Alison Langley, a freelance journalist based in Zurich, Switzerland, and a lecturer at Webster University in Vienna, joins The Takeaway to discuss the election results.
  • In Oakland, a deadly fire has killed at least 33 people. The fire, which engulfed an artist live/work space, started Friday night during a party. John Sepulvado a reporter at KQED and host of the morning program "California Report," has the details on what happened. 

  • The 1992 film "Daughters of the Dust" was the first film directed by an African-American woman to receive a theatrical release,  and it was re-released this year. Director Julie Dash talks with us about the film, and about minority representation in entertainment.


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'Mad Dog' Defense, Alt Christmas Music, Cuban Poetry and Politics

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 02, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Up to 2,000 veterans are planning to gather next week at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline protests to act as “human shields.” Their timing is crucial: Monday is the deadline for mandatory evacuation of the site, and anyone who remains could be prosecuted for trespassing. Today we hear from Michael Wood Jr., a former Marine Corps sergeant and retired Baltimore City Police sergeant. He's one of the veterans planning to turn out at Standing Rock.
  • At a "thank you" rally last night in Cincinnati, President-elect Donald Trump announced that he has selected Retired Marine Corps General James Mattis, known as "Mad Dog," as his choice to be the next secretary of defense if he is confirmed by the Senate. Mattis retired in 2013 and would need a waiver from Congress to serve based on a requirement that a defense secretary be a civilian for at least seven years. David Rothkopf, CEO and editor of Foreign Policy, has the details on this announcement. 

  • Many Republicans who supported Trump are putting their trust in his ability to resurrect jobs in the coal industry. Can he deliver? Sheryl Gay Stolberg, mid-Atlantic bureau chief for our partners at The New York Times, weighs in. Ruby Couch, a coal miner for 35 years in Kentucky, is hopeful that Donald Trump will be able to save the coal industry.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews this week’s big new releases, including "Jackie," "La La Land," and "Silence." Culture reporter Melissa Locker brings us alternative holiday songs to get you through the next few weeks.
  • Cuban-American poet and author Richard Blanco was the first Latino, the first immigrant, and the first openly gay inaugural poet, having read his poem "One Today" at President Obama's second inauguration in 2013. Today, he reflects on the death of Fidel Castro and the future of the relationship between the United States and Cuba.



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Aleppo in Rubble, Arctic Ice, Political Cartoons

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 01, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Wednesday, the U.N. Security Council held an emergency meeting to address the humanitarian crisis in Aleppo. Frederic Hof, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East and a former special advisor for transition in Syria at the U.S. Department of State, has the details. 
  • South Korean President Park Geun-hye has asked parliament to decide how she can step down following a corruption scandal that has created a political crisis. Her father, Chung Hee, became president of South Korea after a military coup in 1961. Carter Eckert, author of "Park Chung Hee and Modern Korea: The Roots of Militarism, 1866-1945," look at the likelihood of her impeachment, and puts her leadership into the context of her father’s historic and despotic rule.
  • December 1st is World Aids Day. We look back at the progress made in the prevention and treatment of HIV with Suzan Meredith, who was diagnosed with HIV along with her two young children in 1997. She's an ambassador for the Elisabeth Glaser Pediatric Aids Foundation and an author. Also weighing in is Dr. Donna Futterman, professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and director for the Adolescent AIDS Program at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, New York.
  • On Monday night, wildfires in Great Smoky Mountain National Park roared into the resort town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, leaving at least seven dead, injuring dozens, and destroying more than 250 buildings. Larry Waters, the mayor of Sevier County, Tennessee, which includes Gatlinburg, discusses the crisis at hand. 
  • Despite heavy snowfall, extremely windy conditions and evacuation orders from state and federal officials, thousands of people continue their resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline. But Doualy Xaykaothao, a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio, tells us that a sense of unity prevails at the camps.

  • Higher global temperatures means that more sea ice is melting, which endangers not only the ecosystems in the Arctic but threatens sea level rise across the globe. Julienne Stroeve, senior research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center and a professor of polar observation at University College London, keeps careful watch on the Arctic and its sea ice.

  • Alison Bechdel's self-syndicated comic strip "Dykes to Watch Out For" ran for 25 years. It follows a group of socially conscious queer women, and served as a sharp critique of our country's aggressive foreign policy and failure to respond to the threat of global warming. In this politically environment, Bechdel has resurrected it. She joins The Takeaway today. 


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The Global Far-Right, Conflict Origins at Standing Rock, Pardon Appeals

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Nov 30, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Snowfall has made its way to North Dakota, adding pressure to the ongoing battle over the Dakota Access Pipeline. As the December 5th deadline to evacuate the encampments approaches, we look back at the origins of this fight with Karen Van Fossan, minister of Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Bismarck, North Dakota. 
  • On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Jennings v. Rodriguez, and consider whether immigrants must be guaranteed a bond hearing and possible release from custody. Cheryl David, an immigration lawyer, joins The Takeaway to discuss how this case could impact millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S.
  • Steven Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs banker, is Donald Trump's pick as secretary of the Treasury. Mnuchin served as finance chair of Trump's presidential campaign. Binyamin Applbaum, Washington correspondent for our partners at The New York Times, has the details on Mnuchin's selection. 

  • Several far-right Israeli conservatives were inspired by Donald Trump’s victory and are hopeful that he’ll deliver on his campaign promises to change decades of U.S. foreign policy towards Israel. For a look ahead, we turn to Daniel Levy, president of the U.S./Middle East Project. He also served as a peace negotiator under Israeli Prime Ministers Ehud Barak and Yitzhak Rabin.
  • As President Barack Obama's final term wraps up, activists who support whistleblowers like Edward Snowden and Chelsea Manning have been pushing to convince for the White House to pardon them before President-elect Donald Trump and his administration come into power. Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch, weighs in. 


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Infrastructure Investments, Chess Champions, Denouncing Fidel Castro

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 29, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Infrastructure was one of the main promises Donald Trump made on the campaign trail, but will the president-elect be able to get support from Republicans and Democrats in the first 100 days? Ronald A. Klain, an assistant to President Obama who oversaw the team implementing the American Recovery and Renewal Act from 2009-2011, an adviser to 2016 Hillary Clinton campaign, weighs in. 
  • On Monday, the Michigan Board of Canvassers certified Donald Trump's victory, thereby paving the way for Jill Stein, the Green Party's 2016 presidential candidate, to request a recount in the state. Stein has already officially requested recounts in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, and the Clinton campaign is backing her efforts. Brandon Dillon, chair of the Michigan Democratic Party, explains what's next.  
  • On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Moore V. Texas, a case that centers on the death penalty and people with intellectual disabilities. For details on this case we turn to Jordan Steiker, the Judge Robert M. Parker endowed chair at the University of Texas School of Law and the director of the school’s Capital Punishment Center.
  • President-elect Donald Trump has picked Congressman Tom Price, a Republican from Georgia, to head the Department of Health and Human Services. If confirmed by the Senate, Price will have an annual budget of $1 trillion and would be in a position to help dismantle one of President Obama's signature achievements: The Affordable Care Act. Mary Agnes Carey, a senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, explains what HHS may look like under Rep. Tom Price. 
  • The 2016 World Chess Championship is going into its final game on Wednesday between number one defending champion, Magnus Carlsen of Norway, and Sergey Karjakin of Russia. The two players, both in their mid-twenties, are the youngest to meet for the world championship, and could be a sign of a new age of chess. Chess grandmaster and author Maurice Ashley explains. 
  • Jury selection has resumed in the federal case of Dylann Roof, who is standing trial for the fatal shooting of nine black parishioners at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in Charleston, South Carolina last year. Jennifer Berry Hawes, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the Post and Courier in Charleston, is currently working on a book about the Emanuel AME Church massacre and joins The Takeaway for an update on the trial. 
  • How are Cubans processing the death of Fidel Castro, and how does his passing resonate in their country? Carlos Eire, professor at Yale University and author of "Waiting for Snow in Havana," which won the national book award in 2003, weighs in. 


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Election Recounts, A New Era for Cuba, Celebrating Maya Angelou

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Nov 28, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Hillary Clinton's campaign has agreed to participate in a vote recount effort led by Green Party candidate Jill Stein. But last night, President-elect Donald Trump tweeted, without evidence, that there was "serious voter fraud in Virginia, New Hampshire and California." Poorvi Vora, a professor of computer science at George Washington University, says the recount isn't as much about changing the outcome as it is about assuring voter integrity and confidence.
  • The conflicts of interests facing President-elect Donald Trump continue to grow. Eric Lipton, a Washington-based investigative reporter with our partners at The New York Times, has the details. 
  • This weekend, former Cuban leader Fidel Castro died at the age of 90. His younger brother, Raul Castro, is set to resign the presidency in 2018. Julia Sweig, a CBS News Cuba analyst and author of the book "Cuba: What Everyone Else Needs to Know," explores the future of Cuba. 
  • This week, our partners with the Retro Report documentary team explain how the fight save the Amazon Rainforest turned into a global mission. Geoffrey O'Connor, show-runner for Insurgent Media and a producer for CNN and Retro Report, weighs in. 
  • Andrea Bonilla is a college freshman who grew up undocumented. She’s now able to work legally and live openly thanks to a program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. But the initiative, which was created by President Obama, could come to an end under Donald Trump. She weighs in today on The Takeaway. 


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Got Trust? Exploring Faith and Suspicion in the 21st Century

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Nov 25, 2016


Many Americans have lost trust in U.S. institutions, politicians, and the media. Today, The Takeaway explores what it means to trust after the 2016 election. Here's what you'll find in this special podcast:

  • Looking for universal truths in a 'post-truth' world. Rebecca Carroll, producer of special projects on race at WNYC explains how trust can be shaken up when one group interprets an event differently from another. 
  • As the public watches the crisis in Flint, Michigan unfold, many Americans have begun to lose trust in their water sources, and the governmental agencies that claim it's safe. Environmental activist Erin Brockovich explores the fight for clean water.
  • A 2016 Gallup poll found that 73 percent of Americans trust the military. But retired Army Colonel Andrew Bacevich is worried about our nation's inability to decide on a core set of values.
  • Pulitzer Prize-winning author Liaquat Ahamed, the former head of the World Bank’s investment division, is no stranger to the intricacies of global financial markets. He examines American distrust of financial institutions, and Wall Street in particular, which he argues is a recurrent theme in this country, dating from the time of George Washington. 
  • Former New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan reflects on the public's distrust of the American media, and how consumers choose news sources that echo their own political views.
  • Radio personality and relationship guru Delilah takes a break from counseling her millions of devoted listeners to talk trust in love and relationships with The Takeaway.


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FDR's Four Freedoms in a Divided America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Nov 24, 2016


This Thanksgiving, a mere two weeks after the 2016 election, America has never been more divided. As we gather around to give thanks with family and friends, The Takeaway is taking a look back into history.

Before the start of World War II, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt laid out his vision for what that world should look like in his famous "Four Freedoms" speech, which he delivered in January 1941. 

“In the future days that we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded on four essential human freedoms," Roosevelt proclaimed. Those freedoms were: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.

On Thanksgiving Day, The Takeaway examines the state of those four freedoms in 2016. Here's what you'll find in this special episode:

  • After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Japanese-Americans were rounded up and held in internment camps. Setsuko Winchester, a Japanese-American ceramicist and former NPR journalist, has been visiting sights of Japanese internment for an ongoing project titled: "Freedom From Fear." She discusses her work and freedom from fear today on The Takeaway.

  • How has freedom of speech evolved since 1941? Steven Thrasher, writer-at-large and senior columnist for The Guardian U.S., and a doctoral fellow in American studies at New York University, discusses free speech in context of our changing technological landscape, through the lens of the 2016 election, and through the arch of global events. 
  • In America today almost 47 million people live in poverty — about 14.9 percent of the country. President Roosevelt tackled the problem head-on by introducing Social Security and Medicare. Father Timothy Graff, director of the Office of Human Concerns for the Archdiocese of Newark, New Jersey, explains how he understands the "freedom from want," and how it has changed since the 1940s.
  • Roosevelt could not have possibly known of the the modern problems associated with freedom when he slowly and deliberately dictated his now famous speech. And yet, his bold vision for "the freedom of every person to worship God in his own way" is a message that resonates deeply with Chaplain Lieutenant Colonel Dawud Agbere, a Ghanaian immigrant and Muslim Chaplain in the  U.S. Army. He looks at the American ideal of freedom of religion, and freedom from religion, today on The Takeaway. 



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New Precedent for the Press, Properties Around the World, Violence at Standing Rock

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Nov 23, 2016


  • Over the past few days, President-elect Trump has defied all norms of the presidential relationship with the media including criticizing a group of television anchors at a meeting earlier this week and then canceling and rescheduling a meeting with The New York Times. Former Executive editor of the New York Times Bill Keller talks about the precedent he is setting for this administration’s relationship with the media. 

  • After promising during the campaign that he would separate himself from the Trump Organization, Donald Trump tweeted on Monday that “it was well known that I have interests in properties all over the world.” Kenneth A. Gross, a partner at an international law firm who advises corporations and elected officials on ethics laws, examines the complexity of business ethics in the White House.

  • New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, who is being tapped as a future leader of the party, talks about the future of the Democratic Party after the stunning defeat of Hillary Clinton

  • South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley has been nominated for Ambassador to the United Nations. Nancy Soderberg, who held the same job under Bill Clinton, explains the position and this new development.

  • As part of our ongoing partnership with News Deeply, we hear from Fatima Askira, executive director of the Borno Women Development Initiative, who is working to rehabilitate women held by Boko Haram in Nigeria and helping them reintegrate into civilian society.

  • It has been a trying week for protesters at the Dakota Access pipeline, with conflicting reports of violence and police firing on protesters with water cannons in freezing weather. Tara Houska, a Brown professor and national campaigns director for Honor the Earth, shares her experience on the ground.

  • Almost 10 million children between the ages of 10 and 17 in this country are food insecure, meaning they don't have reliable access to enough nutritious food. Three teenagers from Portland, Oregon talk about their involvement in Home Forward, a service organization in the state.

