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The Takeaway Podcast by John Hockenberry

The Takeaway Podcast

by John Hockenberry

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A co-production of WNYC Radio and Public Radio International, in collaboration with The BBC World Service, New York Times Radio and WGBH Boston.


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Terror in Manchester, Pleading the Fifth, Graduation Wisdom

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, May 23, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Last night, an explosion tore through an arena in Manchester, England, where pop star Ariana Grande was finishing up a performance. At least 22 people were killed, and more than 50 people were injured. British police are calling it a terrorist incident. Sewell Chan, the London-based international news editor for our partners at The New York Times, brings us the latest. 

  • On Monday, former National Security Adviser Mike Flynn said he will invoke his Fifth Amendment right in order to avoid a Senate Intelligence Committee subpoena requesting documents that could tie him to Russian interference in the 2016 election. We explore the legal justification for this option, and how it relates to the investigation being led by former FBI Director Robert Mueller, with Amy Sabrin, a retired attorney who represented numerous public officials and executives in Department of Justice and congressional investigations.
  • After choosing to visit Saudi Arabia and Israel on his first official foreign visit, President Donald Trump appears to be further isolating Iran during his trip abroad. What is the Iranian view of the president’s Middle East trip? Nahid Siamdoust, a lecturer at Yale's MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies and author of "Soundtrack of the Revolution: The Politics of Music in Iran," weighs in. 
  • Yesterday, the Department of Homeland Security decided to extend Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for more than 58,000 Haitians in the U.S. The Obama Administration originally granted TPS after Haiti’s 2010 earthquake, but the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services recently suggested that conditions have improved sufficiently for Haitians to return home, and is calling for TPS to end. Kenny Azi, a Haitian living under Temporary Protected Status in the U.S., explains why he disagrees with the Trump Administration's determination. 
  • On Tuesday, the White House reveals the 2018 budget. The proposed budget — a fleshed out version of the skinny budget put forth in March — is expected to contain major changes to entitlements, including cuts to SNAP benefits, Social Security’s Supplemental Security Income program, and $800 billion in cuts to Medicaid over the next 10 years, which would affect 10 million people. Jonathan Cohn, senior national correspondent at The Huffington Post, explains what you need to know. 
  • Andrew Cohen, a senior editor at The Marshall Project, and Jessica Van Dyke, an attorney practicing in Nashville, Tennessee, look at Tennessee’s criminal justice system through the case of Thomas Edward Clardy, who was convicted of murder but claims that the evidence was legally insufficient to support his convictions.
  • As students prepare to graduate, The Takeaway examines some of the most popular commencement speeches and what makes them so successful with Cristina Negrut, a software application designer creator of the website Graduation Wisdom.

This episode is hosted by Noel King.



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Trump Takes a Trip, A Foiled Terror Plot, A Teacher's Warning

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, May 22, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • President Donald Trump is on his first official trip overseas. This past weekend, the president was in Saudi Arabia, and today he'll be in Israel before he heads to Rome, Sicily, and Brussels. Ambassador Itamar Rabinovich, former Israeli ambassador to the U.S. from 1993 to 1996, and Steve Eder, an investigative reporter for our partners at The New York Times, look at Mr. Trump's visit to Israel and Saudi Arabia. 
  • According to a group of current and former U.S. intelligence officials, from 2010 to 2012, at least a dozen C.I.A. informants were thrown in jail or killed by the Chinese government. Adam Goldman, a reporter with The New York Times who has been covering this story, has the details. 
  • A whistle-blower at UnitedHealth Group is claiming that big insurance companies have been using Medicare Advantage to profit-game the system in order to be paid more. Fred Schulte, a senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, explains.
  • The chemical chlorpyrifos, which was slated to be banned under the Obama administration but then reversed by President Trump, is responsible for sickening dozens of farm workers in California. Dana Boyd Barr, a professor at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, a member of the scientific advisory panel for the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act that recommended the ban to the EPA, weighs in. 
  • The Takeaway looks into a foiled terrorist plot set to be carried out in Kansas by three members of an anti-Muslim white supremacist group called the Crusaders. Ted Genoways, a contributing editor to The New Republic, investigated the group's radicalization, their plan to bomb an apartment complex comprised of mostly Somali immigrants, and how the town rallied to the defense of these refugees.
  • As students across the country prepare for graduation, Rob Barnett, a public school teacher in Washington, D.C., says that schools are too fixated on graduation rates and passing students to boost their numbers. As a result, real learning has become a secondary goal. 

This episode is hosted by Noel King.



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McCain, Wyden on Trump Turmoil; Internet Equality; Weekend Culture Report

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, May 19, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) appears to be growing more critical of the president in the wake of the investigation into Russian interference in the election and possible collusion with the Trump campaign. Senator McCain joins The Takeaway to discuss the Justice Department’s decision to appoint former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel to lead the investigation. 
  • Democratic Senator Ron Wyden from Oregon serves on the Senate Intelligence Committee and joins the program to respond to the latest string of reports surrounding President Trump and the investigation into Russian influence in the election.
  • On Wednesday night, a jury acquitted Tulsa Police Officer Betty Jo Shelby in the death of Terence Crutcher, an unarmed African-American man who had his hands up when Shelby shot him in September 2016. Mechelle Brown, program coordinator at the Greenwood Cultural Center, explains how the community is responding. 
  • On Thursday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to roll back the net neutrality rules put in place under the Obama Administration in 2015. Michael Copps, former commissioner of the FCC, explains what you need to know. 
  • Iranians are going to the polls today to elect a new president. Current Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, a moderate cleric, is seeking a second term as he faces off against a range of hard-line conservative candidates. Trita Parsi, the founder and president of the National Iranian American Council and the author of "Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran and the Triumph of Diplomacy," weighs in. 
  • President Trump departs for his eight-day overseas trip on Friday, and his first stop will be Saudi Arabia, where the president is expected to deliver a speech on radical Islam, written by aide Stephen Miller. Shadi Hamid, a fellow at the Brookings Institution and author of the new book, "Temptations of Power: Islamists and Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East," discusses what viewers should watch for in the president's speech. 
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, reviews three new web series created, produced by, or starring women, including "Brown Girls," which focuses on interracial friendships; "Eighty-Sixed," a satirical comedy about handling break-ups in the social media age; and "Kate of the Damned," a vampire comedy.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new films hitting the box office this weekend, including the romantic comedy "The Lovers," the children's movie "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul," and the highly-anticipated action film "Alien: Covenant."

 



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Mueller Takes the Wheel, The Legality of Leaks, Chuck Klosterman

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, May 18, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Wednesday evening, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that Robert Mueller, the former director of the FBI, would step in and serve as a special counsel to oversee the investigation into Russian interference in the election. Robert Ray, a former federal prosecutor and independent counsel for the Whitewater investigation, explains how Mueller's appointment could change the scope and timeline of the investigation.

  • Last night, our partners at The New York Times reported that the Trump transition team knew about the DOJ's investigation into Michael Flynn, the president's former national security adviser, before he came into the White House. Karen Tumulty, national political correspondent for The Washington Post, explains how the new revelations about Flynn may change the Russia probe. 
  • Leaks continue to come out of the Trump Administration. Paul Rosenzweig, an attorney, a homeland security consultant, and a professor at George Washington Law School, explores the difference between leakers and whistle-blowers, their legal protections, and whether the practice of revealing information sets a damaging precedent.
  • In recent months, there have been a number of deaths at the Adelanto Detention Facility, a privately run Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facility in Southern California. Robin Urevich, a contributor to the publication "Capital and Main," shares the story of Norma Gutierrez, a 41 year old woman who lost full use of her right arm and leg after suffering from what appears to be a stroke, and was refused treatment at the facility.
  • Many people living in coastal communities worry about sea level rise, inland farmers often fear increasing droughts, and others are concerned about super storms and hurricanes.All of these things have the same root cause: The gradual heating of the atmosphere. In Austin, KUT Reporter Mose Buchele explores how his community is working to cool things down. 
  • In his latest book, author Chuck Klosterman shares a series of essays on culture, sports, relationships, ethics and technology. Klosterman says that the work represents "a portrait of my interior life: I watch games, I listen to music, and I daydream about the rest of reality." He joins The Takeaway to discuss his new work, which is entitled "Chuck Klosterman X."

 



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A White House in Crisis, Inside Immigration Detention, Love Letters to Africa

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, May 17, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • A new report from our partners at The New York Times alleges that President Donald Trump asked former FBI Director James Comey to shut down the federal investigation into National Security Adviser Michael Flynn and his ties to Russia. Michael Schmidt, the New York Times reporter who broke this story, gives us the details on this memo. Byron Tau, a reporter for the Wall Street Journal covering Congress, oversight, investigations and ethics, explains how Congress may respond.
  • Reports now show that the sensitive intelligence on ISIS that President Trump shared with the Russians came from Israel. How are Israelis responding to the news that the president leaked classified information to Russian officials? Dr. Einat Wilf, a former member of the Israeli Knesset and a former Israeli intelligence official, weighs in. 
  • Authorities in Yemen have declared a state of emergency after at least 180 people in the country died from a cholera outbreak. Aid workers estimate that more than 11,000 may be infected. Jamie McGoldrick, a United Nations humanitarian coordinator in Yemen, has the details. 
  • This week, The Takeaway is exploring how immigration detention transformed into a shadow prison system. Today, we go inside one of these facilities, and hear from two detainees: Ralph Alhassani, a detainee at the Bergen County Jail in New Jersey, and Yanet Candelario Salazar is a 39-year-old with dual Canadian-Cuban citizenship. Sally Pillay, the director of First Friends, which has set up a free hotline for people in immigration detention seeking support, also weighs in. 
  • A seasoned war correspondent, Jeffrey Gettleman has covered every major conflict over the past 20 years, from Afghanistan to Iraq to the Congo. For the past decade, he has served as the East Africa bureau chief for our partners at The New York Times, and in his new book, "Love, Africa: A Memoir of Romance, War, and Survival," he discusses his relationship with the African continent. 


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Trump's Meeting With Russian Officials; History of Immigrant Detention; Model Ashley Graham

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, May 16, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • According to widespread media reports, President Donald Trump shared classified information with Russia’s foreign minister and its ambassador during a meeting at the White House last week. A panel of experts joins The Takeaway to discuss.
  • The U.N. Security Council has called for a meeting today to discuss North Korea's recent long-range missile test, which experts are saying is its most powerful one yet. Daryl Kimball, the executive director of the Arms Control Association, explains the weaponry involved.
  • To many Chinese, today's date marks the anniversary of the official start of the Cultural Revolution when, in 1966, Mao Zedong issued the "May 16th Notification," a summary of what would become the ideological justification for the peasant revolution that would last years and claim millions of lives. Beijing-based journalist and author Ian Johnson spoke with Chinese journalist Tan Hecheng, whose new book, "The Killing Wind: A Chinese County's Descent into Madness during the Cultural Revolution," details the bloody massacre of more than 4,500 people in Dao County in the fall of 1967. 


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Comey Firing Aftermath; Ransomware Attack; the Poetry of Pop

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, May 15, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Takeaway lays out a timeline of the conflicting statements and lies emerging from President Trump and the White House surrounding the firing of FBI Director James Comey and the ongoing investigation into possible collusion between Trump and Russia during the campaign. Michael Shear, a reporter for the New York Times, joins guest host Todd Zwillich
  • The massive ransomware attack that hit computer systems across the globe on Friday has been called the biggest ever. Targeting hospitals, telecommunications agencies, and government departments in 99 different countries, it was a reminder of how vulnerable many of the most essential parts of society are to digital viruses. Nuala O'Connor, the president and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology and former Chief Privacy Officer for the Department of Homeland Security, weighs in.
  • Representative Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-N.J.) sent a fundraising letter to the employer of one of his constituents, calling her out as a member of an activist group that opposed him. In other words, it appears that the letter could be a threat. WNYC’s managing editor Nancy Solomon broke the story.
  • Smallpox was one of the deadliest diseases in human history, killing up to an estimated half-billion people in the 20th century alone. The World Health Organization undertook a massive eradication campaign in the 1970s, and officially declared the end of smallpox in 1979. That story and what we can learn from it is the subject of the latest dispatch from our friends at the Retro ReportUmbreen Butt, a producer for Ikana Media and a freelance producer on the documentary, joins us to discuss.
  • Earlier this month, Baltimore Orioles All-Star Adam Jones was in the outfield during a game at Fenway Park, when a Red Sox fan hurled a bag of peanuts at him, yelling racial slurs. A similar incident occurred the next day, this time directed at the woman singing the national anthem. Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation magazine and host of "The Edge of Sports" podcast, says the history of racism in Boston sports goes back decades.
  • KERA’s ongoing One Crisis Away project looks at life on the financial edge. In their latest series, "No Place To Go," they're exploring West Dallas, across the Trinity River from downtown. Since the city built a new bridge, upscale shops, restaurants and apartment buildings have moved in, changing the neighborhood. Now hundreds of residents — who’ve lived in West Dallas for generations — have to move. Courtney Collins, a reporter for KERA, has the story.
  • Whether it's the Beatles or the Stones in the 60s, Devo in the 80s, Tupac in the 90s, or Rihanna today, pop music forms the soundtrack of our lives and generations. But we have a tendency to think of these songs as simply fun rather than meaningful. A new book called "The Poetry of Pop" argues that we should change our tune. Author Adam Bradley, who's also the founding director of the Laboratory for Race and Popular Culture at the University of Colorado, discusses how the history of pop music is closely tied to poetry itself.



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Health Care Reform Heats Up Town Halls; Uprooting Confederate Monuments; Soul Singer Don Bryant

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, May 12, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • A series of town halls across the country this week saw constituents angry about the Congressional efforts to reform health care. We talk to reporters who have attended these meetings, including Frankie Barnhill, a reporter for Boise State Public Radio; WNYC Washington correspondent John O'Connor; and Katarina Sostaric, Eastern Iowa reporter for Iowa Public Radio.
  • Earlier this week, a 20-foot section of tunnel where radioactive waste was being stored at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state collapsed. The accident raises questions about the structural integrity of these locations and the process of cleanup at nuclear weapons sites around the country. Paul Carroll, Director of Programs for Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation, and a former official at the U.S. Department of Energy, weighs in.
  • The Red Bull Music Academy is a world-traveling series of music workshops, festivals, and art installations committed to fostering creativity in music. The events take place over several weeks, and culture reporter Melissa Locker shares a few artists worth checking out, starting with the "prince of soft soul," Patrick Adams. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, joins The Takeaway to talk movies big and small, including the epic medieval flick, "King Arthur: Legend of the Sword," starring Charlie Hunnam. 
  • Legendary Memphis soul singer-songwriter Don Bryant, who wrote for the likes of Al Green and Etta James, released his first album in 1969. Now he's back in his element with a second album, "Don’t Give Up On Love." He joins us for a soulful conversation.


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FBI Fallout Continues; Minnesota's Measles Outbreak; Wheelchair Dancing

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, May 11, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • In the wake of FBI director James Comey’s firing, there have been calls from both sides of the aisle for an independent investigation into the Trump campaign's connection to Russia. U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is among those in favor, and she joins us to discuss her stance.
  • If a special counsel were appointed to investigate Trump-Russia ties, how would that process unfold, and who would take on that role? Robert Ray, former head of the Office of the Independent Counsel, explains.
  • On Tuesday, John Thompson, the director of the U.S. Census Bureau, announced that he would be resigning after 27 years. His announcement came on the heels of a congressional budget allocation that critics say is inadequate. Terri Ann Lowenthal, former staff director of the House oversight subcommittee for the census and now co-director of the watchdog organization The Census Project, explains why the census is important, and what challenges it faces.

  • There are now at least 50 confirmed measles cases in Minnesota, largely affecting unvaccinated Somali-American children. It’s the largest outbreak in the state in more than two decades, and the community is believed to have been targeted by anti-vaccine groups. Kristen Ehresmann, director of the Infectious Disease Division at the Minnesota Department of Health, discusses the outbreak.

  • On Wednesday, three Senate Republicans joined Senate Democrats in a 51-49 vote to block consideration of a resolution to repeal an Obama-era rule requiring oil and gas producers to curb methane emissions from federal lands. The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, has the story.

  • Carina Ho was an active artist in dance and music before she was paralyzed in an accident at the age of 27. She returned to her art with her disability with the AXIS dance company and describes that experience.

  • This week in 1924, J. Edgar Hoover took over the FBI this week, and his tenure as director included a restructuring and expansion that came to define what the agency represents today. A huge part of that legacy was established with the FBI’s handling of prohibition. Beverly Gage, a professor of 20th century American History at Yale University and author of the forthcoming book "G-Man: J. Edgar Hoover and the American Century," takes us on a tour of history.



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Comey's Feverish Firing

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, May 10, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Tuesday, President Donald Trump fired FBI Director James Comey. The White House says it dismissed Comey over the handling of his investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails, but the firing comes in the midst of the FBI’s investigation into President Trump’s campaign and possible collusion with the Russians. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington correspondent, and Paul McNulty, former U.S. deputy attorney general from 2005 to 2007, weigh in. 
  • What are the president's critics saying about his decision to fire Comey? Matthew Miller, a former spokesperson for the Department of Justice under Attorney General Eric Holder, says the principles of independence have been "throughly violated" by the president's actions.
  • Today, the Financial Oversight and Management Board, a non-elected body, determines how Puerto Rico will meet its financial goals. The Takeaway examines the history of Puerto Rico’s economy and how Washington’s policies have shaped the island’s fiscal crisis with Miriam Ramirez, who served in the Puerto Rican senate between 2000 and 2004.
  • On Wednesday, the first of a series of Russian shipments of oil will arrive in Cuba. The Takeaway explores how the former Soviet Union and modern Russia have served Cuba's energy needs with Jorge Pinon, director for the Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy of Latin at the University of Texas at Austin.
  • Cities across the country are discovering a simple way to reduce recidivism rates: Provide people with housing. Last month, New York City placed 97 people in permanent supportive housing to cut overcrowding and save money. Christie Thompson, a writer for The Marshall Project, discusses the ins and outs of the program.
  • With President Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James Comey, is the United States careening towards a constitutional crisis? For answers, we turn to Jeffrey Rosen, a professor of law at George Washington University and president of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.



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Gen. Michael Hayden, The American Bison, Anxious Culture Wars

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, May 09, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Monday, Sally Yates, former acting attorney general, and James Clapper, former director of national intelligence, answered hours of questions from the Senate Intelligence Committee aimed at understanding the links between General Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, and Russia. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what we learned from the hearing, and where we go from here.
  • On Sunday, Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed a bill that would ban sanctuary cities in his state by imposing civil and criminal penalties for localities that don’t comply with federal immigration policies. We hear from law enforcement who are protesting the law. Art Acevedo, the chief of police in Houston, Texas, explains why he is opposed to the law.
  • On Tuesday, South Koreans will choose a leader to replace impeached President Park Geun-hye. The election occurs at a moment of extreme tension between the North and the South.  Tim Shorrock, journalist who has been reporting from Korea for The Nation magazine, discusses the election and the politics at play. He’s also the author of "Spies for Hire: The Secret World of Intelligence Outsourcing."
  • Yesterday, the White House announced 10 judicial nominees for the more than 120 open positions in the lower courts across the country. The Trump Administration also has plans to roll out more nominations over time to fill the 129 vacant judicial seats, which exist in all 11 circuits, including Washington D.C. For details, we turn to Meryl Justin Chertoff , executive director of the Justice and Society Program at The Aspen Institute.
  • Conservation efforts have brought the wild American bison back from the brink of extinction, but this success has also brought some unexpected problems, according to Amy Martin, a journalist who has been reporting on bison in Montana for her podcast "Threshold." 
  • WNYC new podcast, "The United States of Anxiety: Culture Wars,” shines a light on the people who have been battling to shape America’s political culture for decades. In the first episode, WNYC Reporter Arun Venugopal travels to Kansas to speak with the Indian community about how they’re dealing with their changing status in America, and how white supremacy is impacting their community.

 



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A New Day in France, Russian Ripples, The Red State Paradox

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, May 08, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • French voters went to the polls on Sunday and elected Emmanuel Macron as their new president. At 39 years old, Macron is the youngest French leader since Napoleon, and his victory comes after a wild, angry, and unpredictable election season. James McAuley, Paris correspondent, discusses the results and looks at the future of France. 
  • On Monday afternoon, a Senate Judiciary Committee will continue its investigation into the Russian interference in the U.S. election, and will hear testimony from James Clapper and Sally Yates. Anne Applebaum, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, a columnist for The Washington Post, and author of "Gulag: A History," and Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich weigh in.
  • On Saturday, a pitch given to potential Chinese investors by Jared Kushner's sister is bringing renewed scrutiny to a controversial visa program, and to Kushner's conflicts of interests. Noah Bookbinder is the executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a nonpartisan government watchdog group, and a former trial attorney for the Department of Justice’s Public Integrity Section from 1999 to 2005. He joins The Takeaway to break down the ethical conflicts at play in the Kushner family’s business strategy. 
  • A U.S. Navy Seal was killed in combat with the Al Shabaab terrorist group last week. It was the first time an American service member has been killed in Somalia since 1993. Katharine Houreld, East Africa bureau chief for Reuters, explores the U.S. military presence in Somalia, and the threat of Al Shabaab in an increasingly unstable region.
  • On Sunday, 82 girls who were kidnapped in 2014 from the Nigerian town of Chibok were released by the militant group Boko Haram. Some 113 Chibok girls still remain unaccounted for. What’s next for the 82 newly released women, and for those still in captivity? Michael Clyne, a political risk analyst who specializes in African affairs, answers. 
  • Orange County has the highest number of juvenile arrests in the state of Florida, and black boys make up the majority of these arrests. WMFE Reporter Renata Sago analyzed the problem in a new five-part series, and says much of it has to do with Florida’s "direct file" statute, which allows prosecutors discretion to move a wide range of juvenile cases to adult court.
  • Sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild spent five years getting to know people in the Louisiana Bayou. In the lead up to the 2016 election, Hochschild said she found exaggerated evidence of what she calls the "Red State Paradox." She describes the "deep story" in her new book: "Strangers in their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right - A Journey to the heart of Our Political Divide."


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ACA Repeal Marches Forward, The Economics of Faith, Cracking the Fake News Code

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, May 05, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • By a vote of 217 to 213, Republican lawmakers in the House voted on Thursday to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act after years of attempts and campaigning to dismantle the healthcare law. Sarah Kliff, senior policy correspondent for Vox, breaks down what's in the bill, and whether it has a chance to pass in the Senate. Joe Walsh, a former congressman and a nationally syndicated radio host, says that not all conservatives are celebrating. 
  • French voters will head to the polls on Sunday. Marine Le Pen, the far right leader of the National Front, will square off against centrist and political novice Emmanuel Macron. But many working-class French citizens are frustrated, and are considering staying home this weekend. James McAuley, Paris correspondent for The Washington Post, explains.
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, reviews the TV series that returning or premiering in the coming weeks, including "Master of None," "House of Cards," "Twin Peaks," and "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt."
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including "Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2" and "Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer." Rafer also discusses the film teaser for the highly anticipated action movie "The Dark Tower."
  • On Thursday, President Donald Trump signed an executive order, “Promoting Free Speech and Religious Liberty," which eases IRS restrictions on political activities by religious groups. Micah Schwartzman, professor of constitutional and first amendment law at the University of Virginia Law School, and co-editor of the book "The Rise of Corporate Religious Liberty," has the details. 
  • Fake news sites are often associated with the far right and efforts to get President Trump elected, but recent analysis has found a proliferation of fake news sites originating from sources on the left. Jeff Green, the CEO of Trade Desk, an internet advertising company that was recently commissioned by CBS to investigate who is reading and sharing fake news online, explains the political trends in the phenomenon.

This episode is hosted by Todd Zwillich.



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The Shift: Exploring America’s Rapidly Changing Workforce

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, May 04, 2017


The Takeaway is in San Francisco, California for a special broadcast from public radio station KQED. During this special broadcast co-hosted by Takeaway Host John Hockenberry and Queena Kim, the senior editor of KQED's Silicon Valley Desk, we'll explore our changing labor market, and some innovative proposals that will help our society through this transformation. Here's what you'll find in today's show:

  • Around the country, technology and innovation is changing the present and shaping the future of America's labor market. A trip to a Lowe’s hardware store in California's Bay Area shows this shift well. Kyle Nel, head of Lowe’s Innovation Labs, has been developing the "LoweBot" (photos below), which helps customers navigate their way around this massive store.
  • Eric “Rick” Hanushek, an economist and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institute at Stanford University, explains what the future of the labor market looks like, which jobs might be lost to automation, which jobs will be under-filled, and what that means for the future of the U.S. economy.
  • We’re already living in a world where humans and machines are working side by side. But at an Amazon fulfillment center in Tracy, California, workers have a mixed view on automation. The Takeaway talks with these workers, and with tech expert Michael Chui, a partner at McKinsey & Company.
  • If economists believe jobs will disappear due to automation, what should the United States do? Some have suggested that America introduce a guaranteed basic income — the the idea that everyone should receive a regular, unconditional paycheck. Natalie Foster, who studies and advocates for a universal basic income as the co-chair of the Economic Security Project, explains. 
  • In several corners of the world, non-profits and governments are introducing guaranteed basic income. Marjukka Turunen, head of the legal affairs unit of Kela, Finland’s social security bureau, explains how this Nordic country is experimenting with basic income. The Takeaway also hears from two people who could benefit from a guaranteed basic income: Christina Scardino, a former NUMMI plant autoworker, and Jay-Marie Hill, a musician and community organizer.
  • What happens to society when the labor market makes a dramatic shift? Joanna Reed is a sociologist and lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley, where she studies the sociological impact of work. And she says the value of the dollar isn’t the only measure of a hard day’s work in this country.