     



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A City Without Hospitals, Divided States, Black Lives Move Forward

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 22, 2016


  • The last functioning hospitals in the rebel-held side of Aleppo have been destroyed by government strikes. What is the future of those who remain trapped in the besieged city?  Dr. Rola Hallam is a British-Syrian doctor and CEO and Founder of Can-Do, a new start up providing medical and humanitarian aid to the people of Syria. 
  • The North Carolina governorship still hasn't been called, with Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper’s lead growing to about 6,600 votes over incumbent Republican Governor Pat McCrory. If the margin remains below 10,000 votes, McCrory can call for a recount. Jeff Tiberii, Capitol Bureau Chief for North Carolina Public Radio, reports.
  • Adding to their gains in 2014, Republicans picked up five state House chambers and two state Senate chambers in the election.  David Daley, former editor in chief of Salon, explores how Republicans have been so successful at the state level and what the long term future for Democrats in the states is.
  • After a referendum in Colombia voted down a peace deal, today top leaders of the FARC in Bogota are expected to sign a new peace agreement with the government. Colombia's president Juan Manuel Santos won the Nobel Peace Prize last month for his efforts to end the war. The agreement will have to be signed, and then will likely go to Congress to debate and ratify the agreement.
  • As South Koreans call for the impeachment of President Park, gender has surfaced as a crucial factor in her presidency. Women’s groups protested her candidacy when she was elected as the country’s first female president in 2013, saying that a daughter of a dictator could not represent real women, and they now fear that the scandal will make sexism worse in a country with deeply entrenched gender inequality.  Contributing editor for The New Republic Suki Kim weighs in.
  • On the Native American reservations of northern Minnesota, cycles drug abuse and gang violence can be hard to break out of. Native American filmmaker and Executive Producer Chris Eyre teams up with Director Jack Riccobono to share the story of a gang leader and his protege in the new documentary, "The Seventh Fire."
  • The Black Lives Matter movement was born under an Obama presidency, but its supporters argue that it's more important now than ever before.  Opal Tometi, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, discusses what the next four years of the Black Lives Matter movement will look like in America.


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The Future of Healthcare, Trump's Business Interests, The NSA reacts to Russia

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Nov 21, 2016


  • Hate crimes against Muslims spiked last year to their highest level in more than a decade, while recent cabinet appointment Steve Bannon has said on tape that he doesn't want his kids to going to school with Jews. Rabbi David Fox Sandmel, the Anti-Defamation League’s director of interreligious engagement and Mehnaz Afridi, Director of the Religious Studies, Holocaust, Genocide & Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College, discuss the effect of Trump's rhetoric on Jews and Muslims.

  • President-elect Trump, who vowed to repeal Obamacare, has since said he would leave some elements intact. More than 100,000 people signed up for Obamacare the day after the election and enrollment will remain open until the end of January. Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Secretary of the Department of Health & Human Services, says that the loss of the Affordable Care Act would not only have a significant impact on the healthcare of Americans who rely on it but on the institution that helps enhance and protect the health and well-being of all Americans.  

  • While President-Elect Donald Trump was rage-tweeting S.N.L and the cast of the musical, Hamilton—effectively overshadowing the news that Trump had agreed to pay $25 million to settle lawsuits against his allegedly fraudulent Trump University—he was also busy meeting with Indian business partners, another example in a recent series of events suggesting that the incoming president has yet to separate his business interests from governing.
  • When Donald Trump was elected president, social media sites associated with ISIS and al-Qaeda celebrated Trump's victory. "Rejoice with support from Allah, and find glad tidings in the imminent demise of America at the hands of Trump,” wrote one ISIS related outlet. Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The New York Times who reports on al-Qaeda and ISIS, explains the terror groups' reaction to the election.

  • General Michael Hayden, former Director of the NSA between 1999 and 2005, and the CIA between 2006-2009, discusses how the intelligence community is responding to Russian meddling and preparing for a Trump presidency. Last week, Hayden said that the intelligence community needs to "man up" when dealing with Trump. 
  • A new film from executive producer Leonardo DiCaprio called "The Ivory Game" depicts the underbelly of ivory trafficking. The film goes undercover in Africa and China to find intelligence operatives, undercover activists, and front line rangers. Directors Kief Davidson and Richard Ladkani discuss the purpose of making their film: to serve as a riveting wake up call for the deep corruption at the center of the global ivory trafficking dilemma.



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Your Complete Guide to The Electoral College

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Nov 18, 2016


For the second time in 16 years, a candidate who lost the popular vote but won the Electoral College will go on to be the next president of the United States.

For many Americans, the entire Electoral College system remains frustrating and confusing. But today, we're here to help. Here's what you'll find in this special podcast on the Electoral College:

  • Vikram Amar, dean of the University of Illinois College of Law, explains what the Electoral College system is designed to do and what the framers intended. 
  • Dr. Gary Gregg, the chair in leadership at the University of Louisville and director of the McConnell Center, says the Electoral College is here to stay, and that's a good thing. "I think the Electoral College has sunk its tentacles deep into the American system in ways we don't give it credit for and we don't think about," he says. 
  • How do YOU feel about the U.S. Electoral College? Should we get rid of it, or keep it? If we chose presidents based on just the popular vote, would that change how you vote? Takeaway listeners from around the United States share their thoughts today. 
  • There is a way to get around the Electoral College system as we traditionally understand it without needing a Constitutional amendment. It's something called the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. New York State Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz has the details. 

  • The process of redistricting affects nearly every aspect of how we pick our elected officials, from local representatives to the president. We examine how the process actually works, and how changing maps will affect America's political future with Rebecca Tippett, Director of Carolina Demography at the Carolina Population Center at UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Washington State Senator Mike Padden is one of the only living "faithless electors" in the U.S. There have been 157 in American history — these individuals vote against the Electoral College and with the popular vote or their conscience. Here, he discusses what being an elector actually means, and what he thinks about calls for more faithless electors.


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Native American Unity, Non-Voter Views, Power, Politics and Fiction

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Nov 17, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • As inauguration day approaches, The Takeaway is examining the health of American institutions that are designed to protect our values and rights. Today, we turn our attention to Environmental Protection Agency. William Reilly, former EPA administrator under President George H.W. Bush, explores the future of climate policy under a Trump Administration. 
  • At the start of his European trip this week, President Obama expressed confidence that President-elect Donald Trump would continue our commitment to the NATO alliance. Are allies reassured, or are they readjusting under this new world order? Kurt Volker, former U.S. permanent representative to NATO, weighs in. 
  • On Wednesday, Houthi rebels in Yemen said they were ready to join a national unity government, confirming a plan set by Secretary of State John Kerry for a ceasefire to begin on Thursday. What will the future of the conflict be under a new administration, and what are the chances that peace will hold? Iona Craig, a reporter who recently wrote on Yemen for the New Statesman, answers. 
  • It’s been more than a week since the U.S. presidential election, which largely determined not by those who voted, but by those who didn’t. We talk to Tre Narcisse, who did not vote in the election and did not care who won, about his decision to sit out the election. 
  • The fight over the Dakota Access Pipeline has united representatives from more than 200 Native American groups across the United States. What does this new found unity mean for under a new administration? Jace Weaver, director of the Institute of Native American Studies, explains. 


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Stress Testing U.S. Institutions, Demonstrator Demands, The Memory Illusion

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 15, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • As inauguration day approaches, The Takeaway is examining the health of American institutions that are designed to protect our values and rights. Donald B. Verrilli Jr., former solicitor general of the United States, examines the Supreme Court. 
  • Since Donald Trump was elected seven days ago, more than 200 hate crimes have been reported to the Southern Poverty Law Center. In the days since his election, Trump has appointed a white nationalist figure, Stephen Bannon, Breitbart News executive chairman, to be his chief strategist. How do Republicans feel about this appointment? Ryan Williams, a Republican strategist and former spokesman for Mitt Romney's 2012 presidential campaign, weighs in. 
  • On Monday, The Takeaway heard from Asra Nomani, a Muslim-American, who explained why she voted for President-elect Donald Trump. Today we hear a different perspective from Suzanne Barakat, whose family members were murdered in a 2015 hate crime in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
  • As post-election demonstrations continue across the country, The Takeaway hears from Natalia Aristizabal, the lead organizer of Make the Road New York, to find out what the protesters are hoping to achieve with these demonstrations.
  • Over the weekend, more than a million South Koreans took to the streets of central Seoul and marched toward the Blue House where President Park Geun-hye lives. They're demanding her resignation amidst a growing scandal. Anna Fifield, Tokyo bureau chief for The Washington Post, has the details. 
  • This week, our friends at The Marshall Project explore a decades-old case that is still working its way through Missouri's courts. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, and Kay Lincoln, daughter of Rodney Lincoln, who was charged with the killing of JoAnn Tate before her young children, weigh in. 


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White Nationalism in The White House, Muslims for Trump, The Paris Attacks One Year Later

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Nov 14, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On the campaign trail, President-elect Donald Trump promised to cut off federal funding for so-called “sanctuary cities," a name given to 300 cities and local jurisdictions that have ignored policies that ask local law enforcement to target undocumented immigrants. Betsy Hodges, the mayor of Minneapolis, a place that's been called a "sanctuary city," looks at the proposed immigration policies of the president-elect. 
  • President-elect Donald Trump has named two of his first hires: GOP Chairman Reince Priebus will be chief of staff, and Stephen Bannon, a white nationalist figure, will have a West Wing office as chief strategist and senior counselor to the president. Meanwhile, The Democratic National Committee is reeling from Donald Trump's victory, and talking about who will lead the DNC.  Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains.
  • Since the Second World War, the U.S. has been both a keeper and defender of international order. But Jeet Heer, a senior editor at The New Republic, argues that the United States can no longer hold that position under a Trump administration. 
  • Our partners at the Retro Report documentary team explore how the 1985 "Live Aid" global concerts used to raise funds for the Ethiopian famine led to other successful social activism campaigns. Bonnie Bertram, a producer with Retro Report, weighs in. 
  • Yesterday was the one year anniversary of the Paris attacks. How do the French feel about their personal safety now, and the safety of their country as a new American leader takes office? For answers, we turn to Samuel Laurent, author of "Al-Qaeda in France."
  • Who are the silent Donald Trump supporters who turned out in droves to support their candidate on Tuesday? One of them is Asra Nomani, a Muslim woman, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, and a co-founder of the Muslim Reform Movement. She explains why she supports the president-elect. 


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Shaky Ground: Exploring the Global Turbulence of 2016

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Sat, Nov 12, 2016


Coming up in today's podcast:

  • The world is going through a turbulent period. Are we're currently experiencing an unstoppable shift in power from the West back to the East? Peter Frankopan, historian at Oxford University and author of "The Silk Roads: A New History of the World," weighs in.
  • Selina Leem is just 19-years-old and is watching her home quietly disappear. She lives in The Marshall Islands, a place that will soon be lost to climate change. She joins The Takeaway to explain how she is saying goodbye. 
  • Peter Pomerantsev, senior fellow at the Legatum Institute in London and the author of "Nothing is True and Everything is Possible," argues that we are now living in a “post-fact” environment, where people create their own narratives, no matter what the reality of any given situation might be.
  • How are all of these factors affecting American democracy, and what does the 2016 election say about where we are in terms of longterm sustainable governance? Jenny Mansbridge, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of "Beyond Adversary Democracy," weighs in. 

 



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Veterans Under Trump, #NotMyPresident, Wilmington's Whitelash

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Nov 11, 2016


  • Asha Castleberry and Daniel Cortez are two veterans from very different backgrounds with very different military pasts. On Veteran's Day, they discuss Trump, ISIS, and the veteran experience.

  • Admiral Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, spoke yesterday about the military under new leadership. That conversation continues today, as Mullen talks about unemployment, post traumatic stress, and a broken Department of Veterans Affairs that is slow on providing care to those who need it.
  • Yesterday's segment with the Alt-Right blogger Paul Ramsey drew a lot of feedback. Some were glad to hear that perspective, others not so much. Listeners call in to comment.
  • #NotMyPresident is trending on social media as thousands across the country marched through the streets in several cities to disavow President-elect Donald Trump. Listeners share their thoughts about the #NotMyPresident movement today on The Takeaway. 
  • Deep in the post-Civil War South, Wilmington, North Carolina was considered to be a "black mecca." But the African American community found themselves the targets of the only successful coup d'etat in American history: The Wilmington Race Riots of November 1898. Christopher Everett discusses his new documentary out this week, "Wilmington on Fire."
  • Peter Yarrow, folk singer and songwriter and founding member of Peter, Paul, and Mary, his daughter Bethany Yarrow, and her boyfriend renowned cellist Rufus Cappadocia recently recorded a song called "Lift Us Up," which they perform performed in-studio. It's as much as call to action as it is a call to better understand each other, an appeal towards basic empathy.


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Victory for the Alt-Right, Uncertainty for the Parties, America Unwinds

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Nov 10, 2016


  • New Yorker Staff Writer George Packer has been documenting what he calls "the unwinding of America and the formation of a new America" for years. The Takeaway asks him if the country is fully unwound, or if there is more to come. 
  • Michigan, which had an 80 percent chance of electing Hillary Clinton, represents one of the most stunning losses for the Democrats. Congresswoman Debbie Dingell joins The Takeaway to talk about what exactly went wrong in the near certain state, and what the disruption of the blue firewall means for the future of the Democratic Party.
  • While the G.O.P. swept the House and Senate, deep fissures remain. Republican strategist Kim Alfano explains what President-elect Donald Trump's victory means for the G.O.P., and how the party and conservatism will proceed alongside the populist support that got him elected.
  • President-elect Trump  has promised to strengthen the military, but his critics fear what he'll do with the nuclear codes. Admiral Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, illuminates the future of the military under President Trump.
  • How do parents tell their children about President Trump?  New York mom Aisha Khan Badi joins The Takeaway in studio to talk about how she is responding to the Trump victory as a Muslim parent to two girls.
  • Alt-right blogger Paul Ramsay embraces a Trump victory, and explains its significance for the future of a fringe movement that now finds itself center stage.