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Turmoil in Venezuela, Caring for Our Vets, Nixing School Nutrional Standards

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, May 03, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Major protests are expected in Caracas, Venezuela today, following a decree issued by embattled President Nicol?s Maduro that calls for a "people’s body" to rewrite the Constitution. Miami-Dade County Commissioner Jose Pepe Diaz says greater action on the part of the U.S. is necessary, and has called for the federal government to impose tougher sanctions on Maduro's government. Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, director for the Latin American region at Greenmantle LLC, a macroeconomic and geopolitical advising firm, explains how the country descended into violence and instability.
  • President Donald Trump is praising U.S. automakers for investing hundreds of millions of dollars and creating hundreds of job in Michigan. In a special investigation from The Takeaway’s Rockefeller Resilience Project, reporter Quinn Klinefelter with public radio station WDET examines the role of autoworkers — a group whose resilience is being tested by reality.
  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture now plans to roll back school lunch standards that are related sweetened milk, sodium, and whole grains, among other things. Margo Wootan, director of nutrition policy at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, explains. 
  • Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is set to speak to the State Department today. It's the first time he will address the agency since assuming his post in February. There have been reports that the agency is functioning at a very limited capacity, and Tillerson has planned further cuts in staffing and a 26 percent reduction to the budget. For a look at the future of the State Department, The Takeaway turns to Robert Berschinski, former deputy assistant secretary of state for Human Rights for the Obama Administration.
  • In partnership with the American Home Front Project, Bobbie O'Brien, a reporter and producer covering veterans and military affairs for public radio station WUSF, looks at the struggles encountered by military caregivers, who are mostly spouses and parents.
  • Chicago has already seen more than 1,000 victims of gun violence this year. In an effort to explore the gun violence epidemic, public radio station WBEZ has launched a new series called "Every Other Hour," which was named for the frequency of shootings in the Windy City. Alex, a former gang member, was just 13 years old when he shot a man in the chest. He shares his story today on The Takeaway. 

This episode is hosted by Todd Zwillich



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The Next Chapter for ACA Repeal, A U.S. Territory in Crisis, The Gun Violence Epidemic

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, May 02, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • President Donald Trump has promised a new push to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, and the vote could come as early as this week. We explore the key issues with the new healthcare bill with Mary Agnes Carey, partnerships editor and senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, and Dr. Carolyn McClanahan, a physician and a financial planner who advises on health care policy.
  • President Trump has pushed the H-1B temporary guest worker visa program back into the spotlight with a recent executive order that aims to surface “Buy American” and “Hire American” policies. Some in Congress have long called for reforms to the H-1B lottery program, including Democratic Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois. He weighs in today on The Takeaway. 
  • Last night, Puerto Rico missed a deadline to craft a debt deal after the government was unable to reach an agreement with bondholders, and now lenders are suing the U.S. territory. D?nica Coto, a reporter and editor for the Associated Press based in San Juan, has the details. 
  • Over the weekend, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdo?an fired nearly 4,000 more public officials as part of an escalating crackdown on dissent and free expression. The government also blocked access to Wikipedia. Mahir Zeynalov, chief editor of The Globe Post, explains what you need to know. 
  • Over the weekend in Dallas, 15-year-old Jordan Edwards was shot and killed by police through the passenger’s side window of a vehicle. Officers reported that they heard gunshots when responding to a call of drunken teenagers. Nomaan Merchant, a correspondent with the Associated Press based in Texas, gives us the latest on this story. 
  • Chicago has already seen more than 1,000 victims of gun violence so far this year. In an effort to explore the gun violence epidemic in Chicago, public radio station WBEZ has launched a new series called, "Every Other Hour," which is how often someone got in the city over the past 15 months. Jaime, a 19-year-old former gang member, explains how he first got involved in gang violence in Chicago as a young teenager.

This episode is hosted by Todd Zwillich



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Sanctuary Cities Fight Back, May Day Movements, The Origins of Conspiracy Theories

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, May 01, 2017


Coming up on today's show: 

  • Last week, a federal judge in San Francisco blocked President Donald Trump's plan to punish so-called "sanctuary cities." Leon Fresco, a former deputy assistant attorney general at the Justice Department and the former head of the the Office of Immigration Litigation under the Obama Administration, has the details on the ruling and what it means for cities around the nation. 
  • Though San Francisco is home to the federal judge who dealt President Trump another legal blow, the debate over U.S. immigration law marches forward in the Bay Area. KQED Reporter Marisa Lagos analyzes the shifting history of sanctuary policies in San Francisco, which has become a microcosm for current sanctuary city rhetoric. 

  • California isn’t the only state resisting the policies of the Trump Administration. Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson rose to prominence when he moved to block the president’s travel ban, but Ferguson has also emerged as a consumer advocate, targeting predatory student loan practices and embracing the power of the office of the attorney general. He weighs in today on The Takeaway. 
  • Today is May Day or International Workers' Day, which commemorates the 1886 Haymarket Affair, when 200,000 workers organized a nationwide strike in support of the eight hour workday. In 2006, the day became a rallying point for immigrants, and immigration has again become a rallying point in the Trump era. Peter Linebaugh, a historian and author of "The Incomplete, True, Authentic & Wonderful History of May Day," discusses the history and future of of International Workers' Day. 
  • Last week, President Trump announced that May 1st would be celebrated nationwide as "Loyalty Day." Many of his critics were quick to attack the declaration as yet another alarming example of the president's nationalism. But it turns out that the origins of Loyalty Day dates back to the Eisenhower Administration. Nicole Hemmer, an assistant professor in presidential studies at the Miller Center, a columnist for Vox.com, and co-host of the podcast Past Present, joins The Takeaway to help place Loyalty Day into a wider historical context. 

  • The moon landing was faked. 9/11 was an inside job. In this age of alternative facts and the 24 hours news cycle, conspiracy theories have a deep hold on America. How did it all begin? Jennifer Oko, a journalist with the Retro Report documentary team, looks back at the evolution of conspiracy theories in the United States. 
  • In the latest installment of The Takeaway's "Uncomfortable Truths" series, Adriana Rodriguez, a high school student from the Bronx, talks with her aunt Nancy Lopez, a laundromat owner in Queens, about how skin color plays a role in privilege, and discrimination within their Dominican family and their community in New York City.


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Mixed Reviews for Trump, A Shifting War Front, Remembering the L.A. Riots

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Apr 28, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • How are Trump supporters assessing the president’s first hundred days in office? Kevin Lonie, a salesman from Manchester, New Hampshire, and Shirl St. Germain, a retiree in Marco Island, Florida, discuss President Trump's progress, and what they'd like to see change. 
  • Kraig Moss packed up and joined the Trump campaign last fall as a supporter and traveling musician. Now Moss, who lost his son three years ago to a heroin overdose, feels disillusioned by the president he helped to elect. He weighs in today on The Takeaway. 

  • Yesterday, the Pentagon announced that two American service members were killed in action Wednesday night. The Taliban presence in Afghanistan has also grown significantly in recent months, and is raising questions about the protracted American presence in the country. Carlotta Gall, North Africa correspondent for our partners at The New York Times author of "The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014," explains.
  • After losing more than 10 million subscribers in recent years, ESPN laid off around 100 journalists and on-air personalities this week. Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation magazine and host of "The Edge of Sports" podcast, discusses changing face of ESPN, why they're losing money, and how their cuts reflect the larger state of sports journalism. 
  • Every Friday, Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, drops by to review the big new releases hitting the box office. This week, Rafer reviews the new sci-fi thriller "The Circle," which stars Tom Hanks and Emma Watson, and the action-drama "Sleight," starring Jacob Latimore and Dul? Hill.
  • Saturday is the 25th anniversary of the start of the L.A. Riots, which broke out after the Rodney King verdict and lasted for nearly a week. John Ridley, Academy Award-winning screenwriter of “12 Years a Slave,” showrunner for the ABC drama, “American Crime,” and director of the new film “Let It Fall: Los Angeles 1982-1992,” discusses the L.A. riots and the current state of race-relations in America. 
  • Filmmaker Sacha Jenkins is releasing “Burn, Motherf*cker Burn,” a documentary that provides a comprehensive look at the 1965 Watts riots, and how the uprising was similar to that of the L.A. riots. He discusses his film, and what needs to happen for the emotions that sparked the riots to change.

The Takeaway needs your help! Please visit wnyc.podcastingsurvey.com and tell us a little about you and the podcasts you love in a five-minute, anonymous survey. We really appreciate your help — knowing more about you helps us make more of the shows you enjoy. Thank you from all of us at The Takeaway!

 



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Trump's Tax Test, A Hunger Strike, Fusion Folk and Pop

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Apr 27, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Wednesday, the Trump Administration unveiled an outline of the president's tax plan, which calls for slashing the corporate tax rate and cutting taxes for most Americans. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum and former Congressional Budget Office director under George W. Bush, provides an analysis of the plan. 
  • Former Democratic Maine Senator and Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell speaks to Takeaway Host John Hockenberry about President Trump’s first 100 days in office, and why healthcare has become an impossible legislative feat in Congress.
  • Republican lawmakers in the House appear to be close to establishing a compromise bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act — a plan that could appeal to moderates like the "Tuesday Group" and satisfy conservatives in the Freedom Caucus. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details. 
  •  Thousands of people are in the streets of Venezuela demanding new elections and protesting food and medical shortages. Hannah Dreier, Venezuela correspondent for The Associated Press, discusses the growing intensity of a nation crumbling before her eyes.
  • Some 1,500 Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails have undertaken a hunger strike to protest the conditions of their captivity. Julie Norman, a research fellow and director of education at the Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security, and Justice at Queen's University Belfast, just ended a month long investigation inside Israel and Palestine, and joins The Takeaway to discuss the hunger strike. 
  • Indie pop band Sylvan Esso is out with a new album, "What Now." The album, which drops this Friday, was made in 2016 and grapples with the chaos of a country looking inward. Amelia Meath and Nick Sandborn, the singer and producer for Sylvan Esso, discuss their creative process today on The Takeaway. 

The Takeaway needs your help! Please visit wnyc.podcastingsurvey.com and tell us a little about you and the podcasts you love in a five-minute, anonymous survey. We really appreciate your help — knowing more about you helps us make more of the shows you enjoy. Thank you from all of us at The Takeaway!



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Northern Trade Troubles, Second Language Success, An Ethical Quagmire

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Apr 26, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Days after the Trump Administration announced that it would impose a 20 percent tariff on lumber imported from Canada, the president took to Twitter to criticize America's neighbor to the north. For look at the escalating trade tensions between the U.S. and Canada, The Takeaway turns to Armine Yalnizyan, an economist and business commentator for the CBC, and Ira Shapiro, former chief U.S. trade negotiator with Japan and Canada, and general counsel in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative during the Clinton Administration.
  • On Tuesday, a federal judge blocked the Trump Administration's plan to cut funding for so-called "sanctuary cities." The president vowed to take the fight to the Supreme Court. Though the road ahead is unclear, the city of Minneapolis is looking to calm immigrants and refugees. Minnesota Public Radio's Brandt Williams explains.
  • Thanks to a growing immigrant population, more than 80 languages are now spoken in schools in the city of Buffalo, New York. Nadia Nashir, assistant superintendent of multilingual education for the Buffalo City School District, explains that a team of multilingual staffers is trying to ease the transition.
  • A once bustling manufacturing town, the city of Buffalo was hit hard by deindustrialization and a population decline that saw residents flocking to the suburbs. Today, the city is experiencing a rebirth that is driven largely by an influx of immigrants and refugees. Eva Hassett, executive director of the International Institute of Buffalo; Larry Christ, chief operating officer of the lighting manufacturer Litelab; and Ayla Abyad, a Syrian architect living in Buffalo, explore how immigrants are working to revitalize and rebuild the city. 
  • Arkansas is moving ahead with planned executions this week, despite concerns about the medical ethics of the lethal injection cocktail. Dr. Sandeep Jauhar, a cardiologist and author of the books "Intern" and "Doctored," and a contributing opinion writer at The New York Times; doesn't believe in the death penalty. However, he argues that the American Medical Association's objection to doctor participation in death penalty executions improperly discourages physicians who are trying to minimize prisoner suffering.

The Takeaway needs your help! Please visit wnyc.podcastingsurvey.com and tell us a little about you and the podcasts you love in a five-minute, anonymous survey. We really appreciate your help — knowing more about you helps us make more of the shows you enjoy. Thank you from all of us at The Takeaway! 



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The 100 Day Dash, Protecting the Great Lakes, Dangerous Dissent

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Apr 25, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • This weekend, Donald Trump will cross the 100-day mark of his presidency. Does it make sense to judge a president in the first 100 days? Where did this practice come from, and what do the first 100 days tell us about the future direction — or success — of a presidency? Alexis Coe, a historian and co-host of the podcast "Presidents are People Too," and Julian Zelizer, a political historian at Princeton University and a contributor to CNN, weigh in. 
  • Across the Great Lakes region, people are paying close attention to President Trump's proposed budget, which could eliminate $300 million in annual funding for clean up across the Great Lakes. Dave Rosenthal, the managing editor of Great Lakes Today, explains what the cuts could mean to the region.  

  • The federal government could shutdown this weekend if lawmakers can't come to an agreement on $1.4 billion in funding for the president's border wall. Kyle Dropp, co-founder and chief research officer of Morning Consult, explains how citizens view government shutdowns, and how they’ve impacted voting patterns in the past.
  • Arkansas executed two convicted killers on Monday night after attorneys claimed that the first execution was botched. It's the first double-execution to be carried out in the nation since the year 2000. Tom Meagher, deputy managing editor at The Marshall Project and the website The Next to Die, which tracks scheduled executions across the country, explains what you need to know. 

  • Across the world, advocates for human rights say we are facing a crisis: A crackdown on dissent. Are our rights to peaceful assembly and protest in danger? Olga Sadovskaya, deputy chair of the Committee Against Torture, a human rights organization providing psychological and legal assistance to torture victims in Russia, weighs in. 
  • For someone to be convicted of a murder, a murder had to happen. But what happens when the medical examiner gets it wrong? That's the subject of our latest installment of our "Case in Point" series with The Marshall Project. Andrew Cohen, senior editor at The Marshall Project, and Jennifer Bukowsky, an attorney in Columbia, Missouri, discuss the case of Jessie McKim.

The Takeaway needs your help! Please visit wnyc.podcastingsurvey.com and tell us a little about you and the podcasts you love in a five-minute, anonymous survey. We really appreciate your help — knowing more about you helps us make more of the shows you enjoy. Thank you from all of us at The Takeaway! 



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Political Fortunes in France, Turning Weapons Into Art, Cracking Down on Dissent

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Apr 24, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Following months of buildup, French voters went to the polls on Sunday during the nation's first round of presidential voting. The field of 11 candidates has now been narrowed down to two: Far-right firebrand Marine LePen, and political novice and centrist Emmanuel Macron, who will face off in a runoff race on May 7th. Jean-Marie Pottier, editor-in-chief of Slate France, analyzes the results and explains what you should expect going forward. 
  • Bernard-Henri Levy is a French public intellectual, and the author of "The Genius of Judaism." He joins The Takeaway to discuss the turbulence surrounding the French elections, and the role of anti-Semitism and Islamophobia in France.
  • Artist Lin Evola has a mission to melt down all of the weapons in the world — tools used to destroy — and create something new out of them: Art. She's the founder of the Peace Angels Project, which has transformed handguns, machine guns, and even tons of decommissioned nuclear weapons into sculptures of peace.
  • Congress is back from recess, and is facing a government shut down at the end of the week. This week, President Trump may unveil his tax reform plan, and a new healthcare bill from Republicans may be introduced. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what you need to know. 
  • On Thursday, an Egyptian-American who was woman detained in the country for nearly three years was released and flown back to the United States, following a request by President Trump during Egyptian President el-Sisi’s visit to the White House earlier this month. The Takeaway explores the current dynamic between the U.S. and Egypt with Michael Wahid Hanna, a senior fellow at The Century Foundation.
  • Around the world, advocates for human rights say we are facing a crisis: A crackdown on dissent. Are our rights to peaceful assembly and protest in danger? Yara Sallam, director of the criminal justice program at the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, weighs in. 

The Takeaway needs your help! Please visit wnyc.podcastingsurvey.com and tell us a little about you and the podcasts you love in a five-minute, anonymous survey. We really appreciate your help — knowing more about you helps us make more of the shows you enjoy. Thank you from all of us at The Takeaway!



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Marching for Science, Terror and Politics in Paris, Mozart in Cuba

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Apr 21, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Ira Flatow, host of PRI's Science Friday, is in Washington D.C. for the March for Science, a protest demonstration scheduled to take place this Saturday in support of evidence-based research and decision making in government. Flatow joins The Takeaway to talk discuss the expectations and criticisms of the march, and the issues the science community wants to draw attention to. 
  • When it comes to fighting climate change, some Republicans are siding with environmentalists. The Green Tea Party is fighting for a more environmentally friendly GOP. Debbie Dooley, president of Conservatives for Energy Freedom-Green Tea Coalition, weighs in. 
  • On Thursday night in Paris, a gunman killed a police officer and seriously wounded two others in what French President Francois Hollande has called a terrorist attack. The first round of French presidential elections will take place on Sunday. James McAuley, Paris correspondent for The Washington Post, explains how this incident could shape the nation's voting process. 
  • Late Thursday night, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against a stay of execution for Arkansas death row inmate Ledell Lee, who was put to death by The Natural State shortly before midnight. This is the state's first execution since 2005. Lee, 51, was sentenced to death in 1995 for the murder of his neighbor, Debra Reese. Sarah Whites-Koditschek, a reporter for Arkansas Public Media, has the details. 
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, discusses the long-running series "Doctor Who." She explains why it's not too late to start watching the program, and some of the basics you need to know about the new season.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new films hitting the box office this weekend, including the action-comedy "Free Fire," the historical dramas "The Promise" and "The Lost City of Z," and the DisneyNature documentary "Born in China."
  • Artist and pianist Simone Dinnerstein has been working with the Havana Lyceum Orchestra to perform two Mozart concertos. They are releasing an album today called "Mozart in Cuba." The Takeaway hears from Dinnerstein before youth orchestra travels to the United States in June.


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Ethics Questions Reach Ivanka, The Future of Fox, World Cannabis Day

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Apr 20, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Ivanka Trump's businesses have prospered since she assumed the role of First Daughter. What conflicts of interest does this pose for her and the Trump Administration? Erika Kinetz, an Associated Press correspondent in Shanghai, and Ambassador Norm Eisen, Obama White House Ethics Czar from 2009 to 2011, answer. 
  • South Florida has become the rehab capital of the U.S. as the addiction recovery industry booms. As WLRN’s Peter Haden reports, many battling opioid and heroin addiction have made their way to South Florida, and it’s having an impact on EMTs and other health infrastructure.
  • Massive protests are expected across Venezuela today as calls to oust President Nicol?s Maduro continue. Anatoly Kurmanaev, a Wall Street Journal reporter in Caracas, has the details. 
  • On Wednesday, 21st Century Fox formally announced that anchor Bill O’Reilly would not be returning to Fox News Channel in light of ongoing complaints of sexual harassment within the network. Bob Garfield, co-host of WNYC’s On the Media, examines the future of Fox News without its biggest star. 
  • On World Cannabis Day, Ricardo Baca, founder of the news and culture website The Cannabist and a marijuana columnist for The Daily Beast, looks at the state of the legal and medical marijuana industries in the United States, and how it will fare under the Trump Administration. 

The Takeaway needs your help! Please visit wnyc.podcastingsurvey.com and tell us a little about you and the podcasts you love in a five-minute, anonymous survey. We really appreciate your help — knowing more about you helps us make more of the shows you enjoy. Thank you from all of us at The Takeaway!



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Comics and Identity, The Korea Question, Michigan Water Woes

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Apr 19, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • While Flint residents wait, Nestle extracts billions of dollars worth of groundwater from West Michigan, but it pays the state just $200 a year to do so. Now, the company wants to increase its pumping operation in the region. Liz Kirkwood, executive director of FLOW, a Great Lakes water law and policy center, has the details. 

  • Former Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez reportedly committed suicide in prison early Wednesday morning. Prison officials in the Souza Baranowski Correctional Center in Shirley, Massachusetts, discovered Hernandez hanged in his cell. Michele Steele, a reporter for ESPN, reflects on Hernandez's life and death. 
  • Today, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the case of Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Inc. v. Comer, which tests the limits of religious freedom, and all eyes will be on newly-confirmed Justice Neil Gorsuch. Greg Stohr, Supreme Court reporter for Bloomberg News and co-host of Bloomberg Law, explains what you should expect. 

  • Though Richard Glossip was sentenced to death in Oklahoma for the murder of a motel owner in 1997, he has maintained his innocence. Now, the new documentary from director Joe Berlinger, "Killing Richard Glossip," investigates the case and the death penalty.
  • The sixth edition in Marvel’s Black Panther series, co-authored by Ta Nehisi Coates and Rembert Browne, will be released today. Browne, a former writer for Grantland and New York Magazine, wrote the character of Kasper Cole, who uses the alias Black Panther, and joins The Takeaway to discuss the comic and his creative process. 


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Trump Heads to Wisconsin, A Dying Ecosystem, The Urban-Rural Divide

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Apr 18, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • For the first time since the November election, President Trump will make a visit to Wisconsin today — a state he won by just 20,000 votes. How are voters in The Badger State feeling about the trajectory of the new administration? Anthony Zito, a 34-year-old car salesman in LaCrosse, Wisconsin; Matthew Olson, a 33-year-old dairy worker in Ellsworth, the Cheese Curd Capital of Wisconsin; and Sherwin Hughes, host of "The Forum" on radio station WNOV and Democratic political consultant, weigh in.
  • Australia's Great Barrier Reef is now said to be in its final "terminal stage" following back-to-back dying events and widespread bleaching caused by global climate change. For a look at the consequences of this dying ecosystem, we turn to Fabien Cousteau, an aquanaut and environmental advocate, and founder of the Fabien Cousteau Ocean Learning Center.
  • On Tuesday, Georgia’s 6th Congressional District holds a special election to replace former U.S. Representative Tom Price. There are 18 candidates in the race, but a young Democratic candidate could turn the district blue for the first time since 1979. Bill Nigut of Georgia Public Broadcasting weighs in.
  • With narrow results in elections and referendums in Turkey, Britain, and the U.S., what's shaping the political divide between urban and rural areas? Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group, answers.
  • Clement Attlee has often fallen into the shadow of Winston Churchill, but Attlee, who led Britain's Labour Party from 1935 to 1955 and served as Britain’s prime minister from 1945 to 1951, was hugely influential in shaping the United Kingdom, according to John Bew, a professor at King's College London and author of "The Man Who Made Modern Britain."


The Takeaway needs your help! Please click here and tell us a little about you and the podcasts you love in a five-minute, anonymous survey. We really appreciate your help — knowing more about you helps us make more of the shows you enjoy. Thank you from all of us at The Takeaway!



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The Era of Erdo?an, Tension in the Korean Peninsula, Simplifying the Tax System

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Apr 17, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Following months of buildup and growing international concern, the Turkish people headed to the polls on Sunday and voted by a slim majority to consolidate power under President Recep Tayyip Erdo?an. Patrick Kingsley, a correspondent in Turkey for our partners at The New York Times, discusses what the results mean going forward. 
  • Turkey continues to arrest, detain, and disappear thousands of dissidents who pose a challenge to President Erdo?an’s rule. For a look at Turkey's human rights crisis, The Takeaway turns to ?ebnem Korur Fincanci, president of the Human Rights Foundation of Turkey who is facing terror-related charges for taking part in a free speech campaign, and Dr. Vincent Iacopino, the medical director at Physicians for Human Rights.
  • On Sunday, Vice President Mike Pence arrived in Seoul, South Korea, hours after North Korea carried out a failed missile launch. Jean Lee, a global fellow at the Wilson Center and former AP bureau chief for the Korean Peninsula, joins The Takeaway to examine the escalating tension between the United States and North Korea. 
  • This week, the Retro Report documentary team looks into the history of the lobotomy, and how it led to the much-improved psychiatric neurosurgery of today. Producer Barbara Dury explains that the lobotomy was billed as a miracle cure for mental illness, but instead left patients and families devastated. 

  • On Friday, an Arkansas judge halted the scheduled executions of seven death row inmates. The executions were supposed to be carried out over the next 11 days because the state's supply of the controversial drug Medazolin is set to expire at the end of the month. Sarah Whites-Koditschek, a reporter for Arkansas Public Media, has the details. 

  • Americans will spend more than six billion hours preparing to pay their taxes this year. Why is the U.S. tax filing process so costly and so time consuming? T.R. Reid, author of the book “A Fine Mess: A Global Quest for a Simpler, Fairer, and More Efficient Tax System,” explores how the United States could streamline the tax filing process.  
  • The latest installment of The Takeaway's “Uncomfortable Truths” series brings listeners to Minneapolis, Minnesota. Residents Jessica Shryack and Tiffany Wilson-Worsley explain how their friendship developed across racial lines, and how they broke down cultural perceptions about black and white women. 


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The White House Power Struggle, Festival Previews, The Drama of History

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Apr 14, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Thursday, the Trump Administration dropped the largest non-nuclear bomb in the American arsenal on an Islamic State cave complex in Afghanistan. The unprecedented move came on the heels of an airstrike in Syria, which killed 18 coalition allies. Paul McLeary, Foreign Policy's senior reporter covering the U.S. Defense Department and national security issues, has the details. 
  • There appears to be a power struggle within the Trump Administration. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explores the expanding role of Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law, and how his influence is shaping the president's relationship with Stephen Bannon.
  • Beginning next week, Arkansas plans to execute seven inmates on death row over the course of 11 days before the state's lethal injection drugs expire. Critics are calling the process cruel and unusual punishment, and are fighting to stay the executions. Tom Meagher, deputy managing editor at The Marshall Project and the website The Next to Die, which tracks scheduled executions across the country, explains what you need to know. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews this week’s big new movie releases, including the action sequel "The Fate of the Furious," the science-fiction comedy "Colossal," and the British drama "Their Finest."
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, gives a festival season preview right before she heads out to Coachella. Headliners at this year's festival includes Radiohead, Lady Gaga, and Kendrick Lamar.
  • At the end of March, reports began surfacing from human rights workers and a Russian opposition newspaper that hundreds of gay men were being arrested, beaten, and disappeared by authorities in Chechnya. The nation's leader, Ramzan Kadyrov, has refused to comment on the allegations, despite a multitude of reports. Tanya Lokshina, director of the Russia program for Human Rights Watch, has the details. 
  • "Oslo," a new play by J.T. Rogers, opened this week on Broadway. It tells the behind-the-scenes story of the back channel negotiations that led to the Oslo Accords. The Takeaway hears from Rogers, and Bartlett Sher, director of the play, and Mona Juul, Norwegian Ambassador to the U.K.

 



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ICE Doubles Down, A Contraceptive Crisis, The Anime View of the World

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Apr 13, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Earlier this week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions doubled-down on tough Trump-era immigration policies. John Sandweg, former acting director and acting general counsel of Immigration and Customs Enforcement from 2013 to 2014, says the administration may be biting off more than it can chew.
  • On Thursday, the United Nations Security Council will vote on whether to close its 13-year peacekeeping mission in Haiti. If the vote passes, the U.N. will remove more than 2,000 troops in favor of a smaller operation. Jacqueline Charles, Haiti correspondent for the Miami Herald, has the details.
  • The Philippines may completely run out of contraceptives as soon as 2018. Ana P. Santos, a journalist and Pulitzer Center grantee based in Manila, says the nation's instability and politicized battle over access to reproductive care is putting women's health in jeopardy. 
  • In East Asia, power games are putting North Korea's neighbors at risk. On Wednesday, Japan announced a plan to send destroyers to the East China Sea along with a U.S. Navy supercarrier, the U.S.S. Carl Vinson. Lindsey Ford, director for security programs at the Asia Society Policy Institute, discusses Japanese concerns in the midst of rising North Korean aggression.


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Admiral Mike Mullen, Passenger Rights, Women's Hockey Scores Gold

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Apr 12, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The White House's positioning against Russia has been varied in the days since the Syrian sarin gas attack and President Trump's subsequent response. The Takeaway explores the dynamic between Syria, Russia, and the United States, and the future of American involvement in the Syrian Civil War, with Admiral Mike Mullen, the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.
  • Outrage continues to mount over a viral video of a United Airlines customer being dragged off an overbooked flight. What kind of rights do passengers have at every step of the flying process — from the airport, to the security line, to the tarmac, and in the air? Joseph LoRusso, an aviation attorney and licensed pilot with LoRusso & LoRusso, answers. 
  • One third of high school juniors in Ohio are in danger of not graduating on time. New graduation requirements are more demanding than the old Ohio graduation tests, and educators are calling for a change in requirements. Matt Jablonski, an American history teacher at Ohio's Elyria High School, has the details. 
  • In February, famine was declared in two counties in South Sudan. Now, as fighting and ethnic killings increase, five more counties are also about to descend into crisis. How is the world’s youngest country already facing such devastation? Jeffrey Gettleman, East Africa bureau chief for our partners at The New York Times, weighs in. 
  • A new book focuses on an overlooked part of the migrant crisis: The smugglers and traffickers who earn billions of dollars. Peter Tinti, author of "Migrant, Refugee, Smuggler, Savior," and his-coauthor spent years researching and reporting in the field to better understand how smuggling and trafficking networks have evolved and adapted, and he shares his findings today on The Takeaway.
  • After putting their careers on the line by threatening a boycott of the World Championships over unequal pay and a lack of support, the U.S. Women's National Hockey Team took home gold in the championship game with an overtime win against Canada on Friday. Three members of the U.S. Women's National Hockey team — Kendall Coyne, Amanda Kessel, and Meghan Duggan — discuss their victories on and off the ice. 


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Predatory Lending, An Alabama Shake Up, Enduring Police Reforms

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Apr 11, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Student loan companies like Navient are being accused of using predatory lending practices. Now, the attorneys general in Illinois and Washington and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau are fighting for bad loans to be forgiven. Betsy Mayotte, director of consumer outreach and compliance at the non-profit group American Student Assistance, explains.
  • Mohamad Ali, the CEO of Carbonite, and Kara Miller, the host of WGBH and PRI's "Innovation Hub," explore how the Trump Administration's immigration and travel restrictions are impacting the tech world, including Carbonite's ability to recruit and retain foreign born talent, and the broader economy.
  • In a move to avoid impeachment, Alabama Governor Robert Bentley resigned on Monday after facing charges of corruption, and a salacious affair with one of his key advisers. John Archibald, a columnist for AL.com and the Alabama Media Group, which publishes The Birmingham News, Huntsville Times, and Mobile Press Register, has the details on this scandal. 
  • On Tuesday, Kansas' 4th Congressional district will hold a special election to replace former Representative Mike Pompeo, who was tapped by President Donald Trump to lead the CIA. Republican state treasurer Ron Estes is competing against Democrat Jim Thompson, an attorney, and Independent Chris Rockhold. Though the race hasn't been as close as other special elections, a recent influx of Republican spending suggests that it may be more competitive than anticipated. Deborah Shaar, a reporter at Wichita public radio station KMUW, weighs in. 
  • Susan King was wrongly convicted of murder in Kentucky in 2006. She spent over six years behind bars and is now the plaintiff in a federal civil rights case against the detective she alleges framed her. Along with King, Andrew Cohen, senior editor at The Marshall Project, explain the case and shine light on a little known type of plea deal, the Alford Plea, which has provided the foundation for the civil rights case. 
  • In 1997, Pittsburgh became the first city to sign a consent decree, offering a lesson in what works, and what doesn't, in reforming police departments. Pittsburgh's consent decree expired in 2002, and Sheryl Gay Stolberg, domestic affairs correspondent for The New York Times, explores which reforms endured.


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Trump's Mid East Strategy, A Quest for Identity, Beyond Standing Rock

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Apr 10, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • From ISIS to Syria and Egypt, where does U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East go under the Trump Administration? Is a hands off approach the only way to avoid further destabilizing the region? Former U.S. Ambassador Alberto Fernandez, who served as a U.S. foreign service officer from 1983 to 2015, and Leslie Vinjamuri, an associate professor in international relations at University of London, weigh in.
  • How will the Supreme Court behave with the addition of Judge Neil Gorsuch? Dahlia Lithwick, who writes about the Supreme Court and the law for Slate and hosts the "Amicus" podcast, examines the cases coming before the court that could be affected by his confirmation. 
  • Under the leadership of Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, the Tent City jail was opened in 1993 when Maricopa County jails faced overcrowding. The outdoor camp where prisoners live is sweltering in the summers, but newly-elected Sheriff Paul Penzone says that it is no longer necessary now that most of the county jails are less than three-quarters full. Jimmy Jenkins, a reporter for KJZZ in Phoenix, Arizona, explains. 
  • For nearly two decades, Lisa S. Davis thought she was a victim of identity theft. Traffic violations and criminal misdemeanors kept appearing under her name as she tried to rent cars, renew her driver's license, and apply for jobs. She searched for the culprit and found another Lisa S. Davis, in the same state, with the exact same birth date. Lisa Savoy Davis, a personal trainer in Brooklyn, and Lisa Selin Davis, a writer in Brooklyn, share their story today on The Takeaway. 
  • Months after thousands demonstrated on the prairies of North Dakota, the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline is now complete, and oil will start flowing through it any day. Inside Energy, a collaborative public media journalism initiative, has produced an hour-long documentary called "Beyond Standing Rock" to showcase the tribal fights over energy development. Leigh Paterson, a reporter for Inside Energy and producer and narrator for new documentary, weighs in today on The Takeaway. 

 



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The U.S. Attacks Syria, Police Reform Under Trump, The Value of Libraries

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Apr 07, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The United States has responded to the Syrian government's use of chemical weapons with targeted airstrikes. "It is in this vital national security interest of the United States to prevent and deter the spread and use of deadly chemical weapons," President Donald Trump said from his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida on Thursday. Missy Ryan, a Washington Post correspondent covering the Pentagon, military issues, and national security, and Josh Gilbert, a senior science fellow at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, weigh in.
  • A judge in Baltimore, Maryland denied an attempt by the U.S. Justice Department to delay a public hearing in the city to address police reform and a proposed consent decree. Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh, who has been in office since December 2016, joins The Takeaway to discuss what happened at the hearing yesterday, and how the city's approach is an example for other cities undergoing police reform amidst the Trump Administration.  
  • Founded in 1848, The Boston Public Library was a pioneer in library services in the United States. It has since worked to adapt to the digital age under the leadership of library President David Leonard. He explains how libraries can work for the public in the 21st century.
  • With the increasing challenges of fake news, what role can librarians play when it comes to seeking out the truth? Mike Barker, the director of academy research, information and library services at Phillips Academy, and Gosia Stergios, associate director of academy research at Phillips Academy, think there should be a network of librarians working across the country as fact checkers, and that they could even assist platforms like Facebook, Google, Twitter, and others.
  • Sana Mustafa, a Syrian refugee who arrived in the United States in 2013, and Rana Shanawani a refugee from Syria who arrived in the U.S. in 2011, weigh in on the crisis in their homeland and the American airstrikes against the Assad regime. 



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Trump's Dance With China, The GOP Goes Nuclear, Appropriating the 'Resistance'

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Apr 06, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Chinese President Xi Jinping will visit President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort on Thursday and Friday. President Xi is looking to elevate his status at home and will stand strong on issues like trade and North Korea, but President Trump has said he is willing to handle North Korea without China’s help. Isaac Stone Fish, a senior fellow at the Asia Society and a former Newsweek correspondent in Beijing, explains what you should expect.
  • In an unprecedented measure on Thursday, Republicans voted to change a Senate rule that requires 60 votes to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich says this rule change could have enormous consequences.

  • On Wednesday, the National Security Council removed Stephen Bannon, President Trump's chief strategist, from the Principals Committee, which is typically reserved for high level cabinet officials. Shannon Green, former senior director for global engagement on the National Security Council, discusses the significance of Bannon's removal. 
  • Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey is one of a number of attorneys general in blue states that are pushing back on the Trump Administration’s agenda on a range of issues. She joins The Takeaway to explain why she opposes the president's travel ban, and the administration's position on immigration. 
  • Not everyone in the blue state of Massachusetts is against President Trump’s policies. Thomas Hodgson, the sheriff of Bristol County — located about 50 miles south of Boston — recently called for the leaders of sanctuary cities to be arrested. He weighs in today on The Takeaway. 
  • In Massachusetts, two of the state’s poorest communities have filed lawsuits challenging the president’s executive order that threatened to strip federal aid to sanctuary cities. Elizabeth Ross, The Takeaway's producer at public radio station WGBH, reports that these suits could offer a blueprint for other small sanctuary communities looking to challenge President Trump’s immigration agenda.
  • In a new investigation, The Center for Public Integrity found that dozens of the companies that received federal contracts had violated federal wage laws in the past. Maryam Jameel, labor and environment reporter for The Center for Public Integrity, has the details.
  • An ad featuring Kendall Jenner standing with protesters and offering a Pepsi to a police officer has sparked outrage among individuals offended by the company's appropriation of the Black Lives Matter movement, and the use of a white woman to do so. But this is just one ad among many that have sought to capitalize on the “resistance” in order to connect with consumers. Dustin Lonstreth, chief marketing and strategy officer at CBX, a brand agency in New York City, explains. 


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Brutality in Syria, Harassment at Fox, The Future of Library Design

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Apr 05, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • A day after a suspected chemical attack killed scores of people, a major conference on Syria is kicking off in Brussels. Six years into this brutal war that has left hundreds of thousands dead and millions displaced, what can the international community accomplish? For answers we turn to Robert Ford, former U.S. ambassador to Syria from 2011 to 2014, and currently a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute in Washington D.C.
  • Louisa Loveluck, Middle East correspondent for The Washington Post, has reported extensively on Syria and has documented systematic torture within the walls of military hospitals in Syria. She's conducted dozens of interviews and shares first-hand testimony of Mosen al-Masri, a detainee and survivor of torture inside a hospital known simply as 601.

  • Senate Democrats are vowing to filibuster the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, and Republicans are promising to invoke the "nuclear option" to change the rules once more. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington correspondent, brings us the latest on the showdown from Capitol Hill.
  • Matthew Smith is one of the youngest conductors to lead a 75-piece orchestra. He debuted this weekend at the Nottingham Royal Concert Hall, where he led a performance of Johann Strauss’ operetta Die Fledermaus. Along with Derek Williams, a conductor and his teacher, 11-year-old Matthew Smith weighs in today on The Takeaway. 
  • What works and what doesn't when it comes to designing libraries and other cultural buildings? Author and Architecture Critic Sarah Williams Goldhagen joins The Takeaway to discuss public libraries and the future of design. 
  • In early April 1994, the government of Rwanda embarked on a campaign of genocide, killing more than 800,000 people and raping up to 250,000 over the course of 100 days. A new documentary called "The Uncondemned" tells the story of a group of lawyers who sought to make rape a crime of war. Michele Mitchell, director, writer, and producer of the film, and Pierre Prosper, lead attorney on the Rwandan genocide rape case and the first lawyer to try rape as a war crime, weigh in. 

 



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Kremlin Concerns, MLK's Stand Against Vietnam, Evangelicals in America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Apr 04, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Monday, a terrorist attack on the St. Petersburg metro shifted the spotlight to national security after weeks of domestic unrest across Russia. In recent weeks, thousands of Russians have gathered in cities across the country to protest the government of Vladimir Putin. Joshua Yaffa, a contributor to The New Yorker and a fellow at New America, discusses the growing agitation in Russia.
  • Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich talks to Senator Mark Warner (D-VA), the vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, about the ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the election.
  • There are two closely-situated landfills in St. Louis County, and one has radioactive waste and the other has a smoldering underground fire that's been burning since 2010. A lawsuit has been filed as concern among residents grows, and it's still not clear whether the state or the county is ultimately is responsible for the area. Eli Chen, science and environment reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, brings us up to speed on this issue.  
  • It's election day in St. Louis County. Jason Rosenbaum, a political reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, gives us a roundup of what's on the ballot, including public funding for a new stadium, funding for the police department, and mayoral elections in Ferguson and St. Louis. 
  • Today is the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Riverside Church speech. During the address, Dr. King came out strongly against the Vietnam War for the first time, over strenuous objection from nearly everyone around him. The Takeaway looks back at King's speech and his legacy. 
  • In the latest installment of The Takeaway's series "Uncomfortable Truths: Confronting Racism in America," St. Louis Public Radio Reporters Kameel Stanley and Tim Lloyd talk about their experiences reporting about racial issues, class, power, and poverty in the St. Louis area for their podcast, "We Live Here."
  • A new book called "The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America" traces the Evangelical movement from the 18th century to today. Frances FitzGerald, a Pulitzer Prize winner and author of "The Evangelicals," weighs in today on The Takeaway. 


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Inequality in the Trump Era, Scientific Censorship, Singing the Blues in St. Louis

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Apr 03, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Friday, the Trump Administration disclosed the financial statuses of its top officials, and the disclosure once again calls into question the interests of the administration. Steven Fazzari, a professor of economics and sociology at Washington University in St. Louis, joins The Takeaway to discuss where income inequality might be going under President Trump. 
  • A year and a half after the Ferguson Commission released their "Forward Through Ferguson" report, some activists say the city hasn't made enough changes. Amy Hunter, manager of diversity and inclusion for St. Louis Children's Hospital and a long-time activist from Ferguson, weighs in. 
  • Last night, South Carolina won their first NCAA Women's Basketball Championship, and tonight in the men's bracket, it's a battle against two No. 1 seeds. Mechelle Voepel, a columnist for ESPNW and ESPN.com, looks at the win by the lady Gamecocks, and explains what to expect from Monday night's game. 

  • Victoria Herrmann, managing director of The Arctic Institute, a Gates Scholar at Cambridge University, and a National Geographic Explorer, has found that under the Trump Administration, her citations are being deleted. She discusses the consequences of scientific censorship today on The Takeaway. 
  • Police and students clashed over the weekend in Caracas, Venezuela — authorities are trying to quell both domestic and international outcry after the Venezuela Supreme Court seized power from the National Assembly last week, effectively dissolving the elected legislature. Carolina Acosta-Alzuru, a journalism professor at the University of Georgia and a native of Venezuela, examines this growing political crisis.
  • It's been a year since the National Blues Museum in St. Louis opened its doors. The Takeaway tours the museum and talks to some of St. Louis' best blues artists, including Dion Brown, founding executive director of the National Blues Museum; Charles "Skeet" Rodgers, one of St. Louis' best blues musicians; and Uvee Hayes, a St. Louis-based blues and soul singer.


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Fighting for LGBTQ Equality, The Vet-to-Cop Pipeline, Fresh Iranian Food

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 31, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • North Carolina lawmakers have voted to repeal the state's controversial HB2 "bathroom bill." The state's Democratic governor is likely to sign the repeal, but LGBTQ advocates say the bill still allows for discrimination, and does not represent a victory. Deb Butler, an LGBT legislator and a Democrat representing District 18 in the North Carolina House of Representatives, explains why she is against the bill. 
  • Under the Trump Administration, two significant federal surveys have removed questions about sexuality, which is raising concern among LGBT advocates who believe important information is being denied to the federal government. Michael Adams, CEO of the group Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), weighs in. 
  • One in five police officers is a veteran, but law enforcement agencies do very little mental health screening for cops who return from military deployment. For details on this issue, The Takeaway turns to Simone Weichselbaum, a staff writer with The Marshall Project, and William Thomas, a longtime police seargant in Newark, New Jersey, and a veteran suffering from PTSD.
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, recently ventured down to Cuba for a quick getaway. She discovered Cuban protest music from the past and present, and shares some of her favorites tunes today on The Takeaway.
  • Every Friday, Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, drops by to review the new releases hitting the box office. This week, Rafer reviews the sci-fi action flick "Ghost in the Shell," the animated children's film "The Boss Baby," and the war dram "The Zookeeper’s Wife."

  • The weakening of the European Union, fueled by Brexit, will likely be a boon for Russia as it tries to influence European elections and the European bloc. James Nixey, head of the Russia and Eurasia program at Chatham House, explains. 
  • The Iranian New Year, Nowruz, ends on Sunday. The 13th day is known as Sizdah Be-dar. Louisa Shafia, an Iranian-American chef and author of "The New Persian Kitchen," shares some her favorite recipes, and discusses the significance of this year’s holiday.

 



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A Repeal and Replace Double Take, #BlackWomenAtWork, Alaska's Hidden History

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 30, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Today, the Senate Intelligence Committee holds its first open hearing on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich gives us the latest on the hearings, and discusses what to expect from both the House and Senate investigations. 
  • After the failure of the Republican healthcare bill, the GOP is planning to put together yet another bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Congressman Tom Reed (R-NY) supported Speaker Paul Ryan's replacement plan, and he joins The Takeaway to discuss what House Republicans are planning for healthcare reform. 
  • The GOP healthcare plan would have barred states from expanding Medicaid, but since the proposal fell apart, states like Maine, Virginia, Kansas, and North Carolina are now considering an expansion in order to cover more citizens. Randall Hardy, a freshman Republican state senator from Kansas, and Thomas Saviello, a Republican state senator from Maine, explain why they support the Medicaid expansion, despite their party affiliations. 
  • The state of Michigan is finally offering large scale monetary relief to the people of Flint. On Tuesday, a federal judge approved a settlement that allocates $87 million to the city for the purpose of replacing roughly 18,000 contaminated water lines by 2020. Melissa Mays, a Flint resident, parent, and founder of advocacy group "Water You Fighting For," joins The Takeaway to discuss how the people of Flint are feeling now that a settlement has been reached. 

  • In 29 California neighborhoods, nearly 14 percent of children under the age of six have elevated levels of lead in their blood — levels that are almost three times higher than the contamination experienced by residents in Flint at the peak of the water crisis. Jill Johnston, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California and director of USC's Environmental Health Centers Outreach Program, weighs in. 
  • After Bill O’Reilly joked about Congresswoman Maxine Waters’ hair and Sean Spicer chastised journalist April Ryan at a press conference, women on social media are discussing sexism and racism on the job with the hashtag #BlackWomenAtWork. Rebecca Carroll, special projects producer for WNYC, discusses this viral social media moment and her own experience as a woman of color.
  • One hundred and fifty years ago, the United States agreed to give the Russia Empire $7.2 million in exchange for 586,412 square miles of Alaskan wilderness. It would be another 92 years before we would start calling Alaska a state. Mike Dunham, author of "The Man who Sold Alaska" and "The Man who Bought Alaska," examines how the deal came together, how Russian culture has survived in Alaska, and the significance of the purchase for the United States.


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Internet Privacy, A Hockey Victory Off the Ice, Race and The American Jury

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 29, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Congress is prepared to overturn broadband privacy rules that would have required Internet Service Providers to ask permission to collect, use, and sell personal user information. Dallas Harris, a policy fellow at the non-profit Public Knowledge, explains. 
  • Phillip Martin, a senior reporter at Takeaway co-producer WGBH, traveled to Belfast, Northern Ireland, and Dublin, Ireland, to look at divisions and cooperation between the two Irish entities that were once separated by a hard border. Now, with Great Britain’s divorce from the European Union, there is growing anxiety in Ireland that the border will once again be a point of separation.
  • The U.S. Women's National Hockey Team threatened to boycott the World Championships over unfair pay and treatment, but the sport's national governing body was able to reach an agreement with the team on Tuesday night. Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson, a player for the U.S. Women's National Hockey, weighs in.  
  • Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation magazine and host of "The Edge of Sports" podcast, explains how the NCAA is exploiting student-athletes, especially Division I basketball players during March Madness. He argues that the players should strike at the Final Four in order to force a change to how they're treated. 
  • The Supreme Court recently ruled that evidence of a racially- or ethnically-biased jury can cause a verdict to be thrown out. Paul Butler, a law professor and former federal prosecutor, says we should turn to the power of individual jurors to send an important message about an unequal system.
  • Why aren't jurors paid more? Are jury trials really better than getting a verdict from a judge? How does someone get excused from jury duty? Andrew Ferguson, a law professor at the UDC David A. Clarke School of Law and author of "Why Jury Duty Matters," answers these questions and more. 

 



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Why Roger Stone Would Testify, What's Next for Brexit, Erasing the Clean Power Plan

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Mar 28, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Roger Stone, a political advisor to President Donald Trump and author of "The Making of the President 2016: How Donald Trump Orchestrated a Revolution," is under investigation for potentially colluding with Russia during the election, and for his relationship with Julian Assange of WikiLeaks. Today, Roger Stone joins The Takeaway to respond to those allegations, and explain why he is willing to testify before the House Intelligence Committee.  
  • A new investigation by Takeaway co-producer WNYC looks into a series of questionable real estate transactions conducted by Paul Manafort, President Trump's former campaign manager, in New York City. Andrea Bernstein, editor of special projects for WNYC, weighs in.
  • According to Scott Pruitt, the head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, President Trump is expected to sign an executive order this week that will eliminate the Clean Power Plan, which has the primary goal of cutting carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. Coral Davenport, energy and environment reporter for our partners at The New York Times, has the details. 
  • While environmentalists may be dreading President Trump's move to eliminate the Clean Power Plan, many in the energy business are celebrating the move. Does a CPP repeal mean a 21st century renaissance for the coal industry? Wayne Winegarden, senior fellow at the Pacific Research Institute, answers.
  • The Montana legislature has passed a bill to prohibit foreign law from standing in American courts. Although not stated explicitly, many opponents of the bill say that it is based on unfounded fears and misunderstandings of Sharia law. But the bill could also potentially infringe on tribal sovereignty, according to Representative Shane Morigeau, a Montana state legislator and member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes.
  • What happens after U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May triggers Article 50 to officially leave the European Union? Gillian Tett, U.S. managing editor of The Financial Times, discusses the process and explains what we can expect.
  • Are we setting juries up to fail? There’s ample evidence that jury instructions are often composed of legalese or antiquated wording. There have been state initiatives to put jury instructions into “plain English,” but what more do we need to do to make sure jurors understand their civic duty? Nancy Marder, a professor of law at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law and director of Justice John Paul Stevens Jury Center, weighs in. 


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The Gorsuch Gamble, Historic Lies and Leaks, Justice and Juries in America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Mar 27, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On March 17th, a building collapsed in the highly-populated region of Mosul, Iraq. U.S. forces deployed airstrikes that day and confirmed this weekend that the strikes hit the building, and reports suggest that some 200 civilians were killed. It remains unclear if the U.S. military is responsible, but if confirmed, it would mark the largest loss of civilian life since the American fight against ISIS began. Sarhang Hamasaeed, director of Middle East Programs at the U.S. Institute of Peace, weighs in. 

  • With Democrats opposing the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, the only way forward for the GOP may be to invoke the so-called "nuclear option." Seung Min Kim, a Congressional reporter for POLITICO, joins The Takeaway to explain what to expect now that the nuclear option is in the GOP’s hands.
  • On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the case of Advocate Health Care Network V. Stapleton. The case will decide if church-exemption plans are allowed for any church-affiliated organization, like hospitals and daycare centers, which could cost millions of people to lose their pension plans. Norman Stein, a professor of Law at Drexel University, discusses the details of the case. 
  • As hate crime reports continue to climb, Kami Chavis, a professor and director of the criminal justice program at Wake Forest University School of Law, joins The Takeaway to discuss the ins-and-outs of hate crime law, and how they might change under the Trump Administration. 
  • Taking a page from President Richard Nixon, President Donald Trump is waging his own battle against leaks. Kit Roane, a producer with the Retro Report documentary team, looks back at the political consequences of lies and leaks. 
  • In the age of social media, how does anyone — especially someone high-profile — get a fair trial? One expert says it’s time to tap into the vast world of big data to find out what prospective jurors read and listen to, and what beliefs they might bring into the courtroom. Andrew Ferguson, a law professor at the UDC David A. Clarke School of Law and author of “Why Jury Duty Matters,” weighs in. 