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Donald J. Trump Elected President of the United States in Shocking Victory

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Nov 09, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Donald J. Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States on Tuesday night in a shocking turn of events that defied the polls. Keli Goff, host of WNYC’s Political Party and a columnist at The Daily Beast, joins us all hour for election analysis, and Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us the latest from Pennsylvania. 
  • Overnight, Republicans were able to maintain control of both the House and the Senate. Theo Meyer, a reporter for POLITICO, has the latest on Congress.
  • Voters in 35 states decided on 163 different ballot measures on Tuesday night. Zack Stanton, digital editor for POLITICO Magazine, gives us the results. 
  • Financial markets hate surprises, and Donald Trump's win has sent banks, treasury ministers, and big corporate executives scrambling. Robin Wigglesworth, markets editor for The Financial Times, has the details. 
  • Many women across America are disappointed with the results of Tuesday's election. Feminist icon Gloria Steinem, founder of the National Women's Political Caucus and creator of Ms. magazine, looks at what's next for the women's movement. 


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Voters Have Their Say, An Election Playlist, The Supreme Court

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 08, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • For the last several months, Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has been following the U.S. presidential race from Pennsylvania. On Election Day, he joins us live from a polling place in the eastern part of the state to explain how voters are feeling.
  • The future is here. Today, a coalition of news organizations is bringing the world real-time election analysis based on web analytics and other data in a project known as ElectionlandJohn Keefe, WNYC's senior editor for Data News, has the details.
  • On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a case that questions the scope of the Fair Housing Act (FHA). The case is brought by the city of Miami, which alleges that financial institutions like Wells Fargo and Bank of America have violated the FHA through predatory lending to minorities. Amy Howe, a reporter for SCOTUS Blog, weighs in.

  • The citizens of Dixville Notch, New Hampshire are often labeled "first-in-the-nation" to vote. Why? This charming township, which is made up of just eight residents, begins voting at midnight. Tom Tillotson, Dixville Notch Town Moderator, gives us some of the first election results in the nation.
  • Since 1984, Guam's straw poll has always predicted the results of the U.S. presidential election. Tom Maxedon, news director for Public Radio Guam, brings us the latest. 
  • In the days leading up to the election, Donald Trump has been kicked off Twitter by his staff to prevent any further mishaps. Twitter has been crucial to this election, but the fate of the company may now be in jeopardy. Nathan Schneider, a journalist and professor at the University of Colorado, gives us his analysis. 
  • John Schaefer, host of WNYC's Soundcheck and New Sounds, gives us an Election Day playlist for your visit to the polls.


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Election 2016: The Final Stretch

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Nov 07, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • With less than 24 hours to go before Election Day, Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich gives us an update on the race for the White House. 
  • How are citizens around the world viewing the U.S presidential election? Today we hear from Charles Maynes, an independent radio producer and reporter based in Moscow, and Tom Mitchell, Beijing bureau chief for The Financial Times.
  • For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today, we hear from Russell Ballenger, an activist from the Minneapolis-St. Paul area.
  • With help from a couple researches from the University of Nebraska, a team at WNYC Radio has come up with a way to measure stress during the election by analyzing saliva. Amanda Aronczyk, a reporter for WNYC and the Only Human podcast, and Elaine Chen, a producer for WNYC's Only Human podcast, explain.
  • A day before the election, we do a final check in on the polls with Sam Wang, a neuroscientist at Princeton University and a data analyst and founder of the Princeton Election Consortium.
  • How are young people thinking about the 2016 election? We hear from four high school students at Excelsior Academy in Newburgh, New York. 


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Shaky Ground: Exploring the Global Turbulence of 2016

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Nov 04, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The world is going through a turbulent period. Are we're currently experiencing an unstoppable shift in power from the West back to the East? Peter Frankopan, historian at Oxford University and author of "The Silk Roads: A New History of the World," weighs in.
  • Selina Leem is just 19-years-old and is watching her home quietly disappear. She lives in The Marshall Islands, a place that will soon be lost to climate change. She joins The Takeaway to explain how she is saying goodbye. 
  • Peter Pomerantsev, senior fellow at the Legatum Institute in London and the author of "Nothing is True and Everything is Possible," argues that we are now living in a “post-fact” environment, where people create their own narratives, no matter what the reality of any given situation might be.
  • How are all of these factors affecting American democracy, and what does the 2016 election say about where we are in terms of longterm sustainable governance? Jenny Mansbridge, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of "Beyond Adversary Democracy," weighs in. 

 



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Voter Intimidation, Election Views from The Mid East, Touring Clinton Headquarters

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Nov 03, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Donald Trump has been calling on his supporters to monitor the polls for months, but it appears some instances of voter intimidation have already taken place across the country. Leah Wright Rigueur, an assistant professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, explains. 
  • The Takeaway toured Hillary Clinton's campaign headquarters in Brooklyn this week, and we heard from Amanda Finney, a digital correspondence assistant for the campaign, and Maya Harris, senior domestic policy adviser; Elan Kriegel, director of analytics; Osi Imeokparia, chief product officer; and Addisu Demissie, national voter outreach and mobilization director.
  • All this week we’ll be checking in on how citizens around the world are viewing the U.S presidential election. Today we hear from Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent, BuzzFeed News, in Turkey.

  • For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today, we hear from Pastor Rit Varriale from the Evangelical Hub community type of Shelby, North Carolina. 
  • In Missouri, the U.S. Senate race is heating up between Democratic challenger Jason Kander and Republican Roy Blunt. They're polling just a point apart despite Donald Trump’s sizable lead in the state. Jo Mannies, political reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, explains.
  • On Sunday, Will Reeve, the son of beloved actor Christopher Reeve, will run the New York City marathon in his father's honor. He's hoping to raise money for his family’s charity, which provides support for those with spinal cord injuries and funds for medical research. Will Reeve, now a contributor to ESPN, joins The Takeaway today. 


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Turkish Crackdown, Native Equality, Exploring Race & Violence With Art

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Nov 02, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In Turkey, the fallout from a failed coup attempt in July continues. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdo?an closed 15 media outlets and detained several journalists this week as part of an ongoing crackdown that has resulted in the arrests of an estimated 37,000 individuals. Elliot Ackerman, a journalist and writer based in Istanbul and the author of the novel "Green on Blue," discusses the crisis at hand. 
  • The drama of the U.S presidential election may be boosting revenues for betting companies in the U.K., but it is not just the gamblers who are interested in the outcome. Guto Harri, a political analyst based in London and former spokesman for Boris Johnson, explains how Britons are viewing the U.S. presidential election. 
  • In Ohio, Democrat Ted Strickland is up against Republican incumbent Rob Portman in a race for the U.S. Senate. With just days before the election, it appears Portman has a solid lead against Strickland. Karen Kasler, statehouse bureau chief for Ohio Public Radio, has the latest. 
  • Californians have a whopping 17 measures to vote on this Election Day. They range from a $2.00 per pack tax on cigarettes, to legalizing recreational marijuana. Marisa Lagos, KQED's government and politics reporter, has the details on these ballot initiatives. 
  • Protests continue at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline, and members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and their supporters say police are growing increasingly violent against their peaceful demonstrations. How do those opposing the protesters feel about what's happening? Craig Stevens of the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure, and Ruth Hopkins, the Dakota/Lakota Sioux writer for Indian Country Today, weigh in.
  • In a new exhibit titled “Until” at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, visual artist Nick Cave uses found objects to represent a landscape of American race and identity. According to the artist, these items need to be examined and re-imagined rather than pushed aside.


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FBI Worries, Trade Concerns, 40 Years of Punk

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 01, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Many former senior Justice Department officials believe that FBI Director James Comey made a major mistake when he decided to inform Congress of the Clinton email review. Donald Ayer, former U.S. deputy attorney general and currently a partner at the law firm Jones Day, explains.
  • The crucial race to take control of the U.S. Senate is coming to an end soon. In Wisconsin, Democrat Russ Feingold is running a tough race against Republican incumbent Ron Johnson. Shawn Johnson, capitol bureau chief for Wisconsin Public Radio, gives an update on the state of the race with a week to go until Election Day.
  • How are citizens and officials in other nations viewing the U.S. presidential election? Today, we go to Mexico to hear from Monica Campbell, editor of the Global Nation desk for PRI's"The World" in Mexico City.
  • For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today we hear from Christina Garcia of the Hispanic Centers community type. 
  • Trade has become a major talking point in this election, and with both candidates coming out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership, many voters are uncertain of where they stand on the issue. Despite concerns over globalization, international trade is no longer on the rise for the first time since WWII. Matthew Slaughter, dean of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth and professor of international business, explains.
  • Two years after the Russian annexation of Crimea, much of the world has forgotten about the war that continues in eastern Ukraine. Sophie Pinkham, author of "Black Square: Adventures in Post-Soviet Ukraine," spent years living in Kiev after a short stay and Russia, and captures the conflict in her new book.
  • To celebrate 40 years of punk rock, Cornell University is hosting a five day long punk rock conference starting Tuesday. For a look at how the genre has changed, we turn to Katie Alice Greer, a vocalist and lyricist for D.C.-based band Priests. Their album, "Nothing Feels Natural," will be out January 27th.


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The October Email Surprise, Actor Ethan Hawke, Voter Voices

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Oct 31, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • How will FBI Director James Comey's announcement regarding newly discovered emails related to Hillary Clinton affect the election? With just eight days to go, we hear from Takeaway Washington Todd Zwillich, who brings us the latest on the race for the White House.
  • In the run-up to Election Day, we’re reporting on how the presidential race is viewed abroad. First up, we hear from Laura Lynch, CBC reporter in Canada, who explains what our neighbors to the north are thinking.
  • Open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act begins tomorrow. Dr. Sara Collins,  the vice president of healthcare coverage and access at The Commonwealth Fund, a health policy research organization, provides useful tips on successfully finding coverage.
  • Using data from election results, economic numbers, consumer surveys and polling, the American Communities Project has mapped every single county in America and assigned it a “community type” based on different demographics. What do we know about the election when looking at these communities? Dante Chinni, director of the American Communities project and a data reporter with the Wall Street Journal, answers. 
  • For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today we hear from Lindsay Hansen Park of the LDS community type.
  • Last night, the National Geographic docu-series "Years of Living Dangerously" returned for a second season. Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times Columnist Thomas Friedman is a correspondent for the series, and he joins The Takeaway to explain how climate change is and isn't being covered this election season. 


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The Bundy Brothers, Chicago Accents, Victoria Woodhull

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Oct 28, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Ammon and Ryan Bundy, along with five other anti-government protesters, were acquitted on Thursday of federal conspiracy and weapons charges. The charges had been brought after the group occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge for 41 days last winter. Amelia Templeton, a reporter with Oregon Public Broadcasting who has been covering the trial, has the details. 
  • The latest release from Wikileaks shows additional conflicts of interest involving the Clinton Foundation, including how a former Clinton White House aid, Doug Band, worked to obtain flights and payment for Bill Clinton and the Clinton family. Annie Karni, politics reporter for POLITICO, has the details. 
  • Evan Bayh, a former two-term U.S. senator and governor from Indiana, is attempting to win back his Senate seat in the Hoosier State as Republican Todd Young closes in on his lead. Brandon Smith, statehouse bureau chief for public radio station WFYI, brings us the latest. 
  • As Halloween approaches, Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker discusses the feminist horror films you should be watching, and Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new movies hitting the box office this weekend.
  • In the Windy City, does anyone under 50 still speak with a classic Chicago accent? You may find them tonight at the first home game for the Cubs in the World Series. Dennis Foley, author of "We Speak Chicagoese," looks back at the evolution of this distinct accent. 
  • In 1872, Victoria Woodhull ran for president of the United States at a time when women did not even have the right to vote. Her opposition called her "Satan," claiming she belonged in jail. "Mrs. President," an opera in two acts by composer and conductor Victoria Bond, tells Woodhull’s story. Bond, who is currently principal guest conductor of the Chicago Chamber Opera and artistic director of Cutting Edge Concerts New Music Festival, joins The Takeaway today. 


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Life Within War, Secret Tapes, Political Folk Opera

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Oct 27, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Earlier this week in Yemen, attempts to renew a 72-hour ceasefire between Shiite Houthi rebels and the Saudi-led coalition failed — the sixth time such a truce in nation's civil war has been unsuccessful. Adam Baron, a visiting fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations and a journalist who was based in Yemen from 2011 to 2014, has the details.
  • More than 10,000 civilians have been killed in Yemen's civil war, and millions are malnourished or starving because of food blockades. Mohammed al-Asaadi is a father of four living in Sana'a, a rebel stronghold and Yemen's largest city. A former journalist now working in communications for Unicef, al-Assadi describes the burden that war has put on his family.

  • On Wednesday, The Guardian received leaked secret tapes of British Prime Minister Theresa May speaking to Goldman Sachs back in May. In the recordings, she expressed concern over the economic impacts of Brexit. Those remarks go in direct contradiction with how she ran her campaign. Rowena Mason, deputy political editor for The Guardian, explains. 
  • On Election Day, voters in 35 states will weigh in on a total of 163 different ballot initiatives. Many of the initiatives relate are about criminal justice issues. Beth Schwartzapfel, a staff writer at The Marshall Project, gives us an overview of the issues on the ballot. 
  • Last year, Nebraska became the first conservative state to repeal the death penalty in over 40 years. GOP Governor Pete Ricketts has since garnered enough public support and signatures to introduce a ballot measure to overturn the ban on capital punishment. For more on this story we turn to Kate Bolz, a Democratic state senator from Nebraska representing District 29.
  • New York City's Vision Zero initiative aims to completely eliminate pedestrian, bicyclist and vehicular fatalities by 2024. But is this really possible? Peter Norton, an associate professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia and author of "Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City," explains how it could be done. 
  • Ten years before Donald Trump declared his desire to build a wall along the border with Mexico, Vermont-based folk singer Ana?s Mitchell was writing "Why We Build the Wall." It’s the musical hit from her folk-opera "Hadestown," and she joins The Takeaway to talk about how the show has evolved alongside this election.