 



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The Art of the Repeal, Female Athletes Take a Stand, The Endangered Rusty-Patch Bumblebee

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 24, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • President Donald J. Trump issued an ultimatum to Congress on Thursday: Pass the GOP plan to repeal Obamacare, or the Affordable Care Act stays. Will Republicans be able to rise to the challenge? Here to weigh in are Reed Galen, a Republican strategist who worked on both the 2000 and 2004 Bush-Cheney campaigns and worked for John McCain's presidential campaign, and Jeffrey Young, a reporter for The Huffington Post.
  • The U.S. Women's National Hockey Team is one of the best in the world, but the team has threatened to boycott the Ice Hockey World Championships over allegations of unfair pay and treatment by USA Hockey, the national governing body. Lindsay Gibbs, a sports reporter for ThinkProgress, has the details. 
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, shares her list of the best podcasts to listen to on your spring break. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, looks at the big new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including "Life," "Saban’s Power Rangers" and "T2: Trainspotting."
  • Tom Farrey, executive director of the Sports and Society Program at the Aspen Institute and a reporter for ESPN, finds that NCAA basketball is not all it's cracked up to be. The NCAA pitches a vision of opportunity, Farrey says, but his new study paints a very different picture.
  • The rusty-patched bumblebee is officially an endangered species. The bee’s population has dropped more than 90 percent over the past two decades. Sam Droege, head of the Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab at the U.S. Geological Survey, explains. 


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Trump's Growing Russia Problem, Terror in London, Art, Race, and Appropriation

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 23, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • A new report from The Associated Press finds that one of the key players within the 2016 Trump campaign, Paul Manafort, the president's former campaign chair, was reportedly paid for consulting work on behalf of Russian President Vladimir Putin. For details on this story we turn to Matthew Nussbaum, White House reporter at Politico.
  • Billions of dollars were moved out of Russia between 2010 and 2014 in what is described as a "global laundromat" operation, and hundreds of millions of those dollars were handled by British banks, many with outposts in the U.S. Drew Sullivan, editor and co-founder of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, explains. 
  • In a unanimous decision on Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that school districts must give students with disabilities an education that is held to a higher standard. Regina Skyer, founder and manager of the Law Offices of Regina Skyler and Associates, a special education law firm, analyzes the ruling. 
  • On Wednesday, a deadly domestic terrorist attack left at least three people dead and around 40 others wounded in London. Though the assailant was British-born, the Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack. Stephen Farrell, staff editor in the London Bureau for our partner The New York Times, explains what we know so far about the attack. 
  • A big vote is set to take place in the Lebanese parliament this week that could repeal Article 522 of the penal code. That article states that men who rape women can walk free if they marry their victims. Ali Awada, advocacy and campaign manager for the gender-equality campaign group ABAAD, argues that it's time to abolish this law. 
  • A new investigation has uncovered how Greece wasted some $803 million in aid for the refugee crisis. Daniel Howden, the lead reporter in the investigation and senior editor for the news outlet Refugees Deeply, explains. 
  • Artist Dana Schutz is showing a painting of Emmett Till in a casket at the Whitney Museum of Art. Schutz is white, and some artists are protesting her work because they say her interpretation is exploitive, oversteps racial sensitivities, and appropriates the black experience of a horrific and traumatic tragedy. Baruti Kopano, an associate professor at Morgan State University and co-editor of "Soul Thieves: The Appropriation and Misrepresentation of African American Popular Culture," discusses the controversy. 

 



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Closing the Deal on Healthcare, Police Accountablity, A Changing Planet

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 22, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Today, House Republicans are hoping a vote to pass their healthcare bill will move forward a day after President Trump was on Capitol Hill to help close the deal. But there has been a slew of last minute changes made to the bill in order to help secure its passage, including a placeholder fund for older Americans’ tax credits and providing states more flexibility on Medicaid. For details we turn to Margot Sanger Katz, healthcare correspondent for The New York Times.
  • The right to remain silent is the subject of this week's Case In Point from The Marshall Project. The case involves a father who was referred to in court documents as S.S. In New Jersey, he was accused of molesting his four year old daughter. During the interrogation, S.S. repeatedly made comments that his lawyers say were ambiguously invoking his right to silence. WNYC's Sarah Gonzalez sat down with Andrew Cohen, author of Case In Point, and Rebecca Livengood of the ACLU of New Jersey, to discuss the case. 

  • On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the case of County of Los Angeles V. Mendez, and will decide whether the county and two police officers must pay $4 million to a couple shot during a search for someone else. This case will determine if police can be held liable when they needlessly provoke a violent confrontation. Ryan Lockman, a civil rights attorney at Mark B. Frost & Associates in Philadelphia, and writer for the Lock Law Blog, analyzes the case.
  • Who is Alexander Acosta, President Donald Trump's nominee to lead the U.S. Department of Labor? A former member of George W. Bush’s National Labor Relations Board and clerk to Justice Samuel Alito, Acosta, who is unknown to most Americans and even many senators, goes before the Senate Judiciary Committee today. Seth Harris, an attorney, a former deputy secretary and acting U.S. Secretary of Labor under the Obama Administration, looks at some of the big issues Acosta is likely to come across if he is confirmed. 
  • Ranchers in Kansas that were hit hard by wildfires earlier this month are feeling left behind by President Trump, who they helped vote into office. Wildfires have charred 2 million acres across the U.S. so far this year, with more than 650,000 acres being scorched in Kansas alone. Garth Gardiner, who runs Gardiner Angus Ranch in Kansas, weighs in. 
  • Between 2008 and 2016, the Yale program on climate change communication gathered data on how Americans’ think about climate change. Jennifer Marlon, an associate research scientist at Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, shares the findings of this years long research project. 


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The Future of the Supreme Court, U.S. Military Might, Happiness on the Decline

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Mar 21, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Senate confirmation hearing for Supreme Court Justice Nominee Neil Gorsuch continues on Tuesday, with Judge Gorsuch taking questions for the first time. Tim Meyer, a professor of law and an enterprise scholar at Vanderbilt Law School, clerked for Judge Gorsuch of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit from 2007-2008. He explains why he believes Gorsuch should be confirmed. 
  • Former Wisconsin Senator Russ Feingold sat on the Senate judiciary committee for 16 years. He penned an opinion piece for The Guardian this week and argues that Judge Gorsuch's confirmation would bring illegitimacy to the Supreme Court and would “endorse and normalize unconstitutional political games.”
  • Fraser Speaks is a 27-year-old grad student living with bipolar disorder in Charleston, South Carolina. She gets her health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, and is particularly worried about changes to provisions that require insurance agencies to offer plans to people with pre-existing conditions.
  • President Donald Trump is quietly escalating military involvement in places like Syria, where his administration is sending some 400 Marines to the ISIS-controlled city of Raqqa. Several dozen Army rangers are also being sent to the contested area around Manbij and Kuwait, where the U.S. plans to station 2,500 more troops for use in Iraq and Syria. Andrew deGrandpr?, chief editor and Pentagon bureau chief for The Military Times, explains. 
  • Since October, around 255,000 people have been displaced from Mosul as the battle to retake the city from ISIS continues. Existing refugee camps are overwhelmed, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is working to create new spaces for people to find safety. Caroline Gluck, senior public information officer for the U.N. Refugee Agency, weighs in.
  • The 2017 World Happiness Report was released on Monday, and the United States ranks 14th. Norway has risen from 4th place to 1st. John Helliwell, a senior fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and editor of the 2017 World Happiness Report, has the details. 


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Russia Hearings on Capitol Hill, Flexibility in Higher-Ed, The New U.S.-North Korea Relationship

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Mar 20, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • FBI Director James Comey and NSA Head Michael Rogers are testifying before the House Intelligence Committee today about alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Karoun Demirjian, a correspondent for The Washington Post, explains what you need to know. 
  • On Friday, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson determined that diplomatic negotiation with North Korea would no longer be a viable option for nuclear deterrence. Ambassador Christopher Hill, who led the U.S. delegation to the Six Party Talks on North Korea’s nuclear program while serving as the assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2005 to 2009, analyzes the new U.S. approach to North Korea.
  • In 1987, the Senate voted against President Ronald Reagan's nominee for the Supreme Court, Robert Bork. That failure changed the way nominees approach their confirmation hearings. Barbara Dury, a producer with the Retro Report documentary team, explains. 
  • Flexibility has been essential for American community colleges. Early morning and late night lectures and online classes have helped empower students. This semester, Miami-Dade College in South Florida launched it's weekend college program. Rowan Moore Gerety, a reporter with public radio station WLRN, has the details. 
  • Are deportations stopping immigrant women who have been  victims of domestic violence from going to the police in times of crisis? Jasmine Garsd, reporter for Across Women's Lives from Takeaway co-producer PRI, answers. 


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The Future of the EPA, New Movie Releases, Privilege in America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 17, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Under President Trump’s proposed "skinny budget," the Environmental Protection Agency would be cut by 31 percent. We explore the future of the agency under the leadership of Scott Pruitt with Gina McCarthy, former EPA Administrator from 2013 - 2017. 
  • Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant and counterterrorism advisor to President Donald Trump, has been accused of being a member of a Hungarian Nazi group. Greg Jaffe, a reporter with The Washington Post, has the details. 
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, explores how streaming platforms like Amazon, Netflix, and Hulu helped make British television programs popular again in the United States. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the big new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including "Beauty and the Beast," "The Belko Experiment," and "Personal Shopper."
  • Today, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Donald Trump will hold their first in-person bilateral meeting since the election. Constanze Stelzenm?ller, Robert Bosch senior fellow with the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution, explains what you should expect. 


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The 'Skinny Budget,' The New Post-U.S. Trade Era, Jackson and Trump

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 16, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland have blocked President Donald Trump’s travel ban for people coming from parts of the Muslim world. Leon Fresco, an immigration attorney and former deputy assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, explains what's next. Fresco was also head of the Office of Immigration Litigation during the Obama Administration.
  • On Thursday morning, the Trump Administration released its "skinny budget" — a blueprint with total spending for each agency and department. Anna Chu, vice president for income security and education at the National Women's Law Center, has the details. 
  • When it comes to the Republican plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act, what are healthcare providers around the country hoping for, and what are they concerned about? For answers, we turn to Dr. Cecilia Norris, the medical director at the Free Medical Clinic in Iowa City, Iowa. 
  • China’s 2017 National People’s Congress concludes this week, with 3,000 lawmakers convening in Beijing to discuss China’s economic outlook, President Trump, and the nation's trade relationship with the U.S. Keith Bradsher, Shanghai bureau chief of The New York Times, has the latest on the meeting. 
  • On Wednesday, China’s premier said the nation was looking to avoid a trade war with the U.S. But this week, world leaders are meeting in Chile to discuss the Trans-Pacific Partnership in a post-U.S. era of trade. Carlo Dade, director of trade and investment policy for the Canada West Foundation, a Calgary-based think tank, explains. 
  • The Takeaway examines the physical foundation of modern capitalism: Containers. We begin in the Port of Oakland's Outer Harbor, where Alexis Madrigal, editor-at-large at Fusion and creator of the podcast "Containers," explains how containerization changed the global trade market since the Vietnam War. 
  • On Wednesday, President Trump laid a wreath at the Hermitage, Andrew Jackson’s home in Nashville, Tennessee in honor of the former president’s 250th birthday. Jackson’s portrait hangs in the Oval Office, and Trump aligns himself with Jackson’s populist legacy. Dr. Barbara A. Perry, presidential studies director at the Miller Center at University of Virginia, examines the similarities and differences between Presidents Trump and Jackson. 


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A Global Hunger Crisis, Fighting for Religious Freedom, Comedian Todd Barry

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 15, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Late last week, the United Nations announced that 20 million people in four countries — Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen — are facing or at risk of famine, marking what the U.N. has described as the worst humanitarian disaster since the creation of the global governing body. Nigeria has also been considered at risk of famine. Ciaran Donnelly, senior vice president of international programs at the International Rescue Committee, has the details. 

  • Today the Wisconsin HOPE Lab released "Hungry and Homeless in College," a new research report on food and housing insecurity among community college students, including more than 33,000 students at 70 community colleges in 24 states. Two thirds of the students surveyed struggle with food insecurity, and one half with housing insecurity. Sara Goldrick-Rab, one of the authors of new report, a professor of higher education policy and founder of the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, has the details. 

  • The European Court of Justice ruled this week that employers can ban workers from wearing headscarves in certain conditions. Maryam H’madoun, policy officer for the Open Society Justice Initiative and co-founder of Boss of My Own Head, which advocates the rights of Muslim women, weighs in. 

  • Ahead of the deadline for NCAA bracket picks, The Takeaway looks at basketball bracket alternatives and offers tips for selecting your March Madness bracket with Joe Gagliano,a sports betting guru and former NCAA basketball fixer.

  • Military commissaries function as discount grocery stores that offer food at low prices for service members and veterans. The prices are set by a formula and the program is funded by taxpayers. But now, lawmakers and the Department of Defense are looking into alternatives. Dorian Merina, a journalist reporting for the American Homefront Project, explains. 

  • The inclusion of women in the military has come with both successes and failures. MJ Hegar, an Air Force pilot and author of "Shoot Like A Girl: One Woman's Dramatic Fight in Afghanistan and on the Home Front," was the pilot responsible for challenging the Department of Defense's longstanding practice of barring women from thousands of ground combat positions in 2012. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta later rescinded this ban, known as the Ground Combat Exclusion Policy. She shares her story today on The Takeaway. 

  • Comedian Todd Barry is known for his appearances on shows like "Louie" and "Conan," but the subject of his first book chronicles his tour through small cities and secondary markets across the country, where his comedy changes with the crowd. He's the author of the new book, "Thank You for Coming to Hattiesburg."



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The Healthcare Shuffle, Turbulence in Europe, Hunting the Solar System

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Mar 14, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its estimates on the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Though the bill would reduce the federal deficit by $337 billion, the CBO estimates that the GOP plan to repeal and replace the ACA would raise the number of people without health insurance by 24 million by 2026. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, former director of Congressional Budget Office, discusses what the CBO found, and how Republicans are responding. 
  • Jury selection began this week for Derrick Stafford, one of the two African-American deputies charged with second degree murder in the fatal shooting of Jeremy Mardis, a 6-year-old autistic boy who was killed in November 2015. Bodycam footage shows the officers in Marksville, Louisiana shooting a vehicle in a car chase, wounding the driver, and killing the child. Bryn Stole, a criminal justice reporter for The Advocate, has the details on this case. 
  • On Monday, an Egyptian prosecutor ordered the release of former president Hosni Mubarak, who has been serving out a prison sentence in a Cairo military hospital for the better part of the last six years. Mona el-Ghobashy, a scholar of Egyptian politics and lecturer at Columbia University, explains how Egyptians are reacting to this news, and the current state of affairs in Egypt years after the Arab Spring.
  • Elections are being held in the Netherlands on Wednesday. It seems unlikely that Geert Wilders, the anti-immigrant far-right candidate, will become prime minister, but some say that no matter the outcome, "the Netherlands is headed in a nationalist direction." Nick Robins-Early, a world news reporter for The Huffington Post, weighs in. 
  • It's not just the Dutch who are feeling turbulence this election season. A wild presidential campaign season is underway in France after current President Fran?ois Hollande made the unprecedented decision not to run for a second five-year term. The ensuing race to replace him has been mired by numerous political scandals, unusual campaign rhetoric, and a sense of anxiety among voters as election day approaches. Adeline Sire a journalist based in France explains what's at stake. 

  • Asteroid hunter Dr. Carrie Nugent and her colleagues are mapping out where the biggest asteroids in our solar system are so they can then work on preventing collisions with our planet. She's the author of the book "Asteroid Hunters" and works as a staff scientist at Caltech/IPAC.


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ICE Prisons, Trump Says 'You're Fired' to U.S. Attorney, Gentrification in Pittsburgh

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Mar 13, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Tens of thousands of immigrants detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) were forced to work for $1.00 a day, or for nothing at all, according to a new class action lawsuit against one of America's largest private prison companies. Jacqueline Stevens, a professor and director of Northwestern University’s Deportation Research Clinic, has the details.
  • In a tweet sent out Saturday afternoon, Preet Bharara, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, said he had been fired after refusing to resign from his post. The Trump Administration asked Bharara and 45 other U.S. attorneys, all Obama appointees, to resign on Friday. Josh Dawsey, a White House reporter for POLITICO, says this is more than party politics. 
  • President Obama's failure to shutter the Guant?namo Bay detention center is turning into an opportunity for the Trump Administration, which wants to detain terror suspects at the military site. Jennifer Daskal, assistant professor at American University Washington College of Law and a former counsel to the assistant attorney general for National Security at the Department of Justice, explains. 
  • Katharine Kollins, president of the Southeastern Wind Coalition, discusses the fight over renewable energy growth in North Carolina, where Republicans are divided over wind technology. The Tar Heel State's first wind farm may end up being its only one.
  • The global urbanization boom has increased the demand for concrete and asphalt, which requires a tremendous amount of sand mining. The result has created considerable environmental damage, and even a black market for sand. Vince Beiser, a journalist covering the global sand crisis, weighs in. 
  • Dave Zirin, author and sports editor for The Nation and host of the podcast “Edge of Sports,” reflects on the criticism aimed at Colin Kaepernick, who has said he will end his kneeling protests during the national anthem now that he is free agent. 
  • James Logbo, a Pittsburgh transplant, and Nila Peyton, a native of The Steel City, discuss their perspectives on gentrification in this Pennsylvania city. This is the latest segment in The Takeaway's series, "Uncomfortable Truths: Confronting Racism in America."

     



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Getting Healthcare Right, An At Home Guide to SXSW, Children's Literature

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 10, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Under the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid was expanded to provide healthcare to low income families. Some 32 states expanded Medicaid, including Arkansas, a state led by Republican Governor Asa Hutchinson. Gov. Hutchinson explains how people in Arkansas will be effected under the new GOP plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us the latest on the healthcare negotiations on Capitol Hill. 
  • An investigation into the January 29th raid on the Yemeni village of Ghayil reveals a different version of events from what U.S. officials described. Iona Craig, a journalist reporting for The Intercept, explains. 
  • On Friday, South Korea decided to remove suspended President Park Geun-hye from office amid bribery allegations that involve Samsung. Matt Stiles, a special correspondent for the LA Times based in Seoul, has the details. 
  • 2017 is shaping up to be a strong year for horror films. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, explains how our historical anxieties have been represented in the horror films we love to fear.
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian and The Takeaway, previews some of the musical and stand up comedy acts worth checking out at SXSW in Austin in the coming week. For those who can't make it to the festival, there are also several ways to watch from home.


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Voices of Deportation, Reversing Regulations, Artists Come Home for Nina Simone

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 09, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Deportations have continued across the country since President Donald Trump vowed to crack down on undocumented people. A Department of Homeland Security statement issued in February stated that at least 680 individuals had been arrested in deportation raids so far this year. For details we turn to Tania Unzueta, the legal and policy director for the grassroots organization Mijente.
  • Since taking office, the Trump Administration has rolled back 90 regulations, ranging from consumer financial regulations to pollution guidelines. Sally Katzen, a law professor at New York University who worked on crafting regulations in the beginning of the Obama and Clinton administrations, says this is normal practice, but there are some unique aspects to the roll backs from the Trump Administration. 
  • Officials cited zoning issues when voting down a proposed mosque in Bayonne, New Jersey this week. But supporters of the mosque say this was a religiously-motivated decision fueled by fear of Muslims. Matt Katz, a reporter for Takeaway co-producer WNYC, has the details. 
  • House Republicans unveiled their long-awaited plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act this week. Democrats and some moderate Republicans have said the plan will hurt many Americans, but some people will surely benefit. Julie Rovner, chief Washington correspondent for Kaiser Health News, explains. 
  • What patients say and what doctors hear are often two vastly different things. Patients, anxious to convey their symptoms, feel an urgency to “make their case” to their doctors. Doctors, under pressure to be efficient, multitask while patients speak and often miss the key element. Dr. Danielle Ofri, associate professor of medicine at New York University, a practitioner at Bellevue Hospital in New York, author of "What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear," argues that the doctor-patient conversation is the most powerful diagnostic tool. 
  • Four artists have pooled resources in order to purchase the childhood home of Nina Simone in Tryon, North Carolina. The home was put on the market last year and could have been forgotten entirely were it not for the purchase. Adam Pendleton, one of the artists who purchased Ms. Simone’s home, explains why the structure is so important. 


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Fighting for Women, The CIA and WikiLeaks, An Escape From Auschwitz

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 08, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On International Women’s Day, The Takeaway looks back at the history of this global event and how it is marked differently around the world with Kavita Ramdas, a feminist activist and philanthropic adviser.
  • On Tuesday, Wikileaks a batch of documents that allegedly tie the CIA to software surveillance tools to access smartphones, computers, and internet-connected televisions. For details on this story we turn to Jake Williams, founder of Rendition Infosec, a threat intelligence firm based in Augusta, Georgia.
  • President Donald Trump's plan to replace the Affordable Care Act will place a greater burden on older Americans, who could see premiums rise by more than $3,000 a year. Max Richtman, president and CEO of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare and former staff director of the Senate Special Committee on Aging, explains. 
  • Rod Rosenstein went before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday as the president’s nominee for deputy attorney general. Because Attorney General Jeff Sessions has recused himself from the investigation into Russian meddling in the election, Rosenstein will oversee that investigation. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what you need to know. 

 



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Reshaping Obamacare, The War on Drugs, A Pioneering President

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Mar 07, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Republicans in the House of Representatives released the text of a bill Monday night that would remake the Affordable Care Act in the coming years. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details.
  • After an increase in diplomatic pressure, Iraq is now excluded from the group of countries included in the latest iteration of President Trump's travel ban. What is the Iraqi response to this decision, and what does it suggest about the future of the U.S.-Iraq relationship? For answers, we turn to Omar Al Nidawi, director for Iraq at Gryphon Partners, a strategic advisory firm.
  • An Ohio community is trying to fight the heroin epidemic by bringing misdemeanor charges against drug users who overdose and are revived by emergency responders using an antidote. Barry Bennett, a paramedic and the executive director of the Pickaway Area Recovery Services, has the details. 
  • The Department of Defense is investigating an undisclosed number of Marines who shared nude photos of female service members in a private Facebook group. Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a staff writer for The Washington Post and a former Marine infantryman, discusses the developing investigation, and the ongoing problems of sexual harassment within military ranks.
  • Nicholas Glisson was a cancer survivor who required a lot of special care. He was imprisoned after being convicted for transferring a two Oxycontin painkillers to a confidential informant, and he died after 37 days in prison. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor of The Marshall Project, and Alma Glisson, Nicholas' mother, share his story.


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A New Travel Ban, A Secret Cyberwar, Actor Danny Glover

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Mar 06, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Trump Administration issued a new, updated immigration ban via executive order today. Will this new executive order be able to stick, or will it face another legal challenge? For answers we turn to Faiza Patel, co-director of the Brennan Center's Liberty and National Security Program. Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear the full conversation. 
  • Over the weekend, The New York Times published a report detailing a “secret cyberwar” launched during the Obama Administration against North Korea. One of the authors of that report, David Sanger, national security correspondent for our partner the New York Times, shares the details of this story today on The Takeaway. Joel Wit, a senior fellow at the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, explains how much of a threat North Korea has become in the 21st century.
  • Activist and actor Danny Glover joined more than a thousand workers to march on Nissan’s factory in Canton, Mississippi this weekend. Protesters say the factory harasses and intimidates its predominantly black workforce, who have been denied the right to vote for a union. Glover discusses the protests today on The Takeaway. 
  • 2017 has already been a deadly year for transgender people across America, and states have varying laws when it comes to protections for gender identity in hate crimes. Emily Waters, senior manager of National Research and Policy at the Anti Violence Project, weighs in.
  • As deportations begin to rise under President Trump, churches and cities are declaring themselves sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants. It’s the latest chapter of a movement with a long history. Scott Michels, a producer for the Retro Report documentary team, examines the history of the nationwide sanctuary movement. 
  • Three weeks after his release from prison, former inmate Aaron Glosscock discusses what it's like to adjust to life in a world where he should have more freedom, but he is greatly constrained in what he can and cannot do.
  • Anna Sale, host of the podcast Death, Sex & Money, talks with her high school prom date, Ammar Ahmed, a Muslim-American whose lifestyle and values she says she never understood in her white, rural, West Virginia town.


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World on Edge: Russia, The U.S. and History’s Greatest Geopolitical Chess Match

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Mar 03, 2017


Is the world seeing the dawn of a new Cold War between the United States and Russia? As questions continue to swirl about the Kremlin’s involvement in the 2016 presidential election, a familiar pattern seems to be emerging. In this special episode, we explore how the nation of about 143 million has changed since the Russian Revolution of 1917, and how the history between the U.S. and Russia is influencing the geopolitical landscape today.  Here’s what you’ll find in this special episode:

  • A giant chunk of 20th century history has come crashing into the chaotic first weeks of the Trump Administration. David Foglesong, a history professor at Rutgers University and author of "The American Mission and the Evil Empire,” says that in order to understand the current news cycle, you have to go back to 1903.
  • Graphic novelist Victoria Lomasko, the author of “Other Russias,” has spent nearly a decade documenting and drawing the lives of ordinary Russians throughout the country. The stories she tells from regular people offers a sharp contrast to the messages being put out of the Kremlin all over the vast land of Mother Russia.
  • On Capitol Hill, the latest chapter in our relationship with Russia is being written by the hour. On Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from any investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election after revelations surfaced that he met twice last year with Russia's U.S. ambassador. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us the latest.
  • 100 years after the Russian Revolution, what is the modern political scene like in Russia today? Keith Gessen is founding editor of the literature, culture, and politics journal n+1, and a professor at the Columbia Journalism School. Gessen says the Kremlinology of the past has been replaced with what he has coined Putinology — the study of America’s favorite Russian bad guy.
  • Mikhail Zygar, a Russian journalist who started the country’s first independent TV station, is now working on the project, “1917: Free History,” which chronicles the letters, memoirs, and diaries of the Russian Revolution. His project is intended to remind Russians that they may be freer than they think.