 



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Native Rights, Challenging the Sharing Economy, American Enlightenment

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Oct 26, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Nearly 130 people were arrested last weekend while fighting the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline, and the Standing Rock Sioux tribe is calling for the federal government to intervene. Here to discuss the recent developments in the pipeline protests and what to expect moving forward is Amy Sisk, reporter with the Inside Energy Public Media collaboration and Prairie Public Broadcasting.
  • Late last week, Renee Davis, a pregnant 23-year-old Native American mother of three, was shot and killed by police while at home on the Muckleshoot reservation. According to data from the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, Native Americans are more likely to be killed by police than any other group. Simon Moya Smith, an activist, citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation, and culture editor for Indian Country Today, explains. 
  • On Friday, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill that would impose steep fines on Airbnb hosts who break local housing regulations, and Airbnb has countered with a federal suit. Nancy Leong, an associate professor at the University of Denver School of Law, has the details on the case at hand.
  • Democrat Catherine Masto and Republican Joe Heck are running neck and neck in the race for Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid's open seat. Joe Schoenmann, the host and senior producer of KNPR's "State of Nevada," brings us the latest on this crucial Senate race. 
  • On the eve of Game 2 of the 2016 World Series, we deliver you a historical audio postcard from the city of Cleveland, from the last time the Indians won the World Series back in 1948. Stephanie Liscio, a PhD candidate in history at Case Western Reserve University and author of the book "Integrating Cleveland Baseball," serves as our guide. 
  • Spartan Race founder and CEO Joe De Sena carries his ambition around with him every day — literally. He carries a kettlebell as a testament to his commitment to the fitness lifestyle he created for people around the country. The author of "Spartan Fit," De Sena joins The Takeaway to discuss his fitness empire.


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Destroying the 'Jungle,' Chicago Memories, Author Jonathan Safran Foer

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Oct 25, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Yesterday in France, many of the estimated 7,000 migrants in the Calais "Jungle" refugee camp packed up their possessions and rolled their suitcases over to a makeshift processing center. It's part of a three day operation to demolish the shacks and tents that make up the informal camp. For details on what's next for these refugees, The Takeaway turns to Caroline Gregory, a journalist and volunteer with Calais Action Lord, and Alf Dubs, a Labour Party peer in the House of Lords and a former child refugee. 
  • According to The Sentencing Project 6.1 million Americans are not eligible to vote because of a felony conviction. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor for The Marshall Project, and Danielle Lang, the deputy director of voting rights at The Campaign Legal Center, describe the case and what's at stake. 
  • Voters head to the polls in just two weeks, and though many will be focused on the results, the actual voting process is often overlooked on Election Day. ProPublica has set out to offer real time analysis of the vote on Election Day, identifying potential problems and offering their findings to news organizations around the country. Derek Willis, news applications developer at ProPublica, explains. 
  • The World Series begins tonight between the Chicago Cubs and the Cleveland Indians. The last time the Cubs won the World Series was 1908. How has baseball and The Windy City itself changed in the last 108 years? Russell Lewis, chief historian of the Chicago History Museum, weighs in. 
  • Nearly 10,000 veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are being ordered to repay large enlistment bonuses of $15,000 or more. Audits revealed widespread overpayment and fraud by the California Guard, but soldiers say paying back these bonuses will pose undue hardship on veterans and their families. Bob D'Andrea, a retired major with U.S. Army Reserve who served in the California National Guard and a current financial crimes investigator with the Santa Monica Police Department, discusses the issues at hand. 
  • The new novel by writer Jonathan Safran Foer, "Here I Am," weaves together stories of faith, marriage, family, and modern life. He's currently a Lillian Vernon Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at New York University, and the author of several over books, including "Everything Is Illuminated" and "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close."


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Breakups Beyond Brexit, Negotiating Peace, Confronting Racial Realities

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Oct 24, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Saturday, AT&T announced that it reached a deal to purchase Time Warner for about $85 billion. If the deal goes through, the merger could establish the biggest media company ever. Jason Abbruzzese, a business reporter with Mashable, explains what this historic deal could mean to consumers.
  • Election Day is about two weeks away, and Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich gives the latest on what you should know before November 8th in his weekly "State of the Race" segment. 

  • South Africa became the second African country — following Burundi — to announce its intention to withdraw from the International Criminal Court on Friday. They are the first and second nations to leave the ICC. Kamari Clarke, a professor of international and global studies at Carleton University, discusses what this could mean for the ICC.

  • Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte is facing a tough re-election race in New Hampshire. A loss in The Granite State would issue a major blow to Republicans in Congress who are hoping to hold on to a majority after the election. Josh Rogers, senior political reporter and editor for New Hampshire Public Radio, gives us the latest. 
  • District attorney elections have historically been relatively uncontested and de-politicized, but this year, with a renewed focus on the criminal justice system, many local voters are seeing the position as a way to effect an immediate change in their communities. Maurice Chammah, a staff writer for The Marshall Project, has the details. 

  • When the historic peace deal between Colombia's government and the FARC failed to pass, many were shocked and scrambled to understand what happened. Jasmine Garsd, a reporter for PRI's Across Women's Lives, visited the "School of Forgiveness and Reconciliation" to learn how victims on both sides of the conflict are trying to move forward.
  • Over the next several weeks and months at The Takeaway, we're going to try to have ambitious and challenging conversations about race, privilege, and identity. We're inspired by Rebecca Carroll, the editor of special projects at WNYC. She's hosting a series called "How I got Over," and we'll be hearing some of those conversations here on The Takeaway. 


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Rigged Elections, Terror at Sea, Wonder Woman at 75

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Oct 21, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • When asked if he would accept the results of the election, Donald Trump says he’ll keep us in "suspense." But how are his claims of a rigged election resonating in countries where corruption is rampant during transitions of power? Michele Dunne, director and senior associate of the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, answers. 
  • On Thursday in an official visit to China, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte formally announced his separation from the United States, in a turn toward China that could potentially undermine years of diplomatic relationship with the U.S. Barbara Demick, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has the details.
  • The Congressional race in California’s 49th district has become unexpectedly tight, as Republican incumbent Darrell Issa faces off against Democrat Doug Applegate. Steve Walsh, a reporter for San Diego public radio station KPBS, explains.
  • Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker fills us in on the nominees for the 2017 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which were just announced this week. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, drops by to review the new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including "Jack Reacher," "Keeping up with the Joneses," and "Michael Moore in Trump Land."
  • For a year and a half, Director Gianfranco Rosi lived in Lampedusa, a small island in the Mediterranean just north of the Libyan coast. He stayed on board Italian warships responding to distress calls from wooden boats full of migrants hoping for a new life in Europe. His experience is told in the new documentary "Fire at Sea," which is out today. 

  • Wonder Woman may be immortal, but she's celebrating her 75th birthday today. As president of DC Entertainment, Diane Nelson oversees a pantheon of iconic superheroes like Batman and Superman. But Wonder Woman, a warrior who values compassion and peace above all, is her favorite DC hero. She joins The Takeaway to examine the evolution of this iconic superhero. 


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The Final Debate, Marriage Discrimination, Nirvana's Krist Novoselic

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Oct 20, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • How did the candidates fare in the third and final presidential debate last night in Las Vegas, Nevada? Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich breaks it all down, and shares reactions from our undecided voters from Florida, Pennsylvania and Ohio.
  • How will the financial resources and networks of ISIS be affected by the operation to liberate Mosul? For answers, we turn to Jonathan Schanzer, a former terrorism finance analyst at the Treasury Department who is now with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies in Washington. 
  • On Tuesday, the Ecuadorian government announced that it had temporarily cut Julian Assange’s internet access at is embassy in London over interference in the U.S. election. David Sanger, national security correspondent for our partners at The New York Times, has the details. 
  • A Louisiana man filed suit Tuesday claiming that the state’s marriage law amended last year violates his constitutional rights after his application for a marriage license was rejected. Mary Yanik, staff attorney for the New Orleans Workers' Center for Racial Justice, explains. 
  • In new regulations announced Wednesday from the Obama Administration, airlines will now be required to refund baggage fees if there are delays in returning luggage to passengers after a flight. The regulations are part of a broader effort to better protect consumers. Barbara Peterson, aviation correspondent for Conde Nast Traveler, examines the new policy.
  • This year marks the 25th anniversary of the release of Nirvana's much-acclaimed album "Nevermind." The group changed the course of music history and paved the way for the next generation of bands. Now, Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic has become one of rock's most politically-minded musicians. In 2005, he joined the board at FairVote, an election reform organization. He joins The Takeaway today to examine the election.


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The Last Undecided Voters, Medical Marijuana, Nick Offerman

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Oct 19, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The last presidential debate of the 2016 presidential race is set for tonight, Both presidential candidates will try to sway the roughly 6% of registered voters who plan to cast a ballot, but remain undecided. We check in with three undecided, registered voters in the swing states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Florida.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko meet today in Berlin to discuss peace in eastern Ukraine. Oleh Rybachuk serves as chairman of the Ukrainian NGO Centre UA, and was formerly the chief of staff to Ukrainian President Viktor Yuschenko. He says it's unlikely this meeting will change Russia's aggressive behavior.
  • In partnership with News Deeply, we bring you a story about how South Africa's reproductive rights work in practice. Dr. Tlaleng Mofokeng joins us to talk about her work as a reproductive rights advocate. She's also a medical doctor specializing in reproductive health at a woman's clinic in Johannesburg.
  • Legalizing medical marijuana has been an ongoing debate for Florida, and in November the state will be voting on the issue once again. Opponents fear the revised amendment on the ballot could cause a drug epidemic, while supporters feel the state must do more to help residents with severe illnesses. We're joined by Jeff Brandes, a Republican state senator of Florida's District 22, who opposed the amendment in 2014. He is now in favor of it.
  • Donald Trump's path to the presidency is narrowing significantly, and he's been claiming election fraud will make him lose. So how common is election fraud and has it ever determined the outcome of a campaign?  Joshua A. Douglas, professor of law at The University of Kentucky, joins us to explain. He's also an election law and voting rights expert. 


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A Push Towards Peace, Bilingual Education, A Hidden Cold War History

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Oct 18, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Tuesday, the U.N. announced that a 72-hour ceasefire will go into effect in Yemen tomorrow night. The nation's civil war has killed more than 10,000 people in the last year and a half, and more than half of the population does not have enough food. Are we seeing the beginnings of peace? For answers, we turn to Kristine Beckerle, a Yemen and Kuwait researcher for the Middle East and North Africa division of Human Rights Watch, and Barbara Bodine, former U.S. Ambassador to Yemen from 1997 to 2001.
  • Plans by a large chain of private Indian colleges to expand into the U.S. have not gone over well in Massachusetts. The state's attorney general, Maura Healey, tells The Takeaway that she is concerned about Amity University's expansion because the college chain is unlicensed and has no track record in the United States.
  • On the California ballot this November is Proposition 58, which would permit public schools to teach in languages other than English, without explicit permission. The move would undo a ballot measure passed 18 years ago that banned bilingual education in the state. Ron Unz, chairman of English for the Children, the organization that sponsored Proposition 227 back in 1998, weighs in on the new ballot measure. 
  • New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has not been seen on TV defending Donald Trump against allegations of unwanted sexual contact from more than a dozen women, and that's because he's been embroiled in a political scandal in his home state. Matt Katz, a reporter for WNYC and New Jersey Public Radio, and author of "American Governor: Chris Christie's Bridge to Redemption," brings us the latest on the Bridgegate trial playing out in The Garden State. 
  • An investigation by FairWarning into Medicare Part D finds that the drug industry is exerting its influence over insurance companies to keep costs high. Part D payments are now expected to rise 6 percent annually over the coming decade per enrollee. Stuart Silverstein, assistant editor for Fair Warning, a California-based nonprofit news organization, has the details.


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Retaking Mosul, Destruction and Tension in North Carolina, Amy Goodman

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Oct 17, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Three Kansas men were charged with conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction on Friday, after federal law enforcement thwarted their plot to detonate a bomb near an apartment complex in Garden City, Kansas, where nearly 100 Muslim immigrants live and worship. Moussa Elbayoumy, the Kansas board chair of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, explains how the Muslim community in his state is coping.
  • We're less than a month away from Election Day. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us to discuss what we might have missed in his weekly "State of the Race" segment. 
  • The city of Mosul in northern Iraq is surrounded by a coalition of fighters aiming to retake the city from ISIS militants. Tim Arango, Baghdad bureau chief for our partner The New York Times, has the details. 
  • Back in the 1970s, a California tax-cutting initiative was a saving grace for homeowners, but it has had lasting effects on the state's budget for decades. Joe Rubin, a producer with our partners at the Retro Report documentary team, examines the complicated legacy of Proposition 13. 
  • We continue our check in on important U.S. Senate races in the lead up to Election Day with a look at the race between Republican Senator Richard Burr and Democratic challenger Deborah Ross in North Carolina. Jeff Tiberii, capitol bureau chief for North Carolina Public Radio, brings us the latest. 
  • It's been a week since Hurricane Matthew devastated parts of Haiti and left a trail of destruction in the Carolinas. Heather Hunt, a research associate with the North Carolina Poverty Research Fund at the UNC School of Law in Chapel Hill, says that some of the poorest areas in The Tar Heel State were hit the hardest. 


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A Military Startup, Comedy Today, Republicans on Rape

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Oct 14, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • How are Republicans are reacting to Trump's sexual assault allegations? We're joined by Charlie Sykes, who's been a conservative talk radio host for 25 years. He believes the G.O.P. is in crisis.
  • The Takeaway's political reporter Todd Zwillich gives us an audio essay on why Trump's "rigged election" is the new birtherism.
  • In our latest installment of "Kids in Prison," a series from WNYC's Sarah Gonzalez, we look at how corrections officers' training and behavior compares between Germany and New Jersey.
  • Culture Reporter Melissa Locker gives us a break from the election with a round-up of new comedy specials from veterans and up-and-comers.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews this week’s big new releases, including "Kevin Hart: Now What?" and "Denial." 
  • The Department of Defense is essentially creating a start-up that will make new, innovative military technologies: MD5 National Security Technology Accelerator. We're joined by Adam Jay Harrison, director of this project, who says that big players in Silicon Valley aren't thrilled with this development.
  • Before the Trump Tapes, FOX Founder, Chairman and CEO Roger Ailes was facing numerous accusations of sexual harassment. Among his accusers was Kellie Boyle, who joins us today to discuss her experience and why it's important for women to share their stories of sexual misconduct perpetrated by powerful men.