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Russia and Jeff Sessions, Reimagining Immigration, A Pioneering Advocate

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Mar 02, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reportedly met with an official from Russia twice during the 2016 election, "at the height of what U.S. intelligence officials say was a Russian cyber campaign to upend the U.S. presidential race," according to a new report from The Washington Post. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details.
  • Repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act was a key tenant of President Trump's campaign from the start. But two months into their control of Congress, Republicans can't seem to agree on a concrete way forward. Mary Agnes Carey, partnerships editor and senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, walks us through the nuts and bolts of the specific GOP healthcare proposals that are on the table.
  • The new documentary “American Veteran” tells the story of Sergeant Nick Mendes, who was paralyzed from the neck down by an IED in Afghanistan and Wendy Eichler, the medical caregiver he met in a V.A. hospital and fell in love with. Julie Cohen, director of "American Veteran," weighs in. 
  • On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump called for a “merit-based system” that Democrats and Republicans could work together on. Stephen W. Yale-Loehr teaches immigration law at Cornell University and Melissa Babel, a certified immigration law specialist with the Law Society of Upper Canada and senior manager at KPMG Law in Toronto, Canada, discuss the president's plan. 
  • In part IV of our series "Commuted: Life After Prison," The Takeaway follows former inmate Aaron Glasscock as he says goodbye to his family and friends and arrives at a court-mandated halfway house operated by Dismas Charities. We also hear from Raymond Weiss, president and CEO Dismas Charities, and Jan Kempf, executive vice president and COO of the organization.
  • The new mini-series "When We Rise" will air on ABC and chronicle the real-life personal and political struggles, set-backs, and triumphs of a group of LGBT men and women who helped pioneer one of the last legs of the U.S. civil rights movement. Part III of this series features the story of LGBT advocate Richard Socarides and his role in the Clinton White House. The Takeaway hears from Charles Socarides, an actor and brother of Richard Socarides, and Richard Socarides himself. 


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Trump Looks for a Reset, An Emotional Release, The Music of Resistance

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Mar 01, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • In a prime time address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night, President Donald Trump laid out this policy priorities and called on the House and Senate to work together. Today The Takeaway hears from three voters — a Republican who voted for Trump, a Democrat who voted for Trump, and a Republican who didn't vote for Trump — to find out what they thought of the president's address. Shirl St. Germain is a former restaurant owner in Marco Island, Florida, Kenneth Lanci is founder of Consolidated Solutions a business in Cleveland, and Hal Scoggins is an attorney from Portland, Oregon. 
  • On Monday, bomb threats were called into Jewish schools and community centers in Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia, in what is the fifth wave of threats in the past two months. David Shtulman, director of the Jewish Federation of Greater Ann Arbor, weighs in on the attacks. 
  • Every 20 years, Florida amends its constitution through the Constitution Revision Commission — the only state with such a body. The members of the 2017-18 Constitution Revision Commission are being named this month. For details on this process and how the state's Constitution may change, we turn to Sandy D'Alemberte, president emeritus of Florida State University and a former state legislator who chaired the Constitution Revision Commission in 1977-78.
  • Today, the Texas Supreme Court hears oral arguments in a Houston case challenging the city’s benefit policy for same-sex couples, despite the fact that the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on same sex marriage in 2015. Evan Wolfson, founder and president of Freedom To Marry, discusses the case. 
  • In part III of our series, "Commuted: Life After Prison," we meet Aaron Glasscock for the first time as a free man. As Aaron is set free, he quickly learns that life outside looks much different than he remembered it. He’s both worried and optimistic about the future, hoping that the skills he gained in prison will be enough to get him a job. He’s also set rules for himself to help set his life on a positive course. 
  • Indian-American and Muslim musician Zeshan Bagewadi discusses his cover of George Perkins' civil rights-era song "Cryin' in the Streets." Perkins originally wrote the song in 1970 as a reaction to the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968.


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The Promise of Jobs, A Taste of Freedom, 'Muthaland'

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Feb 28, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • As part of his budget plan, President Trump is seeking a $54 billion increase in defense spending, with cuts of equal proportion to domestic spending. Dakota Wood, who served in U.S. Marine Corps for two decades and is now a senior research fellow for defense programs at The Heritage Foundation, explores how this boost in spending could affect the military and how we wage war.
  • The Trump Administration pledges to bring 25 million jobs to America over the next decade, but can the president deliver? For answers, we turn to Robert Reich, secretary of labor under President Clinton from 1993 to 1997. He also served in the administrations of Presidents Ford and Carter, and is currently a professor of public policy at the University of California.

  • Daycare centers on military bases are already understaffed and have long waiting lists, and President Trump's hiring freeze is making families scramble to find childcare. Amy Bushatz, a reporter for Military.com and a military spouse, explains. 
  • Hundreds of former employees of Sterling Jewelers — which operates Jared and Kay Jewelers — claim they were sexually harassed (groped, pressured into sex acts, and more), lost jobs for refusing advances, and were subjected to widespread gender discrimination, according to a new report in The Washington Post. Drew Harwell, the reporter behind this new piece, weighs in. 
  • In part II of our new series, "Commuted: Life After Prison," The Takeaway travels with the family of Aaron Glasscock to Manchester Federal Correctional Institution in Kentucky — the place that Aaron's family will meet him for the first time as a free man. We hear from Aaron's mom, Pigeon Deep, his sister Jeanie Yokum, and Eddie Lanham, a close family friend.
  • Indian-American actor and performer Minita Gandhi joins The Takeaway to discuss her one-woman show, "Muthaland," which tells the story of a young woman whose life is forever changed on a trip to India after she unearths family secrets, encounters a prophet, and ultimately discovers her voice within a culture of silence.


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Deadly Xenophobia, An NBA Revolt Against Trump, Life After Prison

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Feb 27, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • After the most contentious election for Democratic National Committee chair in decades, members narrowly picked former Labor Secretary and establishment favorite Tom Perez. Perez, who is the first Latino to lead the Democratic Party, joined the race in December to oppose Representative Keith Ellison, a member of the Bernie wing of the party. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details. 
  • There's been much scrutiny over the ideology of Steve Bannon, the former head of Breitbart News who's now President Trump's chief strategist. But Bannon is not the only figure in Trump's White House who represents a new breed of conservative thought. Michael Anton, a former George W. Bush–era speechwriter and private-equity executive, is now playing a handful of different roles in the Trump Administration. Tina Nguyen, staff reporter for Vanity Fair, explains what you need to know.
  • Last week an evening at the Austin Bar & Grill in Olathe, Kansas quickly turned to tragedy when a gunman entered the establishment and reportedly yelled “get out of my country” before he shot two immigrants from India. Tapash Chakraborty, an Indian-American resident of Kansas for over 20 years, and his daughter, Jinia Chakraborty, a second generation Indian-American, discuss this shooting's impact on the local community and what it means to be an immigrant in America today.
  • Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation magazine and host of "The Edge of Sports" podcast, explains why many NBA players and teams are revolting against President Donald Trump, and how the league’s commissioner is handling the players’ right to speak out.
  • The 89th Academy Awards took place on Sunday night. Though the awards ceremony was celebrated for being the most diverse in decades, controversy and chaos broke out when the wrong film was announced in the "Best Picture" category. Rafer Guzman, film critic for The Takeaway and Newsday, has the details. 
  • American author Jodi Picoult joins The Takeaway to read an essay that confronts her own understanding of race and racism as a privileged white woman in America. The complicated emotions and feelings of trying to write about race played an important role in her latest novel, "Small Great Things."
  • The Obama Administration issued more commutations than any other U.S. president on record. In a new series, "Commuted: Life After Prison," The Takeaway follows an inmate, Aaron Glasscock, and his family as he is released after 18 years in prison and begins the transition into society. Today we hear from Aaron's mother, Agnes Deep.


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A New Democratic Leader, Pruitt's Carbon Love Affair, Revolutionary Films

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Feb 24, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The decision over who will lead the Democratic National Committee (DNC) is perhaps the most important question for whether the party can recover from its loss in 2016, and the bitter split that the primary contest forged. Howard Dean, chairman of the DNC from 2005 to 2009, a six term governor of Vermont, and former presidential candidate, looks ahead to what's next for the Democratic Party. 
  • Following Scott Pruitt’s confirmation as head of the EPA, thousands of emails have been released documenting the former Oklahoma attorney general’s ties to fossil fuel industry. Lisa Graves, director of the Center for Media and Democracy, explains. 
  • The worst appears to be over for rain-drenched San Jose, but residents are dealing with severe flood damage and are expecting more storms over the weekend. We look at the impact of California's wettest winter in 20 years with Julia Sulek, reporter for the San Jose Mercury News.
  • The 89th Annual Academy Awards will be held this coming Sunday evening. Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, reviews the Oscars nominees for Best Original Song.
  • This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of "The Graduate," "Bonnie and Clyde," "In the Heat of the Night," "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," and "Doctor Dolittle," all of which were nominated for Best Picture. Mark Harris documented the production histories of all five films in his book "Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood," and sees this group of films as evidence of a transitional period in Hollywood with themes that tie to 2017.


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Transgender Rights, China Worries, Understanding the Cosmos

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Feb 23, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Wednesday, the Trump Administration announced that it in plans to overturn an Obama-era protection that allows transgender students to use the bathroom of their choosing in schools. Here to discuss the policy shift is Jillian T. Weiss, executive director of the Transgender Legal Defense and Education Fund, and Donna Milo, a Republican business owner and transgender woman.
  • Protest camps around the Dakota Access Pipeline are expected to be shut down by the Army Corps of Engineers today. For a look at where the movement goes next and for an analysis of other grassroots protests, The Takeaway turns to Jay Caspian Kang, a correspondent for Vice News Tonight, and writer-at-large for the New York Times Magazine.
  • A new study that collected data from people in 47 states over the course of 17 years reveals that teens are less likely to attempt suicide in places where gay and lesbian couples have the right to marry one another. Julia Raifman, postdoctoral fellow in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Epidemiology and co-author of the study, explains.
  • If President Trump does end up pursuing a very aggressive trade policy with China, and the Chinese government retaliates and targets Chinese students, many U.S. colleges could potentially lose billions of dollars in tuition revenue, according to Kirk Carapezza, managing editor of our partner WGBH’s higher education desk.
  • Scientists have announced two major discoveries this week that have the potential to drastically alter some of their previous held understandings of the cosmos. Jason Kendall, adjunct professor of astronomy at William Paterson University, joins The Takeaway to explain the significance of these developments. 
  • Joe Feingold, a 93-year-old Holocaust survivor, donated his violin to Brianna, a 13-year-old schoolgirl from the Bronx. Their story is told in the Oscar-nominated documentary, "Joe's Violin." Today, the Takeaway hears from Graham Parker and Kahane Cooperman, directors of the film. 


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Tension Among Neighbors, Fighting Anti-Semitism, Desperation at Sea

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Feb 22, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Department of Homeland Security released documents yesterday that translate President Trump's immigration orders into practice for the nation's immigration enforcers. Camille Mackler, director of legal initiatives for the New York Immigration Coalition, Jong-Min You, a Korean-born undocumented immigrant who has lived in the U.S. his whole life, and DACA recipient Andrea Bonilla, discuss the Trump Administration's rules could mean for immigrants nationwide. 

  • More and more hate groups are springing up across the United States, and Jewish communities have seen increasing waves of vandalism and bomb threats. Following the lead of his daughter, President Trump finally acknowledged this violence on Tuesday. Rabbi Jonah Pesner, director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, discusses the recent uptick in anti-Semitic threats and the president's response. 
  • Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly will meet with Mexican President Enrique Pe?a Nieto during a two day visit to Mexico this week, after a fraught first month for the new administration and Mexico. Jorge Guajardo, Mexican ambassador to China from 2007-2013 and consul general to Mexico in Austin, Texas from 2005 to 2007, explains what we can expect from this meeting. 
  • The bodies of 74 migrants washed ashore in Libya on Monday. In recent months, the route across the Mediterranean has proven to be increasingly dangerous, and as spring rapidly approaches, officials fear that more and more migrants will attempt to make the often deadly trip. Mary Fitzgerald, a journalist specializing in Libya and a contributing author to the book "The Libyan Revolution and its Aftermath," analyzes the politics surrounding the migrant crisis, and reflects on the dangerous journey for those crossing the Mediterranean.


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Angry Town Hall Meetings, Sex Offender Rights, Seeking Out the KKK

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Feb 21, 2017


Coming up on today’s show:

  • On Monday, President Donald Trump appointed Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as national security advisor. McMaster is a West Point graduate who earned a Silver Star during the 1991 Gulf War, and is well regarded for his innovative military strategies. George Packer, a staff writer at The New Yorker who first wrote about McMaster in 2006, weighs in on McMaster’s appointment.
  • Iraqi led forces launched an offensive charge against ISIS to retake the western part of Mosul on Sunday. In light of the recent efforts from the Iraqi Army, U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis made an unannounced visit to Baghdad on Monday. Emma Graham-Harrison, an international affairs correspondent for The Guardian, joins The Takeaway to discuss the latest efforts by Iraqi forces and what Mattis' visit to Iraq may signify.
  • The Presidents’ Day holiday weekend proved to be a difficult time for lawmakers who are wrestling over the repeal and replacement of Obamacare, among other issues. Here with an update on the latest is Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich.
  • In the early months of 2017, there’s been an unprecedented amount of activity on the state-level in regards to broadband access. Large telecommunications monopolies are digging their heels in on a number of issues and, in some places, citizens are fighting back. Here to explain is Christopher Mitchell, director of Community Broadband Networks at the Institute for Local Self Reliance.
  • Back in 2010, a 15-year-old Mexican citizen was shot across the U.S.-Mexico border by a border patrol agent. Is he protected by the Constitution? It’s a question The Supreme Court will hear in the case Hernandez Vs. Mesa. Margaret Hu, associate professor of law at Washington and Lee University, discusses the case and what the ruling would mean for the future.
  • The latest installment of our Case in Point series explores a legal case about the rights of registered sex offenders that has gone all the way to the Supreme Court. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, and Glenn Gerding, North Carolina Appellate Defender, discuss the case.
  • Daryl Davis, a musician, speaker, and author, discusses his experience as a black man seeking out members of the KKK and other race-oriented hate groups to challenge their prejudices. His story is told in the new documentary, "Accidental Courtesy."


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Executive Angst: Understanding America’s Presidential Power Struggle

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Sat, Feb 18, 2017


Today, we're dedicating our entire show to thinking deeply about the role of the president and executive power.  Here’s what you’ll find in this special Presidents’ Day episode:

  • From George Washington and Andrew Jackson, to Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, the function of the highest office in the land has expanded and contracted over time — sometimes beyond what the nation’s founders ever intended. Where did the concept of executive power originate, and what does the Constitution actually say about it? For answers, we turn to Eric Posner, a professor of law at the University of Chicago.
  • President Donald Trump could certainly be compared with other presidents when it comes to his outlook on executive authority. But that doesn't reassure John Yoo. He's a law professor at the University of California at Berkeley, and former Justice Department official under President George W. Bush. He has supported past exertions of presidential power for matters relating to torture, surveillance and drones. And yet, he has serious reservations about President Trump.
  • The judiciary provides a key check on the president's powerful hand. But in recent weeks, we've seen the Trump Administration take on the court system, and what has traditionally been a healthy tug-of-war is suddenly starting to look more like an out-right war between the executive and judicial branches. Leon Fresco, former deputy assistant attorney general at the Justice Department and former head of the the Office of Immigration Litigation under the Obama Administration, says over time, the judiciary has become defensive of its powers — and with good reason.
  • Many voices on Capitol Hill say that Congress has ceded too much authority to the president. U.S. Senator Mike Lee of Utah is one of the lawmakers behind the "Article One Project,” an initiative based on the idea that Congress was always meant to be the driving force in federal policymaking. He discusses the plan with Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich.
  • If you could redesign our democracy, knowing what we know today about our world, how would you do it? Pippa Norris, a lecturer in comparative politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, spends a lot of time thinking about how democracies function, how power is balanced, and the role of elections and public opinion in the shaping of our government. Today on The Takeaway she imagines the future of the U.S. system of government.

 



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Intel Unease, Movie Music, When Darwin Reached America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Feb 17, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The intelligence community appears to be at war with President Trump amid leaks over Russian involvement during the 2016 election. Mark Lowenthal, former assistant director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production under President Bush, and current president of the Intelligence and Security Academy, explains. 
  • PRI and The Takeaway have been sending your pressing questions to President Trump using his favorite method of communication — Twitter — in a project we're calling "100 Questions in 100 Days." With no response, we turn to Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich to answer some of the biggest questions of the week.
  • President Trump is in Charleston, South Carolina, today to attend the rollout of a new plane from Boeing. On Wednesday, Boeing's South Carolina workers overwhelmingly rejected a move to unionize by a vote of 3 to 1. Jeff Hirsch, a law professor at UNC-Chapel Hill who specializes in labor relations, joins The Takeaway to discuss how bad perceptions and big campaigns shaped the vote, and what it means for the future of unions under Trump. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new big-budget action movie "The Great Wall," which stars actors Matt Damon, Tian Jing, and Willem Dafoe.
  • The 89th Academy Awards will take place on February 26th. Though there is a sea of strong contenders, Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker argues that a musical is bound to win Best Original Score at the 2017 Oscars. 
  • People with student loans should be wary of scams that promise debt forgiveness. Betsy Mayotte, the director of consumer outreach and compliance at American Student Assistance, says these kinds of programs are everywhere, and explains how to spot them. 


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The View from Moscow, Puzder's Done, Fake Voting Fraud

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Feb 16, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Americans wake up every day to a new crop of political developments that range from odd to alarming. Many are about Russia being involved in some part of American life where it hadn't been recently. But how does this all look in Russia? Charles Maynes, an independent journalist in Moscow, answers
  • Fast food magnate Andrew Puzder officially withdrew from his nomination to be labor secretary under President Donald Trump, amid concerns that he wouldn't make it through confirmation because he had hired a nanny who lacked permission to work in the U.S. He also had been accused of domestic abuse by his ex wife, and wage theft and mistreatment by workers at his Carl's Jr. restaurants. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the latest. 
  • The immigration ban has raised broader questions about how far officials at the border can go while searching private property, including phones and social media. Rights are not always completely clear at the border and agents often have a good amount of leeway in denying or permitting entry. Rey Koslowski of the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs explains.
  • President Trump and his policy director Stephen Miller have both claimed that voters were bused into New Hampshire from Massachusetts, swinging the election there to Hillary Clinton. Former New Hampshire Attorney General Tom Rath, a longtime Republican political consultant, is one of many in the Granite State saying that just simply isn't true.
  • The rapidly changing U.S.-Russia relationship is having effects in many former Soviet-bloc countries, often because they see the U.S. as an influence to help protect basic human rights. Two former Uzbek political prisoners, Umida Niyazova and Sanjar Umarov, are hoping the U.S. can keep pressure on one of the most repressive regimes in the world. 
  • Seventy years after they were recorded, two songs sung by Holocaust survivors have been unearthed at the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology at the University of Akron. David Baker, the center's executive director, has been on a mission to unlock the recordings done on wire spools shortly after the end of the war.

 



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Trump Ties to Russia; Kushner and Netanyahu; A Very Good Dog

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Feb 15, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • More details are emerging around the dismissal of national security adviser Michael Flynn and his ties to Russia, but late last night we learned that members of Trump's campaign staff were often in contact with senior Russian intelligence officials. Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich will have more. 
  • The Kushner family has a relationship with Benjamin Netanyahu that goes back decades. Now Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law, is the White House's leading adviseron on Middle East affairs as President Trump is set to meet with the Israeli Prime Minister today. Ambassador Dennis Ross, a former Middle East peace negotiator and adviser to both Democratic and Republican presidential administrations, joins us.
  • In the same week that Israeli president Benjamin Netanyahu visits President Donald Trump at the White House, a delegation of 11 current and former NFL players was supposed to take a trip to Israel. Four of the players bailed on the trip, which appeared designed to make them look as if they supported settlement policy, after Dave Zirin of The Nation penned an open letter to players that was signed by Angela Davis, John Carlos and others.
  • Only one can be Best In Show, but they're all good dogs at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Sarah Montague, cohost of the Dog Story podcast and resident pup expert joined us to talk about the 141st version of the annual dog show that concluded last night. 
  • Since 2010, increasingly conservative state legislatures have been passing laws designed to make abortion harder to access, despite Roe v. Wade. Last year, 60 bills were passed, and Elizabeth Nash of the Guttmacher Institute explains why restrictions have been getting more extreme.
  • Filmmaker Garrett Bradley's 'Alone' is about the hole ripped in other lives when a loved one is behind bars. In this short, Alon? Watts lives in New Orleans, where she has became a single mother and a woman in a relationship with someone in prison overnight.

 

 

 



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Flynn Out, Atrocities in Syria, Oroville Dam

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Feb 14, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Trump's National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigned late last night after reports that he had misled Vice President Mike Pence about his contacts with Russia. The Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us with the latest, including who might take over the job. 
  • Syrian government helicopters dropped chlorine on residential areas in Aleppo at least eight times from Nov. 17-Dec. 13, according to a report by Human Rights Watch that was published Monday. Ole Solvang, deputy director for emergencies at Human Rights Watch talked to us from Paris about his organization's report on chemical weapons use by President Bashar al-Assad's regime. His organization's report followed one from Amnesty International that up to 13,000 people were summarily hanged in secret from 2011-2015. Assad dismissed the report. Martin Chulov, who covers the Middle East for the Guardian joined us to discuss the current situation.
  • Net neutrality advocates are worried because FCC chairman Ajit Pai has unraveled several Obama administration polices in his first few weeks on the job. Also watching with trepidation has been commissioner Mignon Clyburn, who explained what these changes mean. 
  • Nearly 200,000 people have been ordered to evacuate from an area downstream of the tallest dam in the United States, and more rain is in the forecast. The dam's spillways have been eroded by the force of water rushing over it, but efforts are underway to shore them up. This is the scenario environmental groups were concerned about when they filed a lawsuit 12 years ago to try forcing regulators to strengthen the dam. Mark Ogden of the Association of State Dam Safety Officials is with us to explain. 
  • Attorneys for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl are seeking to get his court martial dismissed because a member of his chain of command has already proclaimed the soldier a traitor and a deserter and suggested he be executed. That commander is President Donald Trump, whose comments on the campaign trail were shown to a military judge, who called it "disturbing material." Rachel VanLandingham, a retired Air Force lawyer and current law professor at  Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles, joined us to discuss the implications.
  • When he was President, George Washington tried to get around laws prohibiting slavery in the North by sending his nine slaves south twice a year to "reset the clock" requiring them to be freed after six months. One time, one of them didn't come back. "Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge" tells her story, and author Erica Armstrong Dunbar is with us. 


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Flynn Under Scrutiny,  Ranchers on Trial, Hypernormal Reality

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Feb 13, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • National security adviser Michael Flynn faces scrutiny for allegations of contact with Russia's ambassador before President Trump took office. On Friday, the president said he would "look into" the claims, and if they prove true, Flynn's conduct may likely have been illegal. Ryan Goodman, editor in chief of Just Security and former special counsel to the Department of Defense, joins us.
  • In at least half a dozen states, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers made hundreds of arrests, sweeping up undocumented immigrants in a wide-ranging dragnet. Camille Mackler, Director of Legal Initiatives for the New York Immigration Coalition explains the implications of the raids.
  • Testimony begins today in the trial of half a dozen of the defendants involved in the armed standoff between Rancher Cliven Bundy and federal agents in 2014. Jenny Wilson of the Las Vegas Review Journal has been covering the case, and joins us to talk about the second trial involving the Bundy family and public land. His sons were acquitted in the occupation of a national wildlife refuge. 
  • Oregon rancher Keith Nantz has said he doesn't approve of the Bundy family's approach to the problem, but understands why they are upset. He explains the issues at stake for beef producers in the American West, why they need access to federal land, and why changing regulations lead to economic losses. 
  • The University of Connecticut women's basketball team is going for its 100th straight win tonight. ESPN columnist Mechelle Voepel is here to look ahead to the Huskies' game against No. 6 South Carolina, and to discuss what the milestone means for the world of sports. 
  • Seizing the property of suspects has long been considered a critical law-enforcement, too. But taking the possessions of people before they have been convicted of a crime -- innocent people, in other words -- has significant real-world consequences. Maurice Chammah of the Marshall Project joins us to discuss some of those, as well as the future of the policy.
  • Is massive, widespread self-delusion by society a response to the chaotic and unpredictable world? British filmmaker Adam Curtis argues it might be in his documentary "HyperNormalisation." In the film released just ahead of the 2016 election, Curtis attempts to show that, rather than respond to and accept a chaotic and unpredictable world, we delude ourselves into thinking that things are far simpler and more easily explainable than they actually are. 

 

 



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Travel Ban Rejected, Presidential Ethics, Getting By on Your Parents' Jobs

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Feb 10, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

The 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals rejected President Trump's ban on travel to the United States by people from seven largely Muslim countries. Leon Fresco, former head immigration lawyer in the Obama Justice Department, joins us to talk about the ruling.

We asked if your parents' livelihoods would be feasible for you, today, in 2017 America. Your responses gave us a look at the current state of the economy for working people.

Donald Trump tweeted his anger at the department-store chain Nordstrom this week, claiming they mistreated his daughter when they stopped selling her fashion line. His adviser Kellyanne Conway followed up on that by overtly telling people to buy her products in what seems like a clear violation of government ethics laws. Kathleen Clark, professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis, joined us to explain the week in ethics issues.

Japan prime minister Shinzo Abe is set to visit the United States for a summit with President Trump. But instead of coming to the White House, Abe will stay at Mar-A-Lago, Trump's private club and hotel in South Florida. Jim Schoff, a former senior adviser for East Asia policy in the Department of Defense, will talk to us about the nature of the United States-Japan relationship. 