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From Meme to Movement, Clinton's Emails, Machine Moderation

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Oct 13, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • This election, memes are creating movements, and "Pussy Grabs Back" is no exception. The image and accompanying hashtag were created in response to vulgar language used by presidential candidate Donald Trump in the recently-released 2005 Trump Tape. As more and more women come forward to claim that Trump groped or assaulted them, The Takeaway talks with Amanda Duarte, a writer and performer who helped create the Pussy Grabs Back meme.

  • In the deep red state of Utah, Hillary Clinton is tied with Donald Trump, and third-party candidate Evan McMullin is polling just 4 points behind the leading candidates. What’s going on in The Beehive State? We hear from Lisa Riley Roche, politics reporter with The Deseret News, Utah's oldest continuously published newspaper, and Independent Presidential Candidate Evan McMullin.
  • On Wednesday, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf stepped down from his position. Last month, it was revealed that the bank would pay $185 million in fines as a punishment for creating nearly 2 million fraudulent accounts in its customers names. Sheelah Kolhatkar, staff writer at The New Yorker, has the details. 
  • Construction has resumed on the 3.8 billion dollar Dakota Access Pipeline that will transport 400,000 barrels of crude oil a day. Over the weekend, a federal appeals court denied the request by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe for an injunction to block construction. Construction may be resuming, but protestors are physically trying to stop it. LaDonna Allard, landowner at site of the Sacred Stone Camp, explains.
  • WikiLeaks continues to release emails from Hillary Clinton's top aides this week, with the batch dropped on Wednesday putting the tally at over 7,000 emails. Julian Assange has promised 50,000 before the election. Annie Karni, a politics reporter for Politico, has been poring over the emails and shares her findings today on The Takeaway.

 



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Politics and Morals, Kids in Prison, A Mission to Mars

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Oct 12, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • After decades of being the party of "family values," has the GOP ceded their moral high ground to the Democrats in this election? Jeet Heer, senior editor of The New Republic, weighs in along with Gabe Lyons, founder of Q, a learning community to mobilize Christians. 
  • After Hurricane Matthew, the situation in Haiti remains dire. The U.N. is seeking $120 million to halt the cholera crisis, which began when U.N. peacekeepers brought the disease to the island nation after the 2010 earthquake, and access to food and clean water is difficult to find. John Hasse, national director of World Vision Haiti, brings us the latest. 
  • As Election Day approaches, we're checking in on key Senate races across the country. We begin in Pennsylvania, where Democratic challenger Katie McGinty is up against Republican incumbent Pat Toomey. Katie Meyer, capital bureau chief for WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, has the details on this race. 
  • Researchers at Texas State University in San Marcos found that police departments in California and Texas had failed to report hundreds of officer-involved shooting deaths as required by laws in both states. Howard Williams, a retired San Marcos police chief and lecturer in the criminal justice division of the College of Applied Arts at Texas State University, explains. 
  • Sarah Gonzalez, a reporter at Takeaway co-producer WNYC Radio, takes you behind the bars of prisons in New Jersey and Germany to examine how minors are treated in correctional facilities around the world. 
  • On Tuesday, in an opinion piece for CNN, President Obama endorsed efforts for humans to reach Mars and return safely to Earth by 2030. Mars and other endeavors will all be discussed tomorrow in Pittsburgh, where the president will host the first-ever White House Frontiers Conference. Jason Kendall, an adjunct professor of astronomy at William Paterson University, explains what life on Mars would really be like. 


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Kids and the Election, Russia Tension, Analyzing 'Locker Room Talk'

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Oct 11, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • How do you teach the election when it has become largely confined to personal attacks that are inappropriate for many young Americans? John Dickson, a history and social science teacher at Monomoy High School in Harwich, Massachusetts, and Joy Bock, an eighth grade social studies in Groveport Madison School District in Columbus, Ohio, weigh in.
  • Over the weekend, a U.S. Navy missile destroyer came under fire by Houthi rebels — it's the first time the Houthi’s have fired on an American vessel since the Yemeni civil war began in 2014. The incident followed an attack on Saturday at a funeral in Sana'a, Yemen's largest city, where more than 100 people were killed. Afrah Nasser, a Yemeni political refugee living in Sweden and a journalist and blogger focusing on human rights, brings us the latest. 
  • After Sunday night’s debate, Russia remains in the spotlight of the 2016 election cycle. Late last week, the U.S. officially blamed Russia for interfering in the election, and Secretary of State John Kerry has called for an investigation into war crimes committed by Russia by the International Criminal Court. Are U.S.-Russian relations at a new low? Maria Snegovaya, a columnist at Russian Business Daily Vedomosti, answers.
  • For many parents, the 2016 election has been difficult to discuss as the language of the campaign becomes less and less appropriate for children. Takeaway listeners from around the country weigh in today on the program.
  • On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a patent dispute between Samsung and Apple. Samsung has already paid $548 million for copying the iPhone’s look, but today it will argue that it should not have to pay $399 million more for infringement of three patent designs. It is the first Supreme Court case involving design patents in more than 120 years. Christine Haight Farley, a professor of law at American University, has the details on this case. 
  • At this point, we've all heard the 2005 tape of Donald Trump and Billy Bush making lewd comments about women on an Access Hollywood bus, footage that has since upended the presidential election. Deborah Cameron, a linguist at the University of Oxford and author of "The Myth of Mars and Venus: Do Men and Women Really Speak Different Languages?", says that men often resort to boasting and sexual aggressiveness when they are alone — language that has consequences beyond the locker room.


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Debate Tension, Preserving Native Languages, Turning Data into Sound

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Oct 10, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Sunday, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump participated in a heated presidential debate hosted by Washington University in St Louis, Missouri. How do Republican women feel about Donald Trump's debate performance and the leaked Access Hollywood video tape? Kim Alfano, a Republican strategist and CEO of Alfano Communications, and Lee Snover, a Republican and former Trump delegate from Easton, Pennsylvania, weigh in.
  • With less than a month before the election, Trump's sexually aggressive and demeaning words about women have put his candidacy — and party — in jeopardy. Caitlin Huey-Burns, national political reporter with RealClearPolitics, discusses the plausibility of removing Trump from the ticket, and how this political fallout might affect down-ballot GOP candidates. Michael Ramlet, founder and CEO Morning Consult, discusses the latest polls after this weekend's video release and last night's debate.
  • In Haiti, more than 1,000 people have died at the hands of Hurricane Matthew, and the country is now in a national state of mourning. Tens of thousands of homes have been destroyed and humanitarian workers say there's an urgent need for assistance. M.J. Fievre, a Haitian-born writer, educator, and author of "A Sky, the Color of Chaos: A Memoir," discusses this crisis.
  • Over 200 indigenous languages are spoken across the U.S. and Canada, but few are taught in schools. As a result, some languages run the risk of extinction. David Baxter, member of the Ojibway Nation and president of Ogoki Learning Inc, created a Native language learning app as a solution. He weighs in today on The Takeaway.
  • How do you transform socio-economic realities into sound? Musician Brian Foo, an application developer for New York Public Library Labs, is experimenting with data sonification by mapping things like coastal loss and household income through simple sounds. 


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Debate Rewind: Live Call-In Special

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Sun, Oct 09, 2016


Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will faced off Sunday night in a 90 minute debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Last night's debate was crucial. Trump has been facing calls from high-level members of the GOP establishment to resign from the race after a 2005 video surfaced over the weekend showing the Republican nominee making vulgar remarks about groping women. 

Trump backers, will you continue to support your candidate in light of his remarks? Republican women — will you vote for Trump? To non-Trump supporters, does the GOP nominee's comments sway your vote towards Hillary Clinton?

Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich took your questions and comments with Lee Snover, a Republican and former Trump delegate from Easton, Pennsylvania.

After the debate, call 1-800-543-2543 to make your voice heard, and tweet us your thoughts @TheTakeaway with the hashtag #DebateRewind. 

 Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear the full conversation.



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The Nobel Peace Prize, Cosplay and Identity, Escaping Syria

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Oct 07, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Hurricane Matthew poses an interesting problem for the 2016 presidential candidates: How do you strike a balance between politics and respect in a swing state like Florida? Kevin Cate, a Democratic strategist in Florida, weighs in.
  • As Hurricane Matthew makes landfall in the states, Haitians are struggling to deal with the wreckage. More than 300 people there have been killed by the storm, and the nation's long-awaited presidential election, which was scheduled to be held on Sunday, has been postponed. Amy Wilentz has covered Haiti for decades. Her latest book, "Farewell, Fred Voodoo: A Letter from Haiti," looks at the country's history, and how it has moved forward since the 2010 earthquake.
  • This year's Nobel Peace Prize winner was announced this morning in Oslo, Norway. The Nobel Committee selected Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos "for his resolute efforts to bring the country's more than 50-year-long civil war to an end, a war that has cost the lives of at least 220,000 Colombians and displaced close to six million people." 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews this week’s big new releases, including "Birth of a Nation" and "The Girl on the Train." 
  • New York Comic Con is underway. The event, which drew 170,000 people in 2015, is one of the biggest destinations for comic book fans and those who engage in "cosplay," the elaborate practice of wearing creative and often homemade costumes. Culture Reporter Melissa Locker reviews the panels that are worth checking out this year, and Takeaway Producer Isabel Angell chats with cosplayers of color about the challenges they face as they become a larger part of nerd culture. 
  • The new documentary "Theo Who Lived" premiers today. The film chronicles the abduction of American journalist Theo Padnos, who was kidnapped by the Nusra Front in Syria in 2012 and held for 22 months. Pandos joins The Takeaway to share his story, and to reflect on the film.

 



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Republicans for the Environment, Fighting for Women, The Next U.N. Secretary General

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Oct 06, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Hurricane Matthew's movement towards the Southeast could be the first real test of a potential sea level rise on the existing infrastructure. Richard Luettich, a professor of Marine Science and director of the Institute of Marine Sciences at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, weighs in.
  • Climate change has barely been mentioned at all in the last two debates. With rising sea levels and potentially devastating storm surges, how do Republican millennials feel about this problem they are likely to inherit? For answers, we turn to Alex Bozmoski, director of strategy and operations at RepublicEn.
  • Yahoo is on the defensive — again — after a report by Reuters alleges that the tech giant developed software to scan Yahoo email accounts at the request of government officials. Kim Zetter, a journalist and author who has been covering cyber security for more than a decade, says this story is still unfolding.
  • A contractor with the NSA has been arrested for stealing and leaking classified secrets. Harold Thomas Martin was employed by Booz Allen Hamilton, an international defense contractor frequently employed by the U.S. government. Scott Shane, national security reporter for our partners at The New York Times, has the details on this story. 
  • Two days after massive protests in Poland over a proposal to ban abortions, the nation's conservative leadership has had a change of heart and says they will not support the law. Agnieszka Graff, a feminist activist and writer in Poland and an American studies professor at the University of Warsaw, explains.
  • Once legally homeless herself, 18-year-old Harvard freshman Nadya Okamoto realized that menstrual hygiene needs are a serious issue among homeless women. So she set out to create a program that would help address the problem. Okamoto, now the founder and executive director of the menstrual hygiene non-profit "Camions of Care," shares her story today on The Takeaway. 
  • The United Nations appointed Portugal’s Ant?nio Guterres as the next U.N. secretary-general with a unanimous vote. Guterres is Portugal’s former prime minister. But some observers are disappointed — many were hoping Irina Bokova, who was among the top three vying for the position, would be elected. She would have been the first female to lead the United Nations. Jean Krasno, a lecturer at the City College School for Civic and Global Leadership and former executive director of the Academic Council on the U.N.system, discusses 


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Hurricane Matthew, Gary Johnson's VP, A Math Disability

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Oct 05, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Hurricane Matthew crossed Haiti yesterday as a Category 4 storm with winds at 145 miles per hour. The island nation was hit hard with heavy rain, flooding, and mudslides. The country is still recovering from the devastating 2010 earthquake that killed 300,000 people and wiped out most of the nation's buildings and roads. Laura Sewell, an assistant country director for the Atlanta-based aid organization CARE, and Nathalie Jolivert, a Haitian architectural designer currently living in New York, weigh in on the storm and Haiti's future.
  • Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us an update and reaction from the first and only vice-presidential debate between Indiana Governor Mike Pence and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine.
  • Not included in last night's vice presidential debate was a 2016 VP candidate who has arguably more political experience than either Mike Pence or Tim Kaine: Bill Weld, governor of Massachusetts from 1991 to 1997, and Gary Johnson's running mate. Gov. Weld joins The Takeaway to share his perspective on the debate and the 2016 election. 
  • Over the last month, inmates across the country have organized the largest prison strike in U.S. history. Now, in what may be a related strike, corrections officers in Alabama are refusing to work. Beth Schwartzapfel, staff writer for the Marshall Project, brings us the latest.
  • Our next president will confront a world being radically reshaped by new technologies. Kara Miller, host and executive editor of the public radio program Innovation Hub PRI and WGBH, examines the tech challenges facing the next president.
  • People of all ages struggle with math, but new research suggests that a "math disability" exists. The disorder, known as "dyscalculia," hypothesizes that individuals may in fact possess a brain abnormality that affects procedural memory, which is responsible for learning and automatized skills. Michael Ullman, a professor of neuroscience and director of the brain and language laboratory at Georgetown University, and Tanya Evans, a postdoctoral research fellow in child psychiatry at the Stanford School of Medicine, explain how this could guide future research.



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Veep Watch, Baltimore Bloodshed, A Remorseful Executioner

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Oct 04, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Where do the vice presidential candidates stand on the issues? Dr. Bob Holsworth, managing principal of Decide Smart and founding director of the Center for Public Policy at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Niki Kelly, Indianapolis Bureau reporter for the Fort Wayne Gazette, weigh in. 
  • How are the vice presidential candidates preparing for the debate? For answers, we turn to Dennis Eckart, a former Ohio congressman and long-time debate coach known for his work with Lloyd Bentsen and Dan Quayle.
  • It was supposed to be the announcement to end all announcements: Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has been teasing a major October surprise ahead of the November election, and many believed that the information would be so damaging to Hillary Clinton that it would change the dynamic of the presidential race. But today, it's clear that Assange had no such plans. Kelly McBride, vice president for academic programs at The Poynter Institute, explains.
  • A year-long investigation by the Baltimore Sun finds that the city is among the most deadly in the country. Justin George, a crime reporter for the Baltimore Sun who oversaw the investigation, examines the uptick in violence. 
  • Baltimore State Attorney Marilyn Mosby gave some new hope for justice when she announced charges against the police officers said to be involved in Freddie Gray’s death. A year and a half later, that promise of justice has fallen flat. Wil Hylton, contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine and author of the article, "Baltimore vs. Marilyn Mosby," looks at the rise and fall of Baltimore's top prosecutor. 
  • Frank Thompson is the former superintendent of the Oregon State Penitentiary where he oversaw and conducted the execution of two inmates. He now works as an advocate against the death penalty, and shares his story today on The Takeaway.


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Rejecting Peace in Colombia, Trump's Tax Scandal, Rethinking School Discipline

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Oct 03, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In a shocking referendum over the weekend, Colombians voted against a historic peace deal signed early last week between the government and the FARC rebels. Nadja Drost, a Bogota-based reporter on assignment for PBS NewsHour, brings us the latest. 
  • This Sunday, a referendum on migration in Hungary drew out millions of voters who oppose the European Union's efforts to relocate migrants within the country. Eva Balogh, founder of the news analysis blog Hungarian Spectrum and former professor of history at Yale, argues that the referendum results highlight the deep anti-migrant sentiment in the country.
  • According to a report this weekend from our partners at The New York Times, leaked copies of Donald Trump's 1995 tax returns show the GOP nominee might not have paid federal income tax for 18 years. Helaine Olen, a money columnist and podcast host for Slate and author of "Pound Foolish," explains.
  • Over 225,000 Syrians have made it to Germany and applied for asylum in the country, and tens of thousands of these refugees live in Berlin alone. Hundreds turned out in Berlin on Saturday to demonstrate against the brutal war in Syria. Journalist Thalia Beaty is in Germany and brings us the latest.

  • After being slapped with a $14 billion penalty by the U.S. Justice Department for behavior surrounding the subprime mortgage crisis, Deutsche Bank is struggling to survive. Stefan M?ller, the CEO of Frankfurt-based research company DGWA, has the details. 
  • The Supreme Court is back in session today, and while the Senate keeps Merrick Garland waiting for a hearing, the high court's eight sitting justices will reconvene to hear a new docket of cases. Amy Howe, a reporter for SCOTUS Blog, fills us in on what we can expect this term. 
  • Scott Michels, a producer with our partners at the Retro Report documentary team, looks at the origin of zero tolerance policies in American public schools, and why more educational institutions are moving away from the practice. 

 



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Entertainer-in-Chief, Radio Love With Delilah, The Life of Robert Gottlieb

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Sep 30, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • "Oslo," a stage play that opened off Broadway, tells the story of the back channel negotiations that led to the Oslo Accords. As former Israeli President and Prime Minister Shimon Peres is laid to rest, we speak J.T. Rogers, the writer and director of "Oslo," about his understanding of this period of peace that Peres helped make possible.
  • On Monday, the government of Colombia and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC, signed a historic peace accord to put an end to the 50 year war between the two groups, which has claimed more than 200,000 lives. It will either become official or will be rejected in a referendum vote this Sunday. Nadja Drost, a Bogota-based reporter on assignment for PBS NewsHour, brings us the latest. 
  • Kurt Andersen, host and co-creator of Studio 360, has had a fixation with Donald Trump that goes back to the very first issue of Spy, the satirical magazine he co-founded 30 years ago. Andersen has put together a special episode of Studio 360 to explore his long-time fixation with Donald Trump, and how reality television and the presidency as performance art has shaped and warped the minds of today's electorate.
  • This week, Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker brings us the latest on President Obama's version of South by Southwest, called South by South Lawn, and Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews this weeks big new releases, including the biographical disaster thriller "Deepwater Horizon," the adventure fantasy film "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children," and the revenge comedy "The Dressmaker."
  • In a new five part series, The Takeaway is exploring trust in American life. In the final installment of our series, we hear from one of the most trusted radio voices, Delilah. She's the go-to relationship guru for eight million weekly listeners, counseling them on everything from how to handle double-crossing boyfriends to surviving long-distance romance.
  • Robert Gottlieb has edited some of the world's best authors while working at the esteemed Alfred A. Knopf publishing house, where he served as president and editor-in-chief before he eventually succeeded William Shawn as editor of The New Yorker. He looks back on his life and work, which has defined the American literary canon, in a new memoir


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Financial Distrust, Obesity Bias, Political Comedy

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Sep 29, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Yesterday, California Treasurer John Chiang announced that the state would suspend all business with Wells Fargo for at least a year, citing the bank's "venal abuse of its customers." Chiang joins The Takeaway today to discuss his decision, and the future of Wells Fargo. 
  • On October 1st, a new law will go into effect in North Carolina that blocks the public from obtaining police body camera or dashboard camera footage. The governor signed the legislation two months ago, well before the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Nancy G. La Vigne, director of the Justice Policy Center at The Urban Institute, has the details. 
  • This week marked the first-ever Arctic Science Ministerial. Convened by President Obama at the White House, a total of 25 Arctic and non-Arctic countries were in attendance to discuss science priorities and advancements in Arctic research. Evon Peter, an Alaskan Native leader and vice chancellor for rural, community, and native education at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, was at the meeting and shares what he learned. 
  • New research shows that obese bias from doctors and healthcare professionals is a persistent issue. Dr. Katherine Saunders, an obesity expert at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, and Patty Nece, a member of the Obesity Action Coalition's Weight Bias Committee, join The Takeaway to discuss how some are working to overcome these stigmas.


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Jerry Springer on Trump, Ethical Food, Redefining Plus-Size Fashion

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Sep 28, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In a new five part series, The Takeaway is exploring trust in American life. Today we turn to Margaret Sullivan, former public editor for The New York Times and a current columnist for The Washington Post. Sullivan examines American trust in the media during an election cycle.
  • What is it about Donald Trump's use of language that connects him with millions of voters? We take a close look with someone who has bridged the gap between politics and entertainment: Jerry Springer, former mayor of Cincinnatti, host of The Jerry Springer Show and The Jerry Springer Podcast.
  • Today, the Senate voted to override President Obama's veto of a bill that will give victims of 9/11 terrorist attacks the right to sue Saudi Arabia. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us the latest from Capitol Hill, and Steve Vladeck, a professor at the University of Texas School of Law, analyzes the consequences of the veto.
  • India is home to more organic farmers than any country in the world, and the country’s Sikkim State is now the first state to grow only organic produce. However, the concept of organic certification is still relatively new in India, and has yet to gain strong consumer support. Amrita Gupta, a journalist based in Bangalore and host of the Food Radio Project podcast, explains.
  • Some 67 percent of American women are considered plus-size, but they only make up 2 percent of the images we see in the media. In partnership with Getty Images, lifestyle website Refinery 29 is launching "Project 67 Percent" in a bid to get a greater variety of body types into the media. Amanda Czerniawski, author of "Fashioning Fat: Inside Plus-Size Modeling" and an associate professor of sociology at Temple University, discusses the so-called "representation gap."


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The Debate of The Century, Protesting Rikers, Trusting the Military

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Sep 27, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • What are the big takeaways from the first debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton? Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich joins the program after a late night of debate coverage.
  • In partnership with The Marshall Project, The Takeaway explores the case of Nathaniel E. Epps. Epps was convicted of rape in 1996 along with his brother-in-law, but new technology and DNA testing has raised questions about his conviction. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor for The Marshall Project, and Olga Akselrod, senior staff attorney for The Innocence Project, weigh in. 
  • Hundreds of activists marched through New York City over the weekend to call for the closure of the Rikers Island jail complex. Today, The Takeaway hears from activists who are working to close the facility. 
  • A case against President Obama's Clean Power Plan will be heard today in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. circuit — 28 mostly Republican states, along with over 100 companies and labor and industry groups, will be fighting to overturn the plan, which was stayed by the Supreme Court back in February. Here to walk us through the case is Jody Freeman, director of the Harvard Law School environmental law program.

  • In his new book, former Secretary General of NATO Anders Fogh Rasmussen argues that the 2016 election is crucial for the future of our role as the "world’s policeman," and that we can no longer take a backseat on the world stage. Rasmussen, the former Danish prime minister from 2001 until 2009, currently serves as the director of Rasmussen Global, a geopolitical and security strategic consultancy.
  • In a new five part series, The Takeaway is exploring trust in American life. According to a June 2016 Gallup poll, more Americans trust the military than any other institution in the country. Retired U.S. Colonel Andrew Bacevich, a professor emeritus at Boston University, explains. 

 



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Debate Anxiety, Terror in Aleppo, Erin Brockovich

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Sep 26, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • This week, our partners at the Retro Report documentary team are taking a look back at the evolution of presidential debates, and how the advent of television has influenced candidates and the people who vote for them. Erik German, a producer with Retro Report, weighs in. 
  • With less than 10 percent of American voters still undecided, the majority of those watching the the first presidential debate will know who they're rooting for, and the stakes are high. Kevin Lonie is a Donald Trump supporter from New Hampshire, and Lisa Hansen is a Hillary Clinton supporter from New Jersey. They're both looking towards the debate with some anxiety, and share their thoughts today on The Takeaway.
  • In the city of Aleppo, "Syrians and Russians seem to be mobilizing to apply [a] kill-all-who-resist strategy" to rebel-held sections of the city, our partners at The New York Times reportAnne Barnard, Beirut bureau chief for The Times, brings us the latest on the deadly onslaught gripping Aleppo. 
  • Back in 2010 when he was just 15-years-old, Jos? Fern?ndez escaped Cuba and was headed towards the MLB. This weekend, the 24-year-old ace pitcher for the Miami Marlins was killed in a tragic boating accident that has rocked the sports world. Luis Hernandez, morning host at public radio station WRLN in Miami, explains how Fern?ndez touched the Cuban-American community. 
  • The golf world is mourning the death of one of the most successful players of any sport: Arnold Palmer died on Sunday at the age of 87 after suffering heart trouble. Cindy Boren, a sports writer for The Washington Post, says Palmer went beyond golf to define the business of sports itself. 

  • Today, Tammany Hall is synonymous with urban corruption and machine politics, the kind that a young progressive reformer named Franklin Roosevelt disdained. But in his book, "Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics," author Terry Golway argues that it is nearly impossible to overstate the dual importance of Tammany and four-term New York Governor Al Smith, Tammany's most beloved son, in understanding Roosevelt's rise and success in New York politics in the 1920s. Takeaway Host John Hockenberry reflects on Golway's work today. 
  • What is trust? Many Americans have lost trust in U.S. institutions, politicians, and the media. In a special five-part series this week, The Takeaway explores what it means to trust ahead of the 2016 election. We begin our exploration with environmental advocate Erin Brockovich.


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Chance Encounters, Black History, Stealing Data

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Sep 23, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Saturday, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture will open after a decades-long fight and countless economic and political hurdles. Gayle Jessup White, community engagement officer at the Thomas Jefferson Foundation, and Don Felder, cousin to the late tennis player Althea Gibson, reflect on this historic moment. 
  • Yahoo announced on Thursday that account information from 500 million users was stolen by hackers in 2014. Data exposed includes names, emails, phone numbers, birth dates, and in some cases security questions. The moves comes as Verizon is in the process of acquiring Yahoo for $4.8 billion. Chris Calabrese, vice president for policy at the Center for Democracy and Technology, has the details.
  • As Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt call it quits, Melissa Locker — culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway — brings us the best break up movies to watch at home, and Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, reviews the new release hitting the box office this weekend, including "The Magnificent Seven" and "Storks."
  • This week, more than 20 governments formally signed on to the Paris climate accord at the U.N. General Assembly. But a group of mayors are pushing to refocus how we tackle climate change. Javier Gonzales, mayor of Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Christian Bollwage, mayor of Elizabeth, New Jersey, explain.

 



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Unrest in Charlotte, Gaming the Election, The Black Prince of Florence

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Sep 22, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Charlotte, North Carolina is the latest American city to find itself at the center of a firestorm after a deadly incident involving police and an African-American man. Brenda Tindal, a historian and senior vice president of exhibits and education at the Levine Museum of the New South, examines the city's history, and the modern crisis facing the people of Charlotte. 
  • Some Republicans are starting to admit that voter ID laws are nothing more than a political tactic to be leveraged against Democrats. Todd Allbaugh, the former chief-of-staff for Republican Wisconsin Sen. Dale Schultz, explains. 
  • On Thursday, voters on the Isle of Man will go to the polls in what will be a pivotal election. Some on the island worry that it has grown too inward looking, and hope that those elected to serve in the House of Keys, the lower chamber of parliament, will help move the self-governing island forward. The Isle of Man's High Court of Tynwald is considered the world’s oldest continuously sitting parliament, established by Viking settlers more than 1,000 years ago. Allan Bell, departing chief minister of Tynwald, weighs in.
  • For the last five years, two architects have been chronicling the physical design of all the parliaments within U.N. Member States in an attempt to understand how architecture influences politics. For details on this initiative, The Takeaway turns to David Mulder van der Vegt, one of the architects who helped chronicled and examine the design of all 193 parliaments within U.N. member states. 
  • In the western world, the so-called "Black Prince of Florence" may have been the first person of color to ever become a head of state. But you've probably never heard of him. Catherine Fletcher, the author of "The Black Prince of Florence," and an associate professor of History and heritage at Swansea University in the United Kingdom, has the details. 