Every Friday, Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, drops by to review the new releases hitting the box office. This week, he looks at "Fifty Shades Darker," sequel to the box-office hit "Fifty Shades of Grey," as well as "John Wick: Chapter 2" and "The LEGO Batman Movie." 

Translating a president's words to another language is always a tricky affair. President Donald Trump's syntax and word choices present some of their own challenges. David Bellos, director of the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication at Princeton University, goes over some of the unique issues translators face. 

The Canadian province of Manitoba, which shares borders with North Dakota and Minnesota, has become a hotspot destination for an increasing number of asylum seekers fleeing from the United States to cross the border by foot. Many risk their lives at this time of year so they can appeal for asylum in Canada, rather than the US. 



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Refugee Organizations Stressed, ACA Replacement Proposals, Fate of the Obama Movement after '08

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Feb 09, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Organizations that help refugees have been scrambling since President Trump's travel ban was implemented nearly two weeks ago. David Miliband of the International Rescue Committee talks with us about some of the implications of the ban for refugees, organizations, and the West's reputation. 
  • After promising before the election that they would repeal the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare, with great haste, Republicans have backed off that timeline. Now they're proposing a multitude of replacement plans -- or are they "repair" plans? WNYC Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich helps us sort them all out. 
  • Could you, in 2017, make a living at the same work your parents did a generation ago? We asked listeners to tell us, and your answers reveal an America in which many jobs simply no longer exist as a viable route to financial stability and security. 
  • People protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline have been closing their accounts at banks doing business with the project. Now, the City of Seattle has decided to do the same. In a unanimous vote earlier this week, the city council agreed it will cut ties with Wells Fargo. We spoke with council member Kshama Sawant about what that means for Seattle as well as other cities and states who could make similar decisions. 
  • New CIA chief Mike Pompeo is in Turkey to meet with officials there on a trip that apparently was not meant to be publicized. BuzzFeed Middle East correspondent Borzou Daragahi speaks with us about the trip and what it means for Turkey-US relations, especially as they pertain to fighting ISIS.
  • In the recent presidential election, many young working-class people, especially white ones, revealed a distrust of a US economic system that often leaves them out. Some people were surprised, but Jennifer Silva, an assistant professor of sociology at Bucknell, wrote about this phenomenon years ago. She joins us to talk about the ways in which institutions are failing Americans, especially those without excess family resources to rely on. 
  • Around the same time that Silva was conducting her field research, presidential candidate Barack Obama was tapping into an extraordinary amount of energy, especially from young Americans. He built a movement and a volunteer network that was essentially without precedent. After the election, that movement was going to continue to change the world. Until it didn't. Author Micah Sifry joins us to explain how all of that was squandered. 

 



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Yemen Bans Raids, Media Coverage of Terrorism, Warren Silenced in the Senate

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Feb 08, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Following a botched by US forces there, Yemen has suspended ground operations by US special operations forces. The Jan. 29 raid, which the Trump administration called a success, resulted in the death of one Navy SEAL operator as well as many civilians, including children. Eric Schmitt of The New York Times joins us to discuss the latest. 
  • The media actually does fail to cover dozens of terrorist attacks -- the ones that happen in the Muslim world. Karen Greenberg, the director of Fordham Law School's Center on National Security joins us to discuss why these attacks receive less attention than ones in the Western world.
  • Betsy DeVos steps into the job as Secretary of Education with public school enrollment at an all time high, over 50 million kids. But DeVos is a strong advocate for charter schools, which enroll a twentieth as many students. Liz Willen, editor of The Hechinger Report, says there are some misconceptions to clear up in order to understand the future of education under the Trump administration. 
  • During debate on the nomination of Jeff Sessions for Attorney General, Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell forced Elizabeth Warren to stop reading a 1986 letter to the Senate from Coretta Scott King. He invoked a little-used rule forbidding Senators from impugning a fellow member of the body. Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich explains.
  • Tech policy reporter Cecilia Kang of The New York Times explains some of the coming changes from the FCC. Chairman Ajit Pai has already released a dozen actions to dismantle consumer protection rules, and has shunned the idea that the internet is a public utility. 
  • Pai has said that one of his main goals since being elevated to chairman by president Donald Trump is to close the digital divide. But last week, he blocked nine companies from proving internet service to low-income families under the Lifeline communications program. Nicol Turner-Lee of the Brookings Institution joins us to explain the history of the program as well as the implications of the FCC's latest decision. 
  • Novelist Robert Coover picks up where Mark Twain left off, bringing Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer out to "the territory" during the Civil War in his new work "Huck Out West." He joins us to explain why this time period, from the start of the Civil War to the Black Hills Gold Rush, is what made America what it is today.

 



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Travel Ban Questions Answered, Protests in Romania, The History of Today's Divide

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Feb 07, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Obama administration's top immigration lawyer, Leon Fresco, answers listener questions about the current status of the Trump administration's travel ban. The case is now in the hands of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals, where a three-judge panel will decide whether to restore the ban that had been temporarily halted by a lower federal court. 
  • Daniella Levine Cava, one of the commissioners of Miami-Dade County, joints us to discuss the implications of the decision by mayor Carlos Gimenez to cooperate with the Trump administration's executive order directing cities and counties to detain people based on immigration status, a federal concern. Not everyone in the combined city-county government thinks that move was necessary.
  •  A man exonerated after spending 27 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit got out of prison and was sent to an immigration detention facility. Now Jules Letemps faces deportation to Haiti, a country he fled in 1981, because of a minor drug offense in his past. Reporter Christie Thompson of The Marshall Project discusses his case.
  • Betsy DeVos faces strong opposition in the Senate to her nomination as Education Secretary, and Vice President Mike Pence is expected to be needed to break a tie to confirm her. The Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the latest from the Senate.  
  • In the first weeks of his presidency, Donald Trump has mostly focused on policies concerning Europe and the Middle East. Notably absent from the list has been China. Orville Schell, director of the Asia Society's Center on US-China relations, assesses the state of US-China relations. 
  • Author Nicholas Guyatt has a new way of looking at how the history of segregation informs current divisions in American society, including analogies that can be drawn from the very first attempt to solve America's racial problems. 


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Dismantling Dodd Frank, Violence in Ukraine, The Increasing Reach of the FBI

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Feb 06, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • In an executive order announced Friday, President Trump has begun the process of dismantling the Dodd Frank Act which regulates bank lending. It’s one of many rollbacks on the Obama administration’s financial regulations that is expected to be announced today.  Barney Frank, former member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Massachusetts from 1981 to 2013, was one of the law's main sponsors.
  • President Trump promised to take steps to remove himself from his business, but there continues to be no record of him doing so. Susanne Craig, reporter for The New York Times, discusses Trump's potential conflicts of interest.

  • An increase in shelling in Russian-occupied Eastern Ukraine puts pressure on Donald Trump to rethink his amiable approach to Russia. Christopher Miller, Kyiv-based correspondent for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, reports from the scene. 
  • In a new era marked by vehement resistance and protest, an investigation by The Intercept reveals the FBI's unprecedented spying powers and provides a vital glimpse into how the agency holds itself accountable to its byzantine rules and regulations.


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The Growing Left, Australia's Refugees, Florida Death Row

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Feb 03, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • At a critical moment for Democrats, what can they learn from the coordination and success the Tea Party movement had in obstructing the early part of Obama's presidency? The Takeaway speaks with Matt Kibbe, a Tea Party organizer, about how the Democrats can learn from how the Republican Party handled his movement. 
  • There are groups on the Left that might one day rival the Tea Party's energy, like the the Democratic Socialists of America, or the DSA, the members of which have tripled in about six months. Takeaway producer Oliver Lazarus attends a DSA meeting in Brooklyn.
  • Florida has executed 91 people since capital punishment was reintroduced in the United States 40 years ago, but executions were halted by the Supreme Court last January. WLRN reporter Wilson Sayre in Miami has made an audio documentary about where that has left prisoners sentenced to die by the state. 
  • We look past President Trump's anger at having to abide by a deal to accept 1,250 refugees being held by Australia to examine the conditions in which humans are being held. Kate Schuetze of Amnesty International joins us to discuss Australia's offshore detention centers in the island nation of Nauru, which human rights officials have called "cruel, inhuman and degrading."
  • Rafer Guzman joins us to talk about the weekend's movie releases, including "The Comedian," "The Space Between Us" and "The Salesman." The last film is directed by Asghar Farhadi, who is up for an Academy Award but unable to travel to the U.S. due to President Trump's immigration order banning nationals of seven countries, including Farhadi's Iran.
  • Behind the characters and unforgettable, fluorescent, candy-colored '90s look of "Saved By The Bell" was executive producer Peter Engel. The producer of other Saturday morning teen shows, as well as "Last Comic Standing" joins us to discuss his memoir about a life in television.   

 



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Israeli Settlements, Adjusting to the Immigration Ban, 'Normal' in Trump's America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Feb 02, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Last week, the Israeli parliament approved the construction of  2,500 new homes in the West Bank and over 500 in East Jerusalem. Yesterday, 3,000 more homes were authorized by the government - a growth in settlements emboldened by President Trump's strong backing of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. While tensions surrounding the settlements have risen dramatically in recent years, their development dates back to 1967. Filmmaker Shimon Dotan traces that history in his documentary "The Settlers," in which he examines how a small number of initial settlements permitted by Israeli officials paved the way for roughly 400,000 settlers living in the West Bank today. Dotan discusses a situation that he believes is on the verge of becoming catastrophic.
  • Sana Mustafa is a 25-year old Syrian refugee, having been forced to seek asylum after her father was detained by the Assad regime. She arrived in the U.S. in 2013, eventually earning a scholarship to Bard College. The rest of her family has been attempting to resettle here, as well. But with the Trump administration's immigration orders, that reunion is now on unstable ground. 
  • Defense Secretary James Mattis landed in Seoul today to meet with South Korean and Japanese officials, his first overseas trip. The focus will be on U.S.-Asia alliances, a relationship Mattis stressed during his confirmation hearings. Bonnie Glaser, senior advisor for Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, discusses the significance of Secretary Mattis’s visit and what’s at stake for U.S.-Asia relations.

  • While the dramatized Supreme Court nominations, executive order signings, and cabinet hearings attract the headlines, Republican leaders are quietly rolling back a number of Obama regulations, using a little-known law called the Congressional Review ActTodd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, discusses what regulations will be the first to go. 

  • This past Monday, more than 1,700 Flint, Michigan, residents filed a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency. The plaintiffs are seeking over $770 million in damages and are attempting to gain class action status for their claims. According to the EPA, the lead levels in Flint's water have receded to the point that they are below the levels considered dangerous to drink. However, residents remain skeptical. Jan Burgess, lead plaintiff of the case, and Julie Hurwitz, civil rights attorney, discuss the case, and how it could set a precedent for other towns dealing with similar crises. 
  • A conversation on Wednesday's program ignited a discussion about what "normal" means in America today. Norm Crider, a marine corps veteran and supporter of the Trump policy on immigration and refugees, referenced "the normal culture of America." Many listeners reacted strongly, but the reality is that many people in America feel the same way that Mr. Crider does. Hussein Rashid, professor of religion at Hofstra University and a Truman National Security Fellow, and Jerusha Lamptey, professor at Union Theological Seminary and author of the book "Never Wholly Other," discuss that sentiment, and how Muslim immigrants meet and adjust to certain expectations of "normalcy" in America. 



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02/01/17: Neil Gorsuch is SCOTUS Nominee, A Non-Veteran Leads the VA, Transgender Boy Scouts

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Feb 01, 2017


On today's show:

  • Donald Trump nominates Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court of the United States. Gorsuch, the youngest nominee in a quarter century, is a great admirer of the late Antonin Scalia and shares his legal philosophy. Eric Citron, a partner at Goldstein & Russell and a former clerk to justices O'Connor and Kagan, gives legal analysis on the nomination.
  • Despite the widespread criticism of Trump's immigration ban among politicians and protesters, polls indicate that a majority of Americans support the measure. Norm Crider is one of them. He is a Marine Corps veteran, a Trump supporter and in favor of the ban. He explains why in this segment.
  • Dr. David Shulkin is favored to become the next Secretary of Veteran Affairs. If confirmed, he will be the first Obama holdover in the Trump White House and the first non-veteran to lead the VA. Bobbie O'Brien, a reporter/producer covering veterans and military affairs for WUSF, talks about the unique challenges he will face. 
  • As part of the #100Days100Qs series with our partner PRI, listeners are tweeting us their suggested questions and we're asking the president. Donald Trump hasn't answered yet but Todd Zwillich joins to tell us what he might say.
  • The Boy Scouts of America have faced heavy criticism in recent years for what civil rights advocates says is a lack of inclusiveness. In 2013 they opened their doors to gay scouts for the first time and in 2015 they began to allow gay scout leaders. On Monday, the Boy Scouts took it one step further announcing that transgender boy scouts are now welcome in their ranks. Scott Leadingham, a journalist and editor at Quill Magazine at the Society of Professional Journalists and a longtime Eagle Scout is joined by Kristie Maldonado, a New Jersey mother who filed a complaint on behalf of her 8-year-old son Joe Maldonado.
  • Author Paul Beatty imagined a world where segregation is reintroduced into society. Today, that vision doesn't seem quite as far off as when he published "The Sellout" in 2015. The book became the first by an American author to receive the U.K. Man Booker Prize.


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01/31/17: Immigration Ban: The Republican Response, the Christian Response, and the Complexities of Digital Security

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 31, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • 60 Republican lawmakers have expressed reservations or declined to fully support Trump's immigration ban. One of them is Congressman Leonard Lance from New Jersey's 7th district. He believes the order was rushed and poorly implemented.
  • The Pope family has been living off the land in Loyal, Oklahoma since 1902. Farm life has never been easy but in today’s world it’s even more difficult to make ends meet on a family owned farm, and for the Pope’s that means farming and ranching but also oil and gas.  The Takeaway traveled to the center of the country to take the nation's pulse.

  • Manoush Zomorodi, host of Note To Self, presents "The Privacy Paradox,” an audience engagement series that unpacks one of the greatest dilemmas we face in our wired-up world: how to stay connected without feeling intruded upon by our services and software.
  • Despite a measure in Trump's immigration ban that would prioritize Christian refugees, many Christian leaders are speaking out against the ban. Jennifer Smyers, Director of Policy and Advocacy for the Immigration and Refugee Program of the Church World Service shares that perspective.
  • Notable billionaire Warren Buffett eats McDonald's for breakfast. That's one of many facts revealed about "The Oracle of Omaha" in Peter Kunhardt's new documentary, "Becoming Warren Buffett." Susie Buffett talks about her father and the new documentary in this segment.

     



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01/30/17: Trump's Immigration Ban, Security Council Shakeup, NATO Reckons With Russia

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 30, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • President Trump's executive order banning Syrian refugees and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim nations sparked confusion and outrage this weekend, as travelers were left stranded at airports, protesters took to the streets and a federal judge ruling prompted the White House to roll back part of the order. Attorney and former immigration judge Eliza Klein examines the order and where it stands now.
  • In a restructuring of the National Security Council, Director of National Intelligence and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff will face diminished roles while Trump’s Chief Strategist Stephen Bannon will join the national security group. Matthew Waxman, co-chair of the Cybersecurity Center at the Columbia Data Science Institute explains what this means for security.

  • Six people are dead and eight wounded following a shooting at an Islamic center in Quebec City Sunday night, a day after Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomed refugees into his country "regardless of faith." Allan Woods, Quebec Bureau Chief for the Toronto Star, reports.
  • Congressional leaders are among those divided over President Trump's immigration ban, including Senators Lindsey Graham and John McCain. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich reports.
  • As Trump continues to pursue warming relations with Putin, NATO warns that elevating the Russian president to global superpower status could have negative consequences for the organization. Former deputy commander of NATO Sir Richard Shirreff explains.
  • Timothy Tyson chronicles the life and death of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old boy from Chicago, whose murder launched the civil rights movement. The new book, "The Blood of Emmett Till," comes out tomorrow.

     



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1/27/2017: Understanding Mike Pence, Hugh Hewitt on Trump, Weekend Movies

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Jan 27, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Today, Vice President Mike Pence will be attending the March for Life, becoming the highest ranking official to ever speak in person there. Maureen Groppe, a reporter for The Indianapolis Star's Washington bureau, interviewed Vice President Pence earlier this month. We speak with Groppe about Mike Pence's role as the face of conservative social values in the Trump White House, and the influence he can be expected to have within the administration.
  • Over the course of the presidential campaign, conservative talk radio host Hugh Hewitt spoke to President Trump more than a dozen times on his program. While he wasn't a Trump supporter from the start, he describes his personal evolution as one that left him "wearing Trump tattoos at the end of the campaign." Hewitt describes how Trump revitalized an unwitting Republican Party, and what it means for the future of the GOP. 

  • For decades, during times of injustice, unfairness, and power over people, millions have been called to protest - and to come up with songs that describe that experience. Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker does a deep dive on the genre, and recommends two new compilations of protest songs for the Trump administration. 

  • Every Friday, Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, drops by to review the new releases hitting the box office. This week, Rafer reviews the family-friendly dog movie "A Dog's Purpose"; "Gold," featuring Matthew McConaughey as a rogue prospector; and "Paterson", a film by Jim Jarmusch about a poetic bus driver in small-town America featuring Adam Driver and Golshifteh Farahani. 

  • British Prime Minister Theresa May will become the first world leader to meet with President Donald Trump today. Gisela Stuart, a Labour Member of Parliament who was a leading figure in the Vote Leave Brexit campaign in Britain, discusses the expectations for May's visit in the U.K., where many are wary of the Trump presidency. 

  • For forty years, North Carolina ran one of the largest and most aggressive sterilization programs in the United States. A new documentary out this weekend, "State of Eugenics," by Dawn Sinclair Shapiro explores North Carolina's efforts to find and recognize survivors of the state's eugenics program and the bipartisan partnership between two North Carolina lawmakers to get compensation for the victims.

    Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.


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01/26/17: Immigrants Under Trump, Tribal Power in Oklahoma, The Unspoken Trauma of Gun Violence

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Jan 26, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • President Donald Trump is continuing his focus on national security this week with an expected executive order today that blocks Syrian refugees indefinitely from entering the U.S., and significantly cuts down on the number of refugees allowed into the country. These policies are not abstract for many living in the United States. Trita Parsi, founder and president of the National Iranian American Council, and Mark Doss, supervising attorney at the International Refugee Assistance Project, share their stories and perspective.  
  • There are over 330,000 Native Americans in the state of Oklahoma, with 38 federally recognized tribes - the second largest Native American population in the country second to California. As some of the tribes are becoming more prosperous, they are beginning to assert their power in the state. Logan Layden, reporter with State Impact Oklahoma, discusses how tribes in the state are looking to finally have their voices and interests heard. Alfreda Doonkeen, a member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, describes some of the persistent problems faced by the tribes in the state. 

  • WLRN in Miami, Florida has compiled a 12-part series, "Young Survivors: The Unspoken Trauma of Gun Violence," highlighting the often hidden impacts of gun violence in the city. The mother of a 17-year-old shooting victim, Shanta Grant, recounts the evening her son walked out the door and the phone call no parent wants to get. Reporter Sammy Mack discusses how the effects of gun violence manifest in communities and families for generations. 

  • Mary Tyler Moore died on Wednesday at the age of 80. Kristen Meinzer, a senior producer for Panoply and former Takeaway producer and host of the Movie Date podcast at WNYC, traces Moore's career and life, and how she changed entertainment. 

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/25/17: Executive Actions on Immigration, Budget Woes in Oklahoma City

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Jan 25, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The latest news from Washington, D.C. with The Takeaway’s Todd Zwillich, who discusses President Donald Trump’s latest executive orders including his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and halt immigration from Muslim nations. 

  • Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett discusses his efforts to transform Oklahoma City and revitalize its downtown area. 
  • President Trump signed an executive order reopening the door for construction of the Dakota Access pipeline from North and South Dakota to Illinois, and ordered the completion of the Keystone XL pipeline. Tara Houska, national campaigns director for Honor the Earth and a tribal attorney considers what these latest actions will mean for the tribes of the Dakotas. 
  • Lawmakers in Oklahoma are grappling with a 900 million dollar budget shortfall.  The crisis is impacting the lives of Oklahomans across the state. Oklahoma Representative Leslie Osborn is the chair of Oklahoma’s House Appropriations Committee and discusses efforts to correct the state’s budget shortfall. 
  • Emily Wendler, a reporter with KOSU in Oklahoma City, discusses the tough choices local public schools are facing as they grapple with a funding crisis. And Don Wentworth, a former public school principal, discusses the significant challenges for public schools from the perspective of an educator. 

  • Leo Guevara, a Mexican immigrant and small business owner in Oklahoma City discusses his concerns about the immigration policy promises of President Donald Trump and how it's already impacting his business. 

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/24/17: Horror in Oklahoma, Trump Tackles TPP, The Brutality of Slavery

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 24, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Takeaway visits Cushing, Oklahoma, the pipeline crossroads of the world. It’s here that the market price for oil is set. It’s also a town that’s been experiencing a shakeup, literally. On November 7th, 2016, a 5.8 magnitude earthquake hit Cushing — a record for Oklahoma. Here to weigh in is Bob Noltensmeyer, Cushing emergency manager and a local business owner. 
  • Residents in the Sooner State hope that Oklahoma will play a large role in the U.S. and global energy market under President Trump. Joe Wertz, a reporter for State Impact Oklahoma, explains.
  • J.D. Strong — head of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, former director of the Water Resources Board and former Oklahoma secretary of the environment — has worked with Scott Pruitt, Donald Trump's EPA pick, for the past six years. Strong doesn't believe Pruitt is out to destroy the EPA, but he wants to bring more balance between state and federal government influence when it comes to protecting the environment.
  • President Trump has been busy signing executive orders and confirming cabinet members. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us up to speed on the latest from the Beltway.
  • Former President Barack Obama worked hard to fast-track the Trans Pacific Partnership with dozens of countries. But on Monday, President Trump signed an executive order to withdraw from the TPP and says he will also overhaul the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico. Ian Lee, a professor of strategic management and international business at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, explains how Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may approach the negotiations.
  • Ziva Branstetter, editor-in-chief of the Oklahoma-based non-profit news service The Frontier, and Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, look at corruption within the sheriff’s office and prison system in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where inmate deaths and severe incidents of prisoner abuse are commonplace.
  • In a new book, "The Price for Their Pound of Flesh," author Daina Ramey Berry puts a price tag on slavery, and explores how slaves were used as commodities through every stage of life in early America. Ramey Berry is also a professor of history at University of Texas at Austin.

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/23/17: Red State Skepticism, Why Women March, Lessons for President Trump

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 23, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Though Oklahoma is a decidedly red state, there is some serious skepticism about President Donald Trump — perhaps the biggest conservative change agent in American politics in two generations. The Takeaway hears from five people in the Sooner State as we broadcast from KOSU in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 
  • About 500,000 people attended this weekend's Women's March on Washington, and sister marches across the world drew up to 2 million people. Ellen Pogemiller, an Oklahoma City Women's March participant who works for a local non-profit, weighs in on this changing moment in American politics.

  • After 22 years in power, Gambian President Yahya Jammeh fled into exile over the weekend after finally admitting defeat by challenger Adama Barrow in the country's most recent election. Jammeh defied the international community and his own military over the past two weeks, but he has finally vacated the office. Dionne Searcey, the West Africa bureau chief for our partner The New York Times, has the details. 
  • Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes swept through Georgia and Mississippi over the weekend. So far, authorities have confirmed that at least 18 people have been killed and dozens more are injured. Bill Bunting, the chief of Forecast Operations for the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center, gives us an update on the crisis playing out in the southeast.
  • Kit Roane and Sarah Weiser, producers with the Retro Report documentary team, look back at the legacy of marine biologist Rachel Carson, who warned of the dangers of pesticides in her book "Silent Spring." 
  • The nation’s 45th president may have promised to shake things up in Washington once he was sworn in, but how much can he really change? Martha Kumar, director of the White House Transition Project, answers.

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/20/2017: A New Era in American Politics Begins

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Jan 20, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich analyzes the inauguration of President Donald Trump, along with Carolyn Ryan, senior editor for politics at The New York Times, and Glenn Coffee, a member of the Oklahoma State Senate from 1999-2011, and former Oklahoma secretary of state from 2011-2013.
  • Shirl St. Germain, a former restaurant owner in Marco Island, Florida, and Kevin Lonie, a salesman from Manchester, New Hampshire, are both supporters of President Donald Trump. They join The Takeaway discuss their hopes for the 45th president. 

  • Former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft and Republican consultant Roger Stone join The Takeaway to reflect on Donald Trump’s inauguration, and what he's likely first steps will be after taking office.
  • California Representative Barbara Lee is one of 66 Democrats who will be boycotting Donald Trump's inauguration. Lee says she will be “organizing and preparing for resistance” in lieu of attending the event.
  • President Donald Trump’s team was reportedly having difficulties booking musical guests for inaugural events. But one band is on board. Country act Tim Rushlow and his Big Band performed Thursday evening at the Make America Great Again Welcome Celebration at the Lincoln Memorial, and they'll also perform a song for the first couple’s first dance Friday evening. 
  • Charlie Brotman is known for announcing the U.S. presidential inaugural parades. For 67 years, he has delivered the announcement for 11 presidents, beginning with Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1957 through President Obama in 2013. He was replaced this year by Trump supporter and radio host Steve Ray. He joins The Takeaway to reflect on today's inauguration. 
  • The day after the inauguration, hundreds of thousands are expected to converge on D.C. for the Women’s March on Washington to demonstrate against the new administration. Two of the organizers behind the march — Breanne Butler and Nantasha Williams — weigh in today on The Takeaway. 
  • President Donald Trump in keeping with his unconventional tactics and has decided to forego a poet laureate for his inauguration ceremony. We explore poetry and politics with Richard Blanco, the 2013 inaugural poet.