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Stories of Infidelity, Racism in Tulsa, Warren Vs. Wells Fargo

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Sep 21, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Much of America is focused on the death of Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old unarmed African-American who was killed by police officers in Tulsa, Oklahoma on Friday. Buried beneath this story is city's long struggle with racial justice. The Tulsa race riot of 1921 scarred the city with the death of up to 300 people, and ravaged Greenwood, a neighborhood once known as the "Black Wall Street" of Tulsa. Mechelle Brown, program coordinator at the Greenwood Cultural Center in Tulsa, explains.
  • In a new series of essays, writer Jeff Chang explores current movements for racial equality in America, and whether they can succeed in the face of an increasingly polarized dialogue. He joins The Takeaway today to discuss his new book, entitled: "We Gon' Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation."
  • On Tuesday, the U.N. announced that it would suspend all aid convoys in Syria after airstrikes destroyed 18 units attempting to bring aid to areas around Aleppo. Shadi Martini, a former administrator of a hospital in Aleppo and now a refugee and humanitarian worker in the city, discusses the crisis and his experience being resettled in the United States.
  • Yemen is one of the world's most impoverished nations. The destruction of the port city's fishing boats and infrastructure by Saudi-led airstrikes during 18 months of war has deprived the locals of their livelihood, and the U.N. now estimates that about 100,000 children under the age of five in the city of Hodeidah are at risk of severe malnutrition. Iona Craig, an investigative journalist who has covered the conflict in Yemen extensively, explains. 
  • In partnership with News Deeply, The Takeaway speaks with Sonia Narang, education correspondent for News Deeply's Women and Girls Hub, who has reported on the efforts of education activist Neelam Ibrar Chattan, a woman who is working to help Pakistani girls go to school in the Swat Valley.
  • Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf was grilled by the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee yesterday after his company was found to have created nearly 2 million fake accounts for customers. Alexis Goldstein, senior policy analyst for Americans for Financial Reform, joins The Takeaway to discuss the hearing's highlights, and the prospects of further regulation and punishment. 
  • Glennon Doyle Melton is the author of the new book "Love Warrior," which chronicles her struggle with alcohol addiction, her battle with bulimia, and her husband Craig's consumption of porn and affairs with women throughout their marriage. It's an honest, open confession of her life as it fell apart. She joins The Takeaway to explain how as she and her husband dealt with crisis and the pain of his infidelity.



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Being Trans in Hollywood, The Faith Economy, Democracy's Decline

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Sep 20, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Monday, law enforcement officials moved quickly to apprehend 28-year-old Ahmad Khan Rahami. Rahami was captured in Linden, New Jersey in connection with a series of bombings across the Tri-State area. Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School, and Dawn Scalici, government global business director at Thomson Reuters and a former CIA officer, analyze the response to this threat.
  • Yesterday, the Tulsa Police Department released a graphic video of the fatal shooting of Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old African-American who was unarmed and was shot once at close range on Friday by a white officer. It appeared he was moving backwards, with his hands up. Police say he was acting erratically. Matt Trotter, a reporter for KGWS Public Radio Tulsa, has the details.
  • Hillary Clinton addressed a group of young people at Temple University on Monday in an effort to capture the millennial vote that helped bring President Obama's campaign to victory in 2008. It’s a voting block that has been largely ignored but Clinton’s opponent, Donald Trump, according to Caitlin Abber, engagement producer for Public Radio International who has been covering millennials and the election for PRI's "Unconvention" project.
  • While he was accepting an award for his role in the series "Transparent" at Sunday night's Emmy Awards, actor Jeffrey Tambor said that he'd "like to be the last cisgender man playing a transgender woman." Shakina Nayfack, a transgender activist and actress in the Hulu original series "Difficult People," reflects on the role of trans actors in Hollywood. 
  • Is Democracy in decline? Larry Diamond, political sociologist at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, has found that 27 countries have experienced a breakdown in democracy between 2000 and 2015. During the same time period, authoritarian governments have become increasingly emboldened. Diamond shares his findings today on The Takeaway. 


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U.S. Terror Threats, Mexico's Missing, Trotsky in New York

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Sep 19, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Authorities are investigating a number of possible terrorist attacks on American soil, from New York City to St. Cloud, Minnesota. Fred Burton, chief security officer for Stratfor, a global intelligence company, explains what we know so far.
  • U.S. airstrikes mistakenly hit Syrian forces while targeting ISIS over the weekend. The U.S. was quick to come out and admit it was an accident, but Russian leaders seized on the opportunity to suggest that the U.S. was working in the interest of ISIS. Kimberly Marten, a Russia expert and a professor of political science at Barnard College, weighs in. 
  • This election season has been dominated by rhetoric about undocumented immigrants and border control. Something that is less talked about is the U.S.-Mexico drug war, which continues unabated. According to official numbers, some 27,000 people have "disappeared" in Mexico since 2007 because of the drug war. It’s those victims and their families that are front and center in a new documentary airing on PBS. Bernardo Ruiz, director of "Kingdom of Shadows," joins The Takeaway to discuss his new film.
  • Last week, U.S. officials said that Bolivia is among three nations that have "failed demonstrably" to combat the drug trade. But others say the country’s strategy, which includes eradicating unauthorized crops, is working. Kathryn Ledebur, director of the Andean Information Network, has the details. 
  • The U.N. Summit for Refugees and Migrants begins in New York City today as part of the ongoing U.N. General Assembly meetings. Alex Aleinikoff, former U.N. deputy high commissioner for refugees from 2010 to 2015, and Tefere Gebre, a former political refugee from Ethiopia and AFL-CIO's current executive vice president, discuss the continued plight of migrants and refugees.


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Trusting Polls, The Origin of Curious George, Neil deGrasse Tyson

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Sep 16, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • After Hillary Clinton's pneumonia diagnosis, polls show that her lead against Donald Trump is narrowing. The candidates have 52 days to make their case and sway any undecided voters. Michael Ramlet, CEO and co-founder of Morning Consult, a nonpartisan media and survey research company, joins us to discuss the polls and if they're reliable.
  • Yesterday we heard about how up-and-coming downtown Detroit is affecting the surrounding neighborhoods. Today, we'll learn about the downtown itself and the young entrepreneurs featured in the new documentary, Generation StartUp. We're joined by two of those entrepreneurs, Max Nussenbaum and Dextina Booker.
  • The 68th Emmy Awards are on Sunday, and The Takeaway's Culture Reporter Melissa Locker tells us who she thinks is most likely to win. And, which shows are most likely to win in some of our categories: Best Comedy to Watch With Your Cat, Best Drama to Binge Watch With No Break Necessary, and Best Show to Watch With Your Parents that May or May Not Make Things Weird.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new films hitting the box office this weekend, including the new drama with Joseph Gordon Levitt, "Snowden," everyone's next guilty pleasure "Bridget Jones's Baby," and the "Blair Witch Project" reboot "Blair Witch."
  • This Saturday is the 75th anniversary of Curious George - Curiosity Day! On The Takeaway, we're bringing you the story behind the beloved monkey. It's a tale of Nazi's, bike chases and more, all brought to you by filmmaker Ema Ryan Yamazaki. Yamazaki is currently working on a documentary about Curious George's creators, husband and wife duo Margaret and Hans Rey.
  • The Takeaway is thrilled to bring you Neil deGrasse Tyson as he discusses TV, politics and the cosmic perspective. His new book "STARTALK: Everything You Ever Need to Know About Space Travel, Sci-Fi, the Human Race, the Universe, and Beyond," will be accompanying the premiere of the third season of his TV show, "StarTalk", on the National Geographic Channel.


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Policing DNA, Digital Government, "Super Gang" Trial

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Sep 15, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Yesterday in Washington D.C., a group of former top military leaders warned that climate change is a direct threat to military infrastructure and the security of the nation. Here to comment are retired Navy Admiral David Titley, an expert in the field of climate and national security, and Sharon Burke, senior adviser for the Resource Security program at think tank New America.
  • Two years ago, Detroit barely survived the nation's largest municipal bankruptcy ever. Now, the city's downtown is booming with new construction, and some long-time residents in outer-lying, mostly-abandoned neighborhoods feel left behind. WDET’s Quinn Klinefelter reports.
  • The biggest street gang trial in recent history has begun in Chicago. It is expected to include months of testimony that shed new light on the violence plaguing the city. Jon Seidel, Federal Courts Reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times, talks about the Hobos gang and how this trial relates to the rise of gun violence.
  • We teamed up with PRI's radio program American Abroad to host a global town hall discussion about what the world expects to hear from the next president of the United States. Our panelists included Nina Khruscheva, professor of international affairs at The New School, and Michael Oppenheimer, professor of international relations at New York University.
  • Local police jurisdictions have increasingly been creating their own DNA databases, which exist outside of federal regulation. Our guest Frederick Harran is the director of public safety of the Bensalem Police Department in Pennsylvania, and his department began creating a DNA database in 2010. Also joingin us is Stephen Mercer, chief attorney for the Forensics Division of the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, to discuss issues of consent and predictive policing associated with the practice.
  • We're teaming up with our partners at PRI and WGBH's Innovation Hub to explore some of the most pressing innovation challenges that will likely face our future president. Megan Smith, U.S chief technology officer at the White House and a former Google executive, weighs in on the future of digital government and considers how best to harness the power of data for good.


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#BankBlack, This Election's "Baskets," The Reporter With Zika

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Sep 14, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • This summer, a movement called #BankBlack advocated that those protesting police brutality should also move their money to black-owned banks. Teri Williams, president of OneUnited Bank, the largest black-owned bank in the country, says those banks are experiencing a huge boost. Mehrsa Baradaran, professor of law at the University of Georgia, says this is an exciting chapter in the history of black-owned banks.
  • North Carolina may go blue this year and Republicans have been caught off guard. Andy Yates, co-founder and senior partner at Red Dome Group, has been working North Carolina politics for more than a decade and joins us with his analysis.
  • Today, the nation's first and oldest lighthouse station, Boston Light, is turning 300-years-old. We're joined by Sally Snowman, the resident keeper of America's last manned lighthouse for the past 13 years. She is the first female keeper of Boston Light and was married on the island where the lighthouse sits.
  • Hillary Clinton recently called Donald Trump's supporters a "basket of deplorables." Most are saying this was an enormous mistake, but guest Host Todd Zwillich has another take. He argues that all the media attention might be good for Hillary's campaign.
  • While efforts to fund Zika prevention have been crippled in Congress by partisan squabbling, nearly 18,000 infections have been reported by Puerto Rico. Nick Brown, former San Juan Bureau Chief for Reuters, contracted Zika while on assignment there. He says that with so many unknowns it is uncertain how the virus will manifest in his body in the months and years ahead.
  • Having a master's degree in geology was rare for a woman in the 1950s, but that didn't stop Marie Tharp from changing the field forever by mapping the ocean floor. But few people know anything about her because her contributions were overshadowed and hidden by the men she worked with. Hali Felt, creative writing professor at the University of Alabama, wrote a book about Tharp and brings us her story.

 



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Investigating the Trump Foundation, A New United Nations, Paralympic Heros

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Sep 13, 2016


Coming up in today's show:

  • Our guest, Washington Post reporter David Farentholdhas been looking into the Donald J. Trump Foundation for months. What he found? Presidential Candidate Donald Trump stopped giving to his foundation in 2008. And in some cases, he directly profited off charity-related events, or used money from the Trump Foundation for personal or political purposes.
  • The first presidential debate is coming soon, with the candidates busily preparing zippy one-liners  James Fallows is national correspondent for The Atlantic. He joins us to discuss who will win the debates, and if the system is "rigged."
  • We're teaming up with The Marshall Project to bring you a new series about the justice system: Case in Point. This week, we're focusing on the case of William Palmer, asking, "Can a man be convicted of assault if he committed the crime while he was suffering from a brain hemorrhage?" Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at the Marshall Project and author of Case in Point, joins us to shed light on this obscure case.
  • The new United Nations General Assembly starts tomorrow, and we're reviewing some of the issues the global leaders will be facing. First we look at North Korea in the wake of their latest nuclear test. Daryl Kimball, Director of the Arms Control Association, tells us how the international community can effectively respond to the country's concerning activity.
  • Also on the agenda of the United Nations will be the relationship between Russia and Ukraine. Ukraine is currently seeking legal accountability from Russia for the annexation of Crimea as the war on its eastern border continues. William Courtney, former U.S. ambassador to Kazakhstan and Georgia, will tell us about if a peace process is in the works.
  • Life is about to become very different for more than 200 chimpanzees. Last week marked the end of privately funded research on chimps in the U.S., with over 200 of the animals being transferred to a sanctuary. Sarah Baeckler Davis, president and CEO of Project Chimps, talks about the challenges that lie ahead for acclimating the chimps to a more natural way of living, and how this move will affect the research world.
  • Hundreds of female Paralympic athletes are currently competing in Rio, but only one American has won gold medals in both Summer and Winter Paralympic Games. Alana Nichols, a six-time Paralympic medalist, joins us to talk about how the games have changed and how physically disabled athletes can battle depression.