 



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01/19/17: Climate Concerns, Inauguration Excitement, Guns in the Obama Era

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Jan 19, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Today is the last day of Senate confirmation hearings for before Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us from the Capitol to recap yesterday's hearings and to explain what to expect from today's proceedings. 
  • If confirmed, Scott Pruitt, Donald Trump's nominee to head the EPA, may reverse much of President Obama's environmental legacy, including signing a global agreement to reduce climate emissions. Bill McKibben, an environmentalist, co-founder of 350.org, and a scholar in residence at Middlebury College, explains what Trump's EPA can and cannot do. 
  • Hundreds of thousands of Americans are flocking to Washington D.C. for the swearing-in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. While some are going to protest, others will be heading to the nation's capital to celebrate, including Blake Roderick of Pittsfield, Illinois. He discusses his upcoming and his expectations for the incoming administration.
  • As Barack Obama prepares to leave office with his highest approval rating since assuming the presidency, Takeaway listeners from across the United States weigh in on his legacy.
  • Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-NY) and Sandro Galea, dean at the Boston University School of Public Health, look back at President Barack Obama’s legacy on gun control and why, despite the horrific mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, he wasn’t able to bring about the kind of changes he hoped for.
  • Barack Obama made history when he mobilized young people and campaigners in 2008. We talk with three volunteers who campaigned for Obama as college students — Lauren Wyatt, Molly Rivera, and Jose Torrez — and ask them to reflect on the current state of politics today. 

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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01/18/17: America in Perpetual War, Freeing Chelsea Manning, A First Lady's Farewell

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Jan 18, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Tuesday, President Obama announced that he would be commuting the sentence of army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning, along with the sentences of more than 200 other inmates. He also pardoned 64 individuals, including retired Marine General James Cartwright. Mark Osler, a former federal prosecutor and a law professor at the University of St. Thomas, has the details. 
  • Barack Obama's term in office is quickly coming to an end, but people are still hoping he can change their lives with a presidential pardon. Ravi Ragbir is one of those people. He weighs in along with Alina Das, law professor and co-director the Immigrants Rights Clinic at New York University.
  • On Wednesday, the Supreme Court hears oral arguments in Ziglar v. Abbasi, a civil rights lawsuit filed in 2002 on behalf of Muslim, South Asian, and Arab citizens who were swept up by the FBI during investigations into 9/11. Stephen Vladeck, a professor at the University of Texas School of Law, unpacks the case. 
  • There are a handful of major confirmation hearings on Wednesday, including Tom Price, the president-elect's choice for secretary of health and human services, Nikki Haley for U.N. ambassador and Scott Pruitt as administrator of the EPA. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what to expect from the hearings. 

Subscribe to The Takeaway's podcast using iTunes or your favorite podcast client so you'll always have the latest episode. Get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.



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School Politics, Pioneering Women, Obama's Foreign Policy Legacy

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 17, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Betsy DeVos, President-elect Donald Trump's pick for secretary of education, goes before the Senate today. Defenders of DeVos say her efforts to disrupt the educational establishment can only improve graduation rates across the country. But many opponents have concerns that she will use her wealth to entice states to take money away from public schools.  James Goenner, president and chief executive of the National Charter Schools Institute, and Diane Ravitch, a former assistant secretary of education under President George H.W. Bush, weigh in.
  • Over the weekend, Democrats and activists rallied to fight the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, discusses the lesser-known provisions that could be lost under a repeal.
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May delivered a landmark address on Tuesday on the U.K.'s plan to leave the European Union. During her speech, she rejected partial membership in the E.U. and said the United Kingdom would "not seek membership of the single market but the greatest possible access to it." Robin Wigglesworth, U.S. markets editor for The Financial Times, explains. 
  • Today, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Lynch v. Dimaya, an immigration case that will consider whether part of the definition of “crime of violence,” which makes individuals deportable, is unconstitutionally vague. The case involves a man from the Philippines who was convicted of burglary. Pratheepan Gulasekaram, a law professor at Santa Clara University, hast the details. 
  • As the nation’s capital prepares to host tens of thousands of women for the Women’s March on Washington, we look back at a number of female trailblazers with Julie Scelfo, journalist and author of "The Women Who Made New York."
  • Is the United States stronger or weaker because of President Obama's foreign policy decisions? For answers, we turn to Susan Glasser, foreign affairs columnist at POLITICO, and Steve Clemons, Washington editor-at-large for The Atlantic.

 



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Obama's Cultural Impact, Alec Baldwin on Playing Trump, John Kerry's Legacy

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 16, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • How will history view President Obama’s efforts to reform the criminal justice system? We look back at his successes and failures with Glenn E. Martin, president and founder of the advocacy group JustLeadershipUSA.
  • John Kerry will take his last lap as secretary of state this week. He visited Paris over the weekend for Middle East peace talks, and will head to London today to meet with his U.K. Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson. Jonathan Marcus, diplomatic correspondent for the BBC, explores Kerry's legacy. 
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for The Guardian, TIME, and The Takeaway, looks back at Barack Obama's cultural legacy as the 44th president prepares to leave office. 
  • President Obama dedicated a number of new national monuments on Thursday that aim to preserve the country's civil rights history. Khalil Muhammad, professor of history, race, and public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the author of "The Condemnation of Blackness," looks at the significance of these monuments on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. 
  • Last week, The Takeaway spoke with actor and activist Alec Baldwin about his fight to shut down the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant just north of New York City. Today, Baldwin weighs in on the election and the role as President-elect Donald Trump on "Saturday Night Live." 
  • Cornell Belcher is the author of "A Black Man In The White House" and was a lead pollster for the Democratic National Committee under Howard Dean. He was also a member of President Obama’s polling team for both the 2008 and 2012 campaigns, and speaks with Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich about the racial politics that divide the country today.


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Investigating the FBI, Actor Alec Baldwin, Fighting for LGBT Equality

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Jan 13, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Justice Department inspector general announced Thursday that he would investigate the DOJ and the FBI, and whether FBI Director James Comey followed official policy during the department’s investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails in the months leading up to the election. Michael Bromwich, the former inspector general for the Department of Justice, weighs in. 
  • Cubans coming to the U.S. will no longer be granted automatic residency under new rules announced yesterday by the Obama Administration. Tim Padgett, the Americas correspondent for public radio station WLRN in Miami, has the details.

  • Yesterday, the EPA accused Fiat Chrysler of cheating on emissions tests. The company allegedly used secret software that allowed more than 100,000 diesel vehicles to emit illegal pollutant levels, something that the EPA calls "a clear and serious violation of the Clean Air Act." John Stoll, global auto editor for The Wall Street Journal in Detroit, explains what this could med for the company and consumers. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, drops by to review the big new releases hitting the box office this weekend, including the animated children's film "Monster Trucks," and the horror flick "The Bye Bye Man."
  • Actor Alec Baldwin and activist Paul Gallay, president of the advocacy group Riverkeeper, discuss the closing of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant in New York, and the future of renewable energy sources in the Empire State and beyond. 
  • A new documentary, "Growing Up Coy," tells the story of a young Colorado family fighting for their 6-year-old transgender daughter’s right to use the girls' bathroom at her elementary school. Coy Mathis' case is one of the first in the nation that specifically addresses transgender bathroom rights. The Takeaway hears from Eric Juhola, director and producer of the film, and Jeremy Stulberg, the producer and editor of "Growing Up Coy."
  • Heather Cronk, the former co-director of GetEQUAL, a national LGBTQ organizing network, examine's President Barack Obama's legacy on gay marriage, transgender rights, and LGBT discrimination. 


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Putin Frenzy, Blowback in Baltimore, Class Warfare

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Jan 12, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • How are lawmakers responding to recent allegations surrounding Russian interference in the U.S. election, and how will they hold the government and intelligence communities accountable to the American people? Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA), the ranking member of the CIA Subcommittee of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, answers. 
  • Journalist Glenn Greenwald, co-founder of the investigative news outlet The Intercept, responds to recent allegations of Russian interference in the U.S. election, and the legacy President Obama is leaving on surveillance policies.
  • Kathy Rittereiser did not vote for President-elect Donald Trump, but she is in favor of his plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. We find out what her concerns are with her current law, and what she hopes the replacement will include.
  • Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings up to speed on a busy week of Senate confirmation hearings, and what the GOP is planning when it comes to repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act.
  • Former presidential candidate Ben Carson, Donald Trump's pick for secretary of housing and urban development, goes before the Senate today for his confirmation hearing. Timothy McDaniel, an attorney and Carson's childhood friend, reflects on Carson's upbringing and how he may operate as HUD secretary. 
  • Attorney General Loretta Lynch will be in Baltimore on Thursday to speak on community policing and announce that the city has come to an agreement with the federal government on a consent decree for reform to the police department. With the state’s attorney, Marilyn Mosby, under fire for her handling of the Freddie Gray prosecutions, what does the future hold for the city of Baltimore and its police force? Marc Steiner, president and executive producer of the Center for Emerging Media and host of the Marc Steiner Show on WEAA-FM in Baltimore, weighs in. 

 



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Obama's Farewell, Russian Secrets and Trump, Military Brutality

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Jan 11, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Barack Obama delivered his final speech as president from his home city of Chicago on Tuesday night. Though he offered hope for the future, the violence plaguing the Windy City lurked in the shadows of his address. Ja’Mal Green, a community organizer and activist in Chicago, weighs in. 
  • Rex Tillerson, the former chairman and CEO of Exxon Mobil and President-elect Donald Trump's choice for secretary of state, will testify before the Senate during a confirmation hearing today. Suzanne Maloney, a former Middle East advisor for ExxonMobil and currently the deputy director of the Foreign Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, explains why Tillerson should be confirmed. 
  • An explosive but unsubstantiated report on Donald Trump and his ties to Russia is raising new questions about the president-elect’s connections to the Kremlin. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains.
  • On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Endrew V. Douglas County School District, a suit brought by a Colorado couple who claim their autistic son was not provided an adequate education in the public school system. Wayne Steedman, a senior partner with The Steedman Law Group, has over 24 years of experience as a special education attorney and examines the case.
  • On Tuesday, Dylann Roof was sentenced to death for killing nine worshippers at the Emanuel AME Church. Meg Kinnard, legal affairs reporter for the Associated Press in South Carolina, discusses Roof's sentence and explains how family members are reacting. 
  • A two and a half year investigation by The Intercept reveals a pattern of violence and abuse employed by the widely praised Seal Team 6 — the unit responsible for killing Osama bin Laden in 2011. For details on this story we turn to Matthew Cole, a reporter for The Intercept.


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Evaluating Trump's AG Pick, Unrest in Mexico, A Homeless Crisis in The Golden State

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 10, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Tuesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee will begin to hold confirmation hearings for Senator Jeff Sessions, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general. Janai Nelson, associate director-counsel of NAACP Legal, and J.D. Gordon, a former Pentagon spokesman and security and foreign policy advisor to Donald Trump's presidential campaign, examine Sessions' record. 
  • On Monday, President-elect Donald Trump announced that he would appoint his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as senior White House advisor. Norm Eisen, President Obama's White House ethics czar from 2009 to 2011 and a fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, weighs in on the potential conflicts of interest facing Kushner and Trump.
  • A double digit increase in gas prices has led to looting and protests in Mexico, and the Trump Administration’s plans to put more economic pressure on Mexico could make the situation worse and the border more difficult to protect. Elisabeth Malkin, Mexico reporter for our partners at The New York Times, weighs in. 
  • Officials estimates there are at least 6,700 homeless people living in San Francisco. The mayor and city leaders have tried lots of things to combat homelessness, but the city's homeless population has remained steady for a decade. Why has nothing worked? Kevin Fagan, a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle specializing in homelessness, weighs in.
  • The new mayor of Sacramento, California has big plans for reducing homelessness and addressing mental health issues. Many are optimistic about what he’ll accomplish, but there’s still plenty standing in his way. Darrell Steinberg, the new mayor of Sacramento, discusses his plan today on The Takeaway.
  • Today The Takeaway examines the story of Phillip Chance, a black man who died November 8th in an Alabama hospital. His decades-long journey through the criminal justice system is an epic story of missed opportunities, political grandstanding, and bad timing. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, and Jade Chance, Phillip's eldest daughter, weigh in. 


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China Goes Green, A Refugee Fight in Vermont, Actress Kristin Davis

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 09, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • Last Friday, the FBI, the CIA, and the NSA released a declassified report that concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin "ordered an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the U.S. presidential election.” David Sanger, national security correspondent for our partners at The New York Times, has the details. 
  • On Friday, Esteban Santiago, a 26-year-old Iraq War veteran, opened fire at Fort Lauderdale International Airport and killed five people. Santiago, who allegedly sought help for mental problems weeks ago, will make his first appearance in court today. For more on this story we turn to Davie Ovalle, who has been covering the story for the Miami Herald.

  • President-elect Donald Trump says he will build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, though questions about who will pay for it are still up in the air. How will the wall affect people who own property on the Rio Grande? Travis Bubenik, a reporter with Marfa Public Radio in Texas, weighs in. 
  • In an unusual move, Donald Trump's transition team issued an order stating that all politically appointed American ambassadors need to leave their posts by Inauguration Day, with no grace period. W. Robert Pearson, ambassador to Turkey between 2000 and 2003, and currently a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington, joins The Takeaway to discuss the coming transition. 
  • China plans to spend more than $360 billion on renewable power sources and expects to dominate the renewable energy sector by 2020. Sam Geall, the executive editor of Chinadialogue and a research fellow at the Science Policy Research Unit, joins us to discuss the impact of China's latest announcement and how the nation may shape age of renewable energy going forward.
  • The small city of Rutland, Vermont is making plans to welcome 100 Syrian and Iraqi refugees this month. But the issue has sharply divided its residents. Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras weighs in. 
  • Journalist Rebecca Carroll speaks with actress Kristin Davis. Davis, who is white, adopted a black daughter, and discusses her experience with race in America. 


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Obamanomics, A Vietnam War Legacy, The Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds Connection

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Jan 06, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The final jobs report of Barack Obama’s presidency will be released today. We look at the progress and economic setbacks he’s had over the last eight years with Kenneth Rogoff, a professor of economics at Harvard and a former chief economist with the International Monetary Fund, and Gillian Tett, U.S. managing editor of the Financial Times.
  • According to the United Nations, more than 7,000 have been killed in the Yemeni civil war since March 2015, and there are reports that around 2.2 million children are suffering from severe malnutrition as a result of the ongoing conflict. Adam Baron, a visiting fellow with the European Council on Foreign Relations and researcher at the Institute for Social Anthropology, weighs in.
  • Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker discusses the TV shows you should be watching, including "This Is Us," "Girls," "Homeland," and "Planet Earth II." Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, offers a preview of the 2017 Golden Globe awards, which kick off this Sunday. 
  • In 1967, journalist Harrison Salisbury changed the way Americans viewed the Vietnam War and exposed the gap between political speak and public access to information. We explore how Salisbury forever changed U.S. politics with rare audio from the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.
  • Filmmaker Fisher Stevens discusses his new HBO film, "Bright Lights," which is an intimate look into the personal relationship between Debbie Reynolds and her daughter, Carrie Fisher.  


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The Fighting Feminist, The Keyboard Army, The Defiant Optimist

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Jan 05, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • The Senate Armed Services Committee holds their first hearing on alleged Russian hacking today, despite persistent skepticism from President-elect Donald Trump. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has the details.
  • This week, three notable writers announced plans to leave Twitter. Among them is feminist writer Lindy West, who has long said that the social media service hasn’t done enough to reign in trolls. She discusses her experience today on The Takeaway. 
  • Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte allegedly had a “keyboard army” of backers in the lead up to his election, some paid and some not, who posted on social media to silence dissenters and help create the illusion that he had widespread support. Sean Williams, a journalist reporting for The New Republic, explains. 
  • Durreen Shahnaz was the first Bangladeshi woman to graduate from the Wharton School of Business and to work on Wall Street. She launched the Impact Investment Exchange Asia in 2013 — the social stock exchange is going strong today and has funded a number of projects, including an initiative to convert power plants in Cambodia from diesel to biofuel. 
  • The sentencing trial for Dylann Roof is set to continue today with more than 30 witnesses testifying for federal attorneys. Jennifer Berry Hawes, a reporter The Post and Courier in South Carolina and author of an upcoming book about the Emanuel AME Church shooting, and Professor John Blume of Cornell Law School, weigh in on the trial and what's next. 
  • Republicans have vowed to repeal and replace the Affordable Health Care Act. That makes Jacob Atkins, who is HIV positive, very nervous. He shares his story along with Mehgan McCarthy, a healthcare coordinator who helped Atkins navigate the insurance exchanges and get coverage through Obamacare.


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Obamacare Up in Smoke, Ford Challenges Trump, Fighting Terror With Music

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Jan 04, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • As Republicans rally to repeal Obamacare, The Takeaway considers the future of the Affordable Care Act with Jonathan Gruber, one of the architects of the ACA and an economics professor at MIT, and Ren?e Landers, a professor of law at Suffolk University.
  • On Tuesday, the Ford Motor Company announced that it was scrapping plans to build a new manufacturing plant in Mexico. The decision comes amid criticism from the Trump administration, but Ford says the decision was not made because of political pressure. Joe Hinrichs, president of the Americas at Ford Motor Company, explains. 
  • We continue our look at Chicago gun violence with a personal essay from Edwin Day, a former gang member who now works with youth to steer them away from gun violence.
  • Diagnosed at the age of 17 with epilepsy and bipolar disorder, Sitawa Wafula found few avenues for support in her home country of Kenya. She started a blog about living with mental illness and has now set up Kenya’s first free mental health support line, "My Mind, My Funk."
  • The U.N. face many challenges in the year ahead, including ending the war in Syria and continuing to address and reign in climate change. Jan Eliasson, a Swedish diplomat who served as deputy secretary-general of the United Nations from July 2012 to December 2016, reflects on the challenges ahead for the United Nations in 2017. 
  • Karim Wasfi, a renowned cellist and the conductor of the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra, uses music to heal in the face of terror. Last year, after a deadly car bomb exploded in a cafe, he sat with his cello and played amid the charred remains in protest of the violence and to “equalize” the terror with an act of creativity and beauty.


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The Top Risks of 2017, Violence in Chicago, The New Space Race

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Jan 03, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • If 2016 produced a global shift in political power, what does 2017 hold? Ian Bremmer, president and founder of the Eurasia Group, a political consulting firm, joins The Takeaway to discuss the top risks facing the world in 2017. 
  • Congress is back in session today, and lawmakers already have a full plate. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains what's on the agenda. 
  • One of the most brutal prison riots in history occurred in the Brazilian city of Manaus on Sunday. The 17 hour blood bath killed about 60 people — the riot is part of a growing cocaine turf war. Simon Romero, Brazil bureau chief for our partners at The New York Times, has the details.
  • Violence plagued Chicago in 2016, but gun deaths are still lower than they were in the 1990s. Chicago resident Seonia Owens reflects on the life and death of her son, Robert Owens, who was 15 when he was fatally shot in 1998. She joins The Takeaway with her daughter, Sharon Burgman-Owens, Robert’s older sister.
  • Children under the age of 13 were injured or killed in 41 shooting incidents last year in the city of Chicago. Patrick Smith, a reporter from member station WBEZ, has been combing through the data and explains how people in Chicago are coping with violence in the Windy City. 
  • Renewed interest in space exploration in both the private and public sectors is creating a new space race. Emily Rice, a professor of astrophysics at the College of Staten Island and the CUNY Graduate Center, and a researcher at the American Museum of Natural History, has the details. 


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Attack in Turkey, Corruption at the Department of Homeland Security, O.J. Simpson and Race in America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Jan 02, 2017


Coming up on today's show:

  • An attack on an upscale Istanbul nightclub on New Year's Eve left 39 people dead and nearly 70 wounded. This is the fourth terrorist attack in Turkey this month, and poses deep questions for a government currently enmeshed in the Syrian ceasefire. Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for BuzzFeed News, reports.
  • New York Times investigation found employees and contractors working for the Department of Homeland Security took $15 million in bribes over the last ten years. Nearly 200 workers are implicated in the controversy for allowing illegal immigrants and drugs to pass across the border unchecked, in addition to illegally selling green cards and other documents. Ron Nixon, Washington Correspondent covering homeland security for The New York Times, and James Tomsheck, former chief of internal affairs with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, discuss the investigation. 
  • The Chinese government announced on Friday that it would set a one-year timeline for banning its legal ivory trade, charting a new path in protecting elephants from extinction.  Elly Pepper, Deputy Director of the Wildlife Trade Initiative at the Natural Resources Defense Council, talks about how this ban will impact the poaching industry.
  • As part of “How I Got Over It,” Rebecca Carroll’s ongoing series of conversations about race in America, Carroll sits down with Ezra Edelman, the director of "O.J.: Made in America," a new documentary that depicts the journey of O.J. Simpson from college football star to defendant in one of America's most high profile murder cases.
  • Global events like Brexit, the Syrian civil war and the refugee crisis sparked calls for activism in 2016, and many post-election conversations have centered on how individuals can be more engaged and motivated to take action for change. Duncan Green,  author of "How Change Happens," tries to answer the question, "How do we create change in 2017?"



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The Transformation of Truth, U.S. Retaliates Against Russia, Modern Nuclear Proliferation

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 30, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The most fundamental change in 2016 has been the redefinition of truth in the minds of Americans. According  Jay Rosen, NYU professor and author of PressThink, a blog about journalism in the digital age, the rejection of facts and the politicization of truth that came to a height in 2016 is disabling serious journalism. In his latest series of blog posts, he explores what went wrong, offers some long term solutions, and looks for the bright spots in this post-fact world.
  • On Thursday, the Obama administration announced a long awaited punishment for Russian involvement in the hacking of the DNC that includes the ejection of 35 Russian intelligence operatives from the United States and new sanctions on Russia’s intelligence services. Kimberly Marten, professor of political science at Barnard College, Columbia University, sheds light on this new development. 

  • The latest discovery from Andrew Gulli of the Strand Magazine comes from the deep trove of H.G. Wells. It’s a short story called "The Haunted Ceiling," and Gulli discovered it by going through the thousands of titles in the rare books section of the University of Illinois library.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, takes a look at some of the other big releases from the month of December that are worth seeing over the holiday weekend: Hidden Figures, Silence, Lion and Sing.
  • Richard Garwinphysicist and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, is one of the designers of the first hydrogen bomb, and today he is an opponent of nuclear expansion.  He reflects on the state of nuclear proliferation today in this particularly tense moment for U.S.-Russia relations.


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Israel: A Fragile Relationship, Food Trafficking in Venezuela, A Solo Pianist Reimagines The Dead

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 29, 2016


Coming up on today's show: 

  •  On Wednesday, Secretary of State John Kerry delivered an impassioned speech from the State Department, reiterating his support for a two state solution and appearing to direct his remarks more at Israeli public opinion than the U.S. George MitchellPresident Obama’s former special envoy to the Middle East and retired Senator from Maine, shares his perspective on the history of the U.S.-Israeli relationship and what's changing today.

  • Lori Lowenthal Marcus is a lawyer and the co-chair of the Jews Choose Trump organization. She lends insight into how Jewish supporters of Donald Trump are responding to the latest upheaval in U.S.-Israeli relations, and lays out her expectations for a Trump presidency.
  •  Dave Zirin, Sports Editor for The Nation magazine, gives a recap of the year in sports and social justice from Colin Kaepernick protests, to the failures and successes of the Olympics in Brazil, to the death of Muhammad Ali.
  • An investigation by the Associated Press has found that the military is operating a major food trafficking scheme in a country with millions on the brink of starvation, operating illegal food markets and setting the price of goods. Hannah Dreier, Venezuela correspondent for The Associated Press, was part of that investigation. She shares what she found.
  • Thousands have been killed since Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte began his crackdown on drugs and drug users, but despite international condemnation, his approval ratings remain high. Reporter Aurora Almendral spent a night on patrol with the Manilla police department. She shares her experience and describes what the war on drug users and dealers looks like from the ground.
  • Pianist Holly Bowling has made a name for herself reinterpreting the music of Phish and The Grateful Dead for solo piano. She joins The Takeaway to talk about her new album Better Left Unsung, out this month.


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Gun Violence on Christmas, Judicial Vacancies for Trump, Drought in California and a Town Without Water

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Dec 28, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Former Presidential candidate Ralph Nader reflects on the health of the Democratic party in 2016, which lost more than 1,000 positions under Obama, and the future of the movement Bernie Sanders started.
  • 61 were people shot in Chicago over the holiday weekend, 11 fatally, rounding out a particularly violent year for the city whose murder rate is at its highest point since the 1990s. The surge in violence is a reminder of the failures of the city to address gun violence despite a national spotlight on the issue. Gary Slutkin, founder of Cure Violence, an anti-gun violence initiative that has seen periodic funding cuts, shares his perspective.
  • When Donald Trump takes office, he will be handed close to 100 judicial vacancies, nearly double what President Obama had when entering office. An array of openings throughout the federal and district courts will allow Trump to have a lasting impact on the composition of the courts. Russell Wheelervisiting fellow at the Brookings Institution's Governance Studies Program and an expert in the federal judicial selection process, says this could drastically change the judiciary.
  • California is in its sixth year of drought and last year's El Nino rainy season did little to help, especially in Southern California, which is far below normal precipitation totals. The drought could also play a role in a possible fight between regulation-favoring state officials like Governor Jerry Brown and President-elect Donald Trump. Jean Moran, professor in Earth and Environmental Sciences at Cal State University East Bay, explains.
  • Although California is in a drought, the Texas town of Sandbranch has not had potable water for 30 years. Residents used wells, but in the 1980s that water got contaminated. Meanwhile, Dallas is one of the wealthiest cities in the country, causing residents to wonder why the county can't help pay for running water in the town. Reverend Eugene Keahey is a pastor of Mount Zion Baptist Church who visited the town and decided to stay put.