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Cease-Fire in Syria, Native American Rights, From School President to Prison

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Sep 12, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The U.S. and Russia have agreed to join forces against Islamic jihadists in Syria. Their new plan requires a seven day cease-fire in Aleppo and other besieged areas. David Sanger, New York Times national security correspondent, tells us what it was like to be in Geneva as the deal was negotiated.
  • Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have released very little information about their health - less than any other presidential candidate ever. Dr. Marc Siegel, an internist in New York City and Fox News Medical Correspondent, on why more transparency should be required.
  • Concussions in the NFL are giving the top-brass headaches and the players long-term brain damage. The league has introduced new protocols to decrease instances of concussions. Chris Nowinski, co-founder of the Concussion Legacy Foundation, let's us know if the preventative measures actually work.
  • Last Friday, the Obama administration made an unprecedented announcement in support of Native American rights when it temporarily blocked the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Joining us to discuss the impact of this announcement is James Grijalva, professor of Law at the University of North Dakota and the Director of the Tribal Environmental Law Project.  
  • Our partners at Retro Report eulogize conservative icon Phyllis Schlaffy. Reporter Kathleen Hughes discusses how she contributed to the fall of the Equal Rights Amendment lead to the rise of Ronald Reagan, the moral majority and the nomination of Donald Trump. 
  • Connecticut has a problem: Poor schools do dramatically worse than rich schools. Last week, a state Superior Court judge ordered that Connecticut completely overhaul its education system - changing everything from funding, graduation requirements to teacher evaluations. Garth Harries, superintendent of New Haven Public Schools, tells us what the ruling means for his state.
  • Tourrie Moses was once a highly promising student: Good grades, well-liked, even elected president of the student council in eighth grade. Flash forward to today, Moses is currently serving a 15-year sentence for murder in a New Jersey state prison. We talk to one of Moses' teachers, Dan Gills, who is featured in the documentary about Moses, "The One That Got Away". Also, co-producers Steve McCarthy and John Block weigh in on the systemic causes of Moses' experience.


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Airbnb Discrimination, A Public Defender Crisis, The Evolution of Menswear

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Sep 09, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Thursday, Airbnb announced that it would be instituting a new nondiscrimination policy beginning on November 1st in response to months of criticism and a class action lawsuit brought by customers who believe they have been prevented from renting due to race or gender. After he faced discrimination while using Airbnb, Rohan Gilkes founded Innclusive, an alternative housing swap service. Nancy Leong, a law professor at the University of Denver, shares her research on discrimination in the sharing economy.
  • It's been 53 years since the Supreme Court decided that everyone has the right to an attorney, even if they can't afford one. But in a new three-part series, The Marshall Project has found that local jurisdictions are struggling to uphold the Constitution and provide legal defense for indigent defendants. Eli Hager, a writer for The Marshall Project, shares his findings. Rhonda Covington, a public defender in Louisiana, discusses the challenges she faces.
  • Nigeria, Africa’s biggest economy, has experienced two consecutive quarters of declining growth, something that's being pegged to attacks on oil pipelines in the Niger Delta, the falling price of crude oil, and the nation's failure to diversify its economy. Chris Stein, Nigeria correspondent for VOA News, explains.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new films hitting the box office this weekend, including the new action-drama from Clint Eastwood and Tom Hanks, "Sully," the Jerry Lewis drama-comedy "Max Rose," and the animated children's film "The Wild Life."
  • Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker provides a fall music preview and reviews the upcoming albums from from Angel Olsen, M.i.A., Wilco, Against Me!, Dwight Yoakam, Warpaint, How to Dress Well, and Jack White.
  • With Fashion Week underway in New York City, The Takeaway checks in with an often-neglected part of the industry: Menswear. Patricia Mears, the deputy director of The Museum at FIT, gives her take on current and past trends. 

 



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Textile Waste, Uber's Big Data, The Slow Death of Handwriting

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Sep 08, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Wednesday night, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton discussed issues of national security in a candidate forum hosted by NBC news. Though they didn't appear on stage together, they were forced to better outline their foreign policy plans and strategies for defending the nation against terrorism. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich, and Brigadier General Pete Dawkins, a retired veteran who served for 24 years in the U.S. Army, discuss the proposals laid out by Clinton and Trump. 
  • The U.K. announced this week that it will build a $2.5 million, 13-foot wall along its border with France to keep migrants out. Companies that build such barricades say the border wall business is booming, especially when considering the political climate fueled by international migration and Donald Trump. David Aguilar, former deputy commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and former chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, weighs in.
  • Though Donald Trump claims the 2016 election may be rigged against him, records show that he's often donated to candidates who could help him — and the donations were often comprised of amounts that exceed legal limits. In 2013, Trump gave $25,000 to a group supporting Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi just days before The Orlando Sentinel reported that Bondi was considering joining New York's attorney general in suing Trump University. Bill McCollum, Pam Bondi's predecessor in Florida, analyzes the issues at hand. 
  • With Fashion Week underway in New York City, The Takeaway examines waste within the textile industry, and what brands can do to help stop it, with Traci Kinden, founder of Revolve Waste, a consulting group that works with different clothing lines and organizations to reduce textile waste.
  • When you want a car from Uber, but see surge pricing, how likely are you to take the ride anyway? Uber knows what you are likely to do — and how much you’ll be willing to pay. Stephen Dubner, host of Freakonomics Radio, explains.
  • In the digital age, handwriting is becoming an outmoded form of communication, and fewer schoolchildren are being taught how to write in cursive. In her recent essays, Anne Trubek, author of “The History and Uncertain Future of Handwriting,” looks back on the impact of handwriting on culture and argues that the decline and even elimination of handwriting from daily life does not signal a decline in civilization.


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CDC Director on Zika, The Politics of Julian Assange, Helping Women in Congo

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Sep 07, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Members of Congress left for summer recess without approving additional funding to fight Zika. Now, the Centers for Disease Control is running out of money to combat the virus. Dr. Thomas Frieden, director for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses the crisis at hand. 
  • The Senate was scheduled to vote on a $1.1 billion funding package to fight the Zika virus last night, but Democrats moved against the bill, which blocked Planned Parenthood from receiving funding for contraceptives aimed at battling the disease. Zika is sexually transmitted, in addition to being spread by mosquitoes. Can members of Congress reach an agreement? For answers, we turn to Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich.
  • Dr. Chrystelle Wedi was born in the Democratic Republic of Congo and is now working to bring ultrasounds to pregnant women in remote areas of the DRC, along with testing for malaria, HIV, and anemia. She's the co-founder of the Ona Mtoto Wako Project in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and joins The Takeaway to share her story. 
  • On Wednesday, a U.N. body announced that the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe must have a say in the construction of a $3.8 billion oil pipeline that could disturb sacred sites on Sioux lands and affect drinking water. The pipeline would pass through several states, and hundreds of members of the Sioux and neighboring tribes have protested its construction in recent weeks. Stephanie Tsosie, associate attorney at Earth Justice and co-council representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, explains.
  • Last week, WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange promised to release information linked to the Hillary Clinton campaign just before the election. Once considered to be a bastion of transparency by many on the left, the image of WikiLeaks has evolved drastically in this election cycle. Charlie Beckett, director of Polis at the London School of Economics, and Alex Gibney, a documentary filmmaker and director of "We Steal Secrets: the Story of WikiLeaks," weigh in. 
  • On Wednesday, Apple will reveal its latest iPhone. Many expect that the device will be faster, thinner, have a better camera, and could potentially come without a headphone jack. It’s a new gadget that many will rush out to buy, but how are consumers faring in a market monopolized by Apple? Mike Isaac, technology correspondent for our partners at The New York Times, reports.


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Obama's Farewell to Asia, Cross-Border Education, Exonerating an Icon

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Sep 06, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In will what will likely be his last visit to the region as commander-in-chief, President Barack Obama is attending a meeting in Laos for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. He's the first sitting U.S. president to visit Laos, and he is expected to address cluster bomb clean up and human rights violations. Phil Robertson, deputy director for Human Rights Watch's Asia Division, discusses the significance of this meeting, and the challenges ahead.
  • President Obama met with international leaders at G-20 summit — his tenth and final — in Hangzhou, China this weekend. There were positive signs of alliance between the United States and China, but the president's arrival was also rife with controversy and symbolism. Rodger Baker, the vice president of strategic analysis at Stratfor, a geopolitical intelligence firm, analyzes the state of relations between U.S. and China. 
  • Dearborn County, Indiana sends more people to prison per capita than almost any other county in the United States, and a report from our partners at The New York Times finds that about 1 in 10 adults in the county find themselves in prison, jail, or on probation, frequently for drug use. Dearborn County Prosecutor Aaron Negangard is one of the people responsible for this high incarceration rate, and he joins The Takeaway to explain why. 
  • Venezuelan President Nicol?s Maduro faced angry demonstrators over the weekend. Maduro is being blamed for an economic crisis that has resulted in dire food shortages, rising crime, and a lack of basic services and medical care. If a recall vote is held this year, there will be an early presidential election. If the vote is pushed to next year and Maduro loses, the country's vice president will serve the remaining three years of Maduro's term. Are we seeing a slow motion coup? Phil Gunson, a senior analyst for the Crisis Group in Caracas, Venezuela, weighs in.
  • Among the many students heading back to school this fall is Itzel Amacalli Tejeda, a U.S. citizen who she lives in the border town of Juarez, Mexico. In 2013, Tejada began studying at El Paso Community College (EPCC), enduring a daily commute across the border. She did so well she became a Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Scholar, and is transferring her credits to the University of Texas in El Paso. She shares her story today on The Takeaway.
  • Shows like Netflix's "Making a Murderer," and Sarah Koenig's "Serial" prove that good journalism can put pressure on the scales of justice. Matthew Billy, host of the podcast "Between the Liner Notes" is hoping to do just that with a petition to exonerate labor organizer Joe Hill more than 100 years after his execution by the state of Utah.

 



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America and Immigration: An Uneasy Union

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Sat, Sep 03, 2016


Happy Labor Day from The Takeaway! Today, we’re bringing you a special program on immigration. Although it's hard to land on an exact number, there is broad agreement that somewhere north of 11 million undocumented immigrants live in the shadows in the United States.

The political rhetoric about immigrants and refugees has, at times, been ugly and divisive, but today, we share some real stories and solutions for fixing our immigration system. Here’s what you’ll find in today’s show:

  • Back on July 4th, The Takeaway visited Thomas Jefferson’s home in Monticello, Virginia for one of the nation's oldest naturalization ceremonies outside a courtroom (video above). Our small part in the ceremony came at the invitation of “The First Year Project,” which is an effort by some of the nation's leading scholars and thinkers to draw on lessons from history to help the next president navigate their first year in office. It's run by Miller Center for Public Affairs, a presidential think tank at the University of Virginia. With their help, we heard from new citizens, some of whom share their stories today on The Takeaway.
  • In 2016, does America project a welcoming message for immigrants, or are we encouraging them to stay away? Dr. Larry Sabato, a New York Times best-selling author, an Emmy-award winner, and founder and director of the University of Virginia's Center for Politics, was the keynote speaker at the Monticello ceremony, and considers that question today on The Takeaway.
  • The current debate over immigration and mass deportation is making the future uncertain for some people like Andrea Bonilla, a college freshman who grew up undocumented. She’s now able to work legally and live openly thanks to a program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. But the initiative, which was created by President Obama, could come to an end if Donald Trump is elected.
  • Immigration is at the forefront of our political discourse this election year, and in many ways it has been the foundation of Donald Trump's campaign. Elise Foley, politics and immigration reporter for The Huffington Post, discusses the latest on the immigration debate from the campaign trail.
  • At the Monticello ceremony, Takeaway Host John Hockenberry moderated an immigration debate with Daniel Tichenor, Philip H. Knight professor of political science and program director and senior scholar of the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics at the University of Oregon; and David Martin, the Warner-Booker distinguished professor of international law at the University of Virginia. Martin also served as principal deputy general counsel of the Department of Homeland Security from 2009-2010. Today on The Takeaway, you’ll hear key excerpts from this debate, which mirrors the larger discussion currently playing out in America.

Check out some photos from the event below, and click here for John Hockenberry's latest blog on the state of immigration in 2016. 

 



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Repenting for Slavery, Alien Movies, Frank Ocean's "Blonde"

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Sep 02, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Yesterday, Georgetown University apologized for its historical use of slavery, and is trying to make amends by offering preferential treatment in admissions to the descendants of the 272 slaves sold by the university, among other actions. Maxine Crump, descendent of the Georgetown 272, and Craig Steven Wilder, historian at M.I.T., join us to discuss.
  • There's crowdfunding for health costs, movies, new gadgets...and now, lawsuits. It's called litigation finance, and what you do is front some money to pay for litigation costs, and if your party wins you get a slice of the earnings. Maya Steinitz, law professor at the University of Iowa, tells us the incentives for litigation finance can be problematic.
  • Earlier this week, scientists detected a spike in radio signals coming from deep space. Everyone's asking if it could be aliens. The Takeaway's Culture Reporter Melissa Locker is asking, "Have you seen all the awesome movies out there about aliens?”
  • President Barack Obama continues his last trip to Asia advocating for preserving natural resources and halting climate change. David Biello, Science Curator at Ted Talks, joins us to review Obama's track record as a climate-friendly president.


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Trump Visits Mexico, Veterans for Kaepernick, Hip-Hop Brexit

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Sep 01, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • After an impromptu trip to Mexico, Donald Trump went to Phoenix Arizona for a policy speech on immigration. We learned that the wall is still in his plan, and that Trump is taking a very hard line on immigration. Ricardo Perez Gonzalez, a resident of Mexico, and Elise Foley, immigration and politics reporter with the Huffington Post, give us their takes.
  • Obamacare is still a major political issue after several health insurance companies have pulled out of the state exchanges, citing rising costs and fewer people singing up. Larry Levitt, senior vice president for the Kaiser Family Foundation, talks to us about the health of the Affordable Care Act.
  • Brazil just impeached suspended president Dilma Rousseff, and her vice president Michel Temer will be taking her place. Stephanie Nolen, Latin American Bureau Chief for The Globe and Mail, discusses what led to this moment and the future of Brazil
  • Author Laurence Scott joins us to discuss his new book, "The Four-Dimensional Human: Ways of Being in the Digital World." Scott says having a sense of imagination is important to understanding the fourth dimension, and confirms that we still know how to be human.
  •  When San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick sat down during the national anthem before a football game last week, the outcry was instant. An unlikely group is supporting him - veterans. Asha Castleberry was a captain in the U.S. Army, and says Kaepernick's protest spoke to her as a veteran of color.
  • Britain's newly-elected Prime Minister is met with cabinet members on Wednesday to discuss the path to Brexit, and we met with hip-hop artist and Remain campaigner Akala. Akala says this political moment is about more than the next election, it's about a sense of loss that causes some groups to target others.


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