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Israeli Settlements Push Ahead, The Next Step in Cyberdeterrence, The Loss of George Michael

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Dec 27, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In defiance of a U.N. Security Council Resolution, Israel will move ahead with plans to build thousands of new settlements in a predominantly Palestinian section of East Jerusalem. According to the U.N., the settlements are a "flagrant violation under international law." The U.S. surprisingly abstained from the vote, drawing sharp criticism from Benjamin Netanyahu and the Israeli government. Daniel Levy, president of the U.S./Middle East Project weighs in.
  • San Diego’s deep water cargo port is looking for a larger slice of the import-export market, but expansion plans could bring more than just cargo.  Nearby neighbors worry there will be extra pollution if business picks up.  Erik Anderson reports from KPBS in San Diego.
  • London is facing the worst pollution levels seen in years, with nitrogen dioxide levels higher than Beijing. We look at the failures of regulation that have led to this pollution and what can be done to fix it. Martin Williams, Professor at King's College in London and air quality scientist explains what this means for the city nicknamed "The Big Smoke."
  • This week, details surrounding the Russian hack of the DNC continued to emerge, as it became apparent that Russia’s military intelligence arm was linked to the hacking. Some security experts are calling for better cyberdeterrence as part of a more comprehensive cyber security strategy.  Chris Demchak, professor at the U.S. Naval War College and RADM Grace M. Hopper Chair of Cybersecurity, explains what that strategy might look like.
  • The United States military throws away a lot of stuff, and much of it is too dangerous to let it sit in a landfill. So how did U.S. Troops stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan dispose of their trash?  Giant burn pits operated by Kellog Brown and Root, a former subsidiary of Haliburton paid to dispose of toxic chemicals, expired Meals Ready to Eat, batteries, MK-19 rounds and DEET soaked tents. All incinerated in open landfills creating serious health hazards for troops, contractors and locals. Jennifer Percy, a contributing editor at The New Republic, talks about her new story "The Things They Burned." She's joined by Senior Master Sergeant Jessey Baca who completed two tours in Iraq and has since been diagnosed with a terminal illness.
  • The death of pop singer George Michael comes at the end of a year of particularly heavy losses in the music world. Michael Musto, a New York City Based Journalist and columnist for The Village Voice and Out.com, talks about Michael's importance to the pop world and gay culture.


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Urban Resilience: How American Cities are Innovating for The 21st Century

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Dec 26, 2016


Over the last year, The Takeaway has been exploring the idea of “urban resilience” with a number of public radio stations, including KPBS in San Diego, OPB in Portland, WDET in Detroit, and KUT in Austin. And today, as part of our year in review, we’re exploring innovation and technology in the 21st century. Here’s what you’ll find in this special episode:

  • How resilient are this nation's cities in times of stress? We put that question to Dan Zarrilli, New York City's chief resilience officer and the senior director of climate policy and programs. He oversees New York's preparedness in light of climate change predictions. Zarilli says having someone focused on climate change helps with disaster planning.
  • The small town of Borrego Springs, California is home to about 3,400 people. But as power outages roll across the Golden State, this tiny community has been able to do something few other towns have: Get off the grid entirely. Erik Anderson, a reporter for KPBS, explains.
  • The winter of 2015 was the warmest in the lower 48 states since record keeping started 121 years ago, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The world’s warming climate is already having an impact on places like Austin, Texas, according to KUT Reporter Mose Buchele.
  • The majority of U.S. cities had electricity by the 1930s, but that wasn't the case in rural parts of the country. Nowadays, many rural areas in America are still waiting for high-speed internet. Christopher Mitchell, director of Community Broadband Networks at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance in Minneapolis, Minnesota, explains what it’ll take to spread fiber optic cables across rural parts of the nation.
  • For years, environmental regulators knew Portland, Oregon had an air pollution problem. But now researchers with the U.S. Forest Service have found a way to use the city’s tree moss to test for air pollution. Cassandra Profita from Oregon Public Broadcasting hit the streets to find out more.
  • When the city of Detroit emerged from the nation’s largest-ever municipal bankruptcy two years ago, it was left with a razor-thin financial cushion. Now, Detroit’s downtown is booming with new construction, but some long-time residents — primarily African Americans — fear the investment isn’t about them. WDET’s Quinn Klinefelter explains.


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In Focus: Exploring Black Representation in Entertainment

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 23, 2016


After back to back years of #OscarsSoWhite, 2016 has opened up promising new opportunities for black Americans in entertainment. In this special episode, The Takeaway is exploring the history and rise of African-Americans in television, film, and theater. Here’s what you’ll find in today’s show:

  • Scott Heath is a cultural theorist and professor of English at Georgia State University. He says there has been a marked shift in the last several decades when it comes to the ways black stories are presented.
  • It's been 25 years since Julie Dash's film "Daughters of the Dust" was released. It was the first movie directed by an African-American woman to receive a theatrical release in the U.S., and the only film to date by a black woman that has been added to the National Film Registry. Dash explores the evolution of black women in filmmaking, and the challenges that still lie ahead.
  • Legendary producer, writer, and director Norman Lear says he wasn't aware he was making history when he first introduced a family like “The Jeffersons” in 1975, but that’s exactly what he did. He discusses how sitcoms can engage viewers on topics of race and class through social commentary.
  • The intersection of race and culture can not only entertain, but also educate and help change the lens through which history and society is viewed, according to Jennifer Nikki Kidwell and Scott Sheppard, the co-creators and performers in the thought-provoking stage play, "The Underground Railroad Game.”
  • There's been so much buzz this year about the diversity in movies and television shows, and the African American Film Critics Association is confident that the #OscarsSoWhite hashtag won’t surface again this year. Gil Robertson, co-founder and president of the African American Film Critics Association, explains.
  • Actress and singer Leslie Uggams has seen the entertainment industry change in recent decades — she’s been in show business since the age of six, and since then, she's moved seamlessly between film, television, and theater. Uggams is a cultural pioneer, a woman who saw her break-through role come in 1977 when she played the role of "Kizzy Reynolds" in the television miniseries "Roots.”
  • Thought lost for decades, work has begun recently to restore "Cane River," a little seen film by Horace Jenkins, a black director who died months after the film's premiere in 1982. Horace Jenkins's son, Sacha Jenkins, was just 11 at the time of his father's death and has never seen a completed version of the film. A writer and director himself, he is in the early stages of research for a documentary on the making of "Cane River," and joins The Takeaway to discuss his father's legacy today. 


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The Year in Photos, Tension in South Sudan, The Art of Spoken Word

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 22, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Which photographs made the biggest impact this year? The Takeaway talks with some of the photographers behind the most memorable and haunting photos of 2016, including Jeffrey Scales, photo editor at The New York Times, Ben Lowy, who covered the election for TIME, and Stephanie Keith, a photographer for Reuters, Getty, and The New York Times. 
  • After a Christmas market was attacked earlier this week, Germany is now confronting a new reality about security that may conflict with its previous open door policy on migrants and refugees. Constanze Stelzenm?ller, Robert Bosch senior fellow with the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings, explains. 
  • Last week, more than 150 documentary filmmakers and photojournalists signed an open letter to camera giants like Nikon, Canon and Olympus, calling for the manufacturers to build encryption into their products to help protect the individuals behind the lens. Harlo Holmes, director of newsroom digital security at Freedom of the Press Foundation, has the details. 
  • On any given day, there are approximately 415,000 children living in foster care. We take a closer look at the foster care system through the eyes of child welfare advocate Marcia Robinson Lowry, a lawyer and the founder and executive director of the advocacy group A Better Childhood.
  • Two years after South Sudan's civil war, militias in the country have started to mobilize along ethnic lines. Last month, the head U.N. Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan said that "the scale of rape of women and girls is frankly mind boggling," and that the nation is on the cusp of another ethnic conflict. Ken Scott, U.N. commissioner on Human Rights in South Sudan, weighs in. 
  • George Watsky is a rapper and spoken word poet. His art often blurs the lines between music and theater, and he joins The Takeaway today to discuss his creative process. 


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Complicity in Aleppo, A Flood of Opioids, The 14th Librarian of Congress

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Dec 21, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Though the United States has been notably absent from diplomatic talks in recent days, the last of those trapped in the Syrian city of Aleppo are expected to be evacuated today after discussions between Russia, Iran, and Turkey. Ryan Crocker served 37 years in the Foreign Service and is the former ambassador to Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Kuwait, Afghanistan and Lebanon. He explores what's next in the Syrian civil war. 
  • Records obtained by The Charleston Gazette-Mail in West Virginia show that pharmacies were flooded with 780 million pain killers in the state between 2007 and 2012. While deaths from overdoses climbed, drug wholesalers continued to ship massive amounts of pain pills. Eric W. Eyre, a reporter for Charleston Gazette-Mail, explains.
  • Governor Pat McCrory will hold a special legislative session to consider repeal of HB2, the state’s “bathroom bill,” which has drawn fierce criticism and cost the state millions of dollars in business. Erica Lachowitz, a trans advocate for equality based in Charlotte, has the details.
  • This year has been full of important moments that we all shared together collectively. Shaun King, the senior justice writer for The New York Daily News, reflects on how he has covered everything from police shootings to random acts of racism across the country.
  • Carla Hayden, the 14th Librarian of Congress, was sworn in this past September. She is the first woman and the first African American to lead the Library of Congress, and she joins the program to discuss her plan to bring the library into the future.


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Terror in Ankara and Berlin, Charges in Flint, An Immigrant's View from Trump Tower

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Dec 20, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Andrey G. Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, was shot and killed in a gallery in Ankara on Monday. The assassination came a day before defense ministers from Iran, Russia, and Turkey were scheduled to meet in Moscow to discuss the Syrian civil war. Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent for BuzzFeed, explains how this killing may impact relations between Russia and Turkey, and the crisis in Aleppo. 
  • On Monday night, a truck plowed into a Christmas market outside of the Kaiser Wilhelm memorial church in Berlin, killing at least 12 people and injuring dozens of others. A suspected driver was arrested near the scene, but a passenger in the truck died during the crash. Thalia Beaty, a freelance print and radio journalist in Berlin, has the details on the attack. 
  • A review released late last week found that a state agency in Michigan wrongly accused individuals in at least 20,000 cases of fraudulently seeking unemployment payments. Jennifer Lord, an attorney with the law firm Pitt, McGehee, Palmer & Rivers who is representing clients falsely accused of fraud in a class action suit, weighs in on the case.
  • There have been major protests in Warsaw, Poland, recently following the populist right-wing government's announcement that it intends to limit news media access to parliament. Adam Easton, BBC correspondent in Warsaw, says that critics are complaining that the proposed new rules are part of an ongoing effort by the ruling party to consolidate power.
  • On Monday, Christine LaGarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, was found guilty in French court for her misuse of public funds while in office as finance minister. Edwin Truman, a non-resident senior fellow of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, explains what's next. 
  • Kunal Sood is an immigrant on an F1 visa from Uttar Pradesh, India. He has experienced this election through the unique vantage of being an immigrant in America, who happens to also live in Trump Tower. He says the 2016 campaign challenged his ideas of what America really is.

 



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Pleading With Electors, Tillerson Leaks, 30 Years on Death Row

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Dec 19, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The election of Donald Trump has thrust the intricacies of the Electoral College into the spotlight. There has been great upheaval within the Electoral College this year, with some electors pushing to write in a different Republican candidate, and others demanding a briefing on Russian election interference. Lee Snover, a Donald Trump elector, tells Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich why she is feeling a bit disappointed by the president-elect. 
  • As the inauguration of North Carolina's Democratic Governor-elect Roy Cooper approaches, the Republican-led legislature passed bills this Friday to limit the incoming governor's power. Grier Martin, a Democratic member of the North Carolina House of Representatives, representing District 34, explains.
  • The drinking water supply in Corpus Christi, Texas has been contaminated by an asphalt emulsifier, and now officials are instructing residents not to use their tap water or attempt to treat it at home. Matt Woolbright, data reporter for the Corpus Christi Caller Times, has the details on this crisis. 
  • A Brennan Center report compiling three years of research finds that 39 percent of the incarcerated prison population poses little to no threat to public safety. Inimai Chettiar, director of the Brennan Center's Justice Program, has the details. 
  • Anthony Ray Hinton spent 30 years on death row for a crime he did not commit. He joins The Takeaway to discuss his experience and what it reveals about the criminal justice system.


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Refugee Danger, Mall Madness, Holiday Films

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 16, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • To date, 2016 has been the deadliest year to date for migrants crossing the Mediterranean. Ahead of International Migrants Day, The Takeaway speaks to Greek Filmmaker Daphne Matziaraki, who discusses her short film that follows one Coast Guard ship in the Mediterranean.
  • Senator Bob Graham, the former chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, discusses the U.S. relationship with Russia amidst investigations into hacking, and why civic engagement is so important in this moment.
  • Melissa Locker, culture reporter for TIME, The Guardian, and The Takeaway, brings us the season’s best holiday movies to catch. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new films hitting the box office this weekend, including the new "Star Wars" movie, "Collateral Beauty," and "Fences."
  • There is only one large suburban mall currently under construction in the U.S. and it's located in East Rutherford, New Jersey. In a new five-part series called "Mall Madness," WNYC Reporter Ilya Marritz examines the origins of the project, and whether it's finally going to get built.
  • Russian interference in the presidential election has divided Republicans. Chris Deaton, online editor at the Weekly Standard, a conservative magazine, explains.

     



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Devastation in Syria, Cybersecurity, The Evolution of Glam

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 15, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Though civilians are being evacuated, devastation and destruction continues in Aleppo. Basel Marshall was once a college student in Aleppo. Originally from Raqqa, this 24-year-old successfully made it to Germany last year. As he watches his homeland be destroyed from afar, he shares his story with The Takeaway.
  • On Thursday, President-elect Donald Trump was supposed to hold a press conference with his family to address his many business conflicts of interest. Instead, he postponed that announcement, and took to Twitter to inform journalists that no new deals would be made. We look at how Trump’s business ties are already jeopardizing U.S. interests with Matthew T. Sanderson, a lawyer and Republican who has worked on the presidential campaigns of Senators John McCain and Rand Paul, and Governor Rick Perry.
  • The U.S. Department of Education has sent representatives to Edinburg, Texas to evaluate whether the Texas Education Agency deliberately kept a certain percentage of students out of special education services. Bill Zeeble, a reporter for KERA in North Texas, has the details. 
  • The Federal Reserve raised its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday. It's just the second time in a decade that the fed has raised rates. Charlie Herman, business and culture editor for WNYC, discusses the Fed's decision and what this means for the economy under a Trump administration.
  • Yesterday, Yahoo announced that over 1 billion of its user accounts had been compromised in 2013. For more on this hack we turn to Kim Zetter, a journalist and author covering cyber security for publications like WIRED, The Washington Post, and The Intercept, and other publications.


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Humanity in Crisis, Nuclear Energy, Trump and Tech

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Dec 14, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Rick Perry, the former Texas governor and a failed presidential candidate, is President-elect Donald Trump's pick for energy secretary. During the campaign, the Trump team looked at ways to keep nuclear power alive. What would that look like, and what are the risks? Gregory Jaczko, former chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, answers.
  • The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty was adopted by the United Nations Security Council 20 years ago this past September. Lassina Zerbo, executive secretary of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization, explains how the organization detects nuclear tests.

  • Allegations that Russia worked to influence the 2016 presidential election has dominated the news this week. U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, joins The Takeaway to discuss his concerns over Rex Tillerson, President-elect Trump's pick for secretary of state, and the U.S. approach to dealing with Russian President Vladimir Putin.
  • Civilians in the besieged Syrian city of Aleppo are reportedly not being allowed to leave after a Russian-brokered peace deal fell apart last night as fighting resumed. Kareem Shaheen, a Middle East reporter for The Guardian based in Beirut, explains.
  • A pipeline 150 miles from the site of the Standing Rock protests in Belfield, North Dakota has ruptured, spilling 176,000 gallons of oil into the Little Missouri River tributary. Leigh Paterson, a reporter for Inside Energy, has the details. 
  • Amidst a shortage of food and electricity, Venezuelan President Nicol?s Maduro closed the border with Columbia this week to prevent the movement of currency. Hannah Dreier, Venezuela correspondent for The Associated Press, explains. 
  • President-elect Trump will meet in New York with Silicon Valley executives today to discuss the future relationship between the federal government and tech start ups. What can these innovators expect from the next four years? Heather Redman, a tech startup investor, answers. 


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The Fall of Aleppo, American Interference, Science-for-Hire

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Dec 13, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad have retaken the city of Aleppo, and the Islamic State has captured the ancient city of Palmyra. Thousands have been killed in the battle to retake Aleppo, but hundreds of thousands have died in Syria since the civil war began. Stephen O’Brien, the United Nations under-secretary-general for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, examines this crisis and what's next. 
  • Who will be left to deal with Syria in the new Trump Administration? President-elect Donald Trump made it official this morning by naming Exxon Mobil CEO and Chairman Rex Tillerson as his choice for secretary of state. But Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill are concerned about his nomination, according to Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich
  • After criticizing Boeing last week over high costs, Donald Trump took to Twitter on Monday to blast the cost of F-35. Under Trump, will the U.S. curb aircraft spending, and what kind of resistance will he the administration see? Mark Cancian, a senior advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, who previously oversaw Department of Defense acquisitions at the White House Office of Management and Budget, answers. 
  • So-called "science-for-hire" firms fund studies that often end up in scientific journals to specifically influence people in industry and in courtrooms.  Myron Levin is the editor and founder of FairWarning, a nonprofit news organization that focuses on public health, safety, and environmental issues, co-wrote an article about one of the biggest of these science-for-hire firms.

  • Accusations against Wells Fargo have expanded to Prudential. It appears that Prudential life insurance policies were sold fraudulently through Wells Fargo employees. Sheelah Kolhatkar, staff writer at The New Yorker, has the details. 


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Mother Russia, Race and Football, Becoming a Titan

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Dec 12, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The C.I.A. has concluded that Russia intervened in the 2016 election to help Donald Trump win the presidency, according to officials briefed on the matter. On Sunday, a bi-partisan group of senators asked for an investigation into the situation. For details on what's next, we turn to Fred Burton, a former counterterrorism agent with the U.S. State Department and the vice president of intelligence with the geopolitical strategy firm Stratfor.
  • While top officials in Washington and American voters consider Russia’s interference in the election, President-elect Donald Trump is considering Rex Tillerson, the chairman and chief executive of Exxon Mobil, for secretary of state. Tillerson has close ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin, who he has known for over two decades. David Sanger, national security correspondent correspondent for our partner The New York Times, discusses the issues at hand.
  • America's relationship with Turkey is growing increasingly testy, and last week, President Obama waived prohibitions of arms sales to a Turkish enemy, the Syrian Kurds. Mahir Zeynalov, columnist with Al Arabiya and contributor to The Huffington Post, joins The Takeaway to assess the country's international relationships. 

  • President-elect Donald Trump has plans to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, but what does that mean for the future of Medicare, which Republicans want to privatize? Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, weighs in. 
  • This week, the Retro Report documentary team takes a look at the history of patents and how the pharmaceutical research industry has been able to drive up the cost of medicine today. Clyde Haberman, a contributing writer to our partners at The New York Times, has the details. 
  • Over the course of this NFL season, the conversation has increasingly turned to the role of race on the field. Carolina Panther MVP Quarterback Cam Newton has said he is not being protected by NFL officials because he is black. Is this part of a bigger pattern? Bill Rhoden, a writer for ESPN’s “The Undefeated” and author of “Third and a Mile: The Trials and Triumphs of the Black Quarterback,” answers.


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Disability Rights, Easing Conflict in Syria, 'The Underground Railroad Game'

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 09, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In 2015, just 17.5 percent of people with a disability were employed, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retired Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), who authored the Americans with Disabilities Act, discusses how far disability rights have come, and the work that still needs to be done. 
  • How are the events of the week being discussed in conservative circles? Noah Rothman, assistant online editor of Commentary Magazine, a conservative monthly publication, answers. 
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the musical "La La Land," starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, and the raunchy comedy "Office Christmas Party," featuring Jennifer Aniston and Jason Bateman. 
  • A week after a fire at the Oakland artist space known as "Ghost Ship" killed 36 people, Gabe Meline, KQED's online arts editor, reflects on the tragedy of the fire, and what the space means for individuals in the community. 
  • The Syrian army has now retaken 75 percent of eastern Aleppo, which rebels had held for the past four years, and now Russia and the United States are reportedly close to reaching a deal to ease the conflict. Robin Wright, a joint fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and a contributing writer for The New Yorker, explains.


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Mandates to Govern, The EPA Under Trump, Artist Robert Glasper

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 08, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Hillary Clinton is now leading Donald Trump by more than 2.7 million in the popular vote. In a system where half the country doesn't vote, what constitutes a mandate to govern? Newton Minow, an American attorney, vice chair of the Commission on Presidential Debates and former chair of the FCC, weighs in. 
  • On Tuesday, lawmakers in Ohio approved a bill that bans abortion as early as six weeks after conception. If approved, the law would represent one of the most stringent abortion restrictions in the country, though Governor John Kasich has questioned in the past whether such a bill would be constitutional. Jennifer Branch, a civil rights attorney and partner at Gerhardstein and Branch, a law firm representing many of the abortion providers in Ohio, discusses the bill and abortion law in Ohio.  
  • On Wednesday, President-elect Trump tapped Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the EPA. Pruitt is currently waging a legal battle against President Obama’s climate change policies and is a longtime ally of the fossil fuel industry. Jeff Holmstead, former assistant administrator for air and radiation at the EPA, analyzes the impact of Pruitt's selection. 
  • Retired Marine General John Kelly was picked to lead the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday, a key post in Trump’s administration following his campaign promise to crack down on immigration and build a wall. What can we expect out of Gen. Kelly? For answers, we turn to Alan Cohn, who served in several senior policy positions at the Department of Homeland Security from 2006-2015.
  • Actress and singer Leslie Uggams has been in show business since the age of six, when she first appeared on TV. Since then, she's moved seamlessly between film, television, and theater. Uggams is a cultural pioneer, winning a Tony award for her Broadway debut in "Hallelujah, Baby!", and becoming the first African American woman to host her own TV variety show in 1970. She joins The Takeaway to discuss black representation in entertainment. 

  • Grammy winning jazz pianist Robert Glasper put out a new album, "ArtScience," in September with his group, The Robert Glasper Experiment. He reflects on his we work and creative process today on The Takeaway. 


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An Elector's Rebellion, Pentagon Waste, Remembering Pearl Harbor

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Dec 07, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • A report commissioned by Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work to investigate waste within the Pentagon shows that more than $125 billion was wasted over the course of five years. Tina Jonas, senior advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies who served as the comptroller undersecretary of defense for the Department of Defense from 2004 to 2008, weighs in on the report. How are lawmakers on Capitol Hill responding to this report? Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich answers. 
  • Donald Trump’s new Washington hotel will host an event for the Kingdom of Bahrain on Wednesday, something that's raising questions about potential conflicts of interest. Meredith McGehee, a strategic adviser at the Campaign Legal Center, explains. 
  • Ahead of the December 19th vote in the Electoral College, some electors are considering uniting against a different candidate in order to change the course of the presidency. Jerad Sutton, presidential elector for Colorado's 4th congressional district, has the details. 
  • Voters in California legalized recreational marijuana back in November, but it is unclear how things will move forward in the state over the next four years, according to David Downs, cannabis editor for the San Francisco Chronicle.
  • The archival restoration group Indie Collect has been working recently to restore Cane River, a little-seen work by Horace Jenkins, a black director who died months after his film's premiere in 1982. As part of our weeklong series on African-Americans in entertainment, we speak with Jenkins' son, Sacha Jenkins, who is himself a writer and filmmaker.
  • Wednesday marks the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. We look back at the leadership of President Roosevelt during this period with Paul Sparrow, director of the FDR Library and Museum.


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DAPL's Next Steps, Executions in Georgia, Norman Lear

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Dec 06, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • A mistrial was declared yesterday in the police shooting death of Walter Scott, an unarmed African-American man whose shooting and subsequent death was captured on both police car dash camera and cellphone video as he ran from an officer following a traffic stop for a non-working tail light. Philip Stinson, a criminologist, former police officer, and associate professor at Bowling Green State University, has the details on what's next. 
  • As Standing Rock protesters and tribal leaders celebrate a victory over the Dakota Access Pipeline, supporters of the pipeline are looking forward. Craig Stevens, spokesperson for the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now, which supports the pipeline, joins us to discuss what he expects will happen going forward.
  • A settlement has been reached in a class action lawsuit filed by a group of mentally ill prisoners against federal prison officials at ADX-Florence. The Marshall Project's Andrew Cohen and Dr. Terry Kupers, institute professor at the Wright Institute in Oakland, explain.
  • An electronic music party at an Oakland warehouse ended in tragedy last Friday night after a fire spread through a live/work space for artists. Now, the incident is reinvigorating the debate over building safety. Cy Musiker, reporter and host of "To Do List" from KQED, shares his report from Northern California.
  • The state of Georgia is set to execute William Sallie tomorrow. Sallie was convicted for murder in 1990, and missed a federal review of his sentence by eight days, in part the result of his lack of counsel following his sentencing. His execution will be Georgia’s ninth in 2016, the most of any state this year. Rhonda Cook, staff writer for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, weighs in. 
  • American rapper, singer, and writer Dessa Darling first got her start with spoken word poetry while studying philosophy at the University of Minnesota. She’s been described as "Mos Def meets Dorothy Parker," and joins The Takeaway to discuss her new single and creative process.
  • In part two of our series on black representation in entertainment, we speak with longtime television writer and producer Norman Lear about the early genesis of African-American representation in sitcoms. 


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Sioux Celebrations, Trump Worries China, Being Black in Hollywood

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Dec 05, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Sunday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not approve an easement that would allow the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota. Filmmaker Josh Fox just returned from his second trip to Standing Rock. He's director of the film "GASLAND," and brings us the latest today. 
  • For 37 years, no American president has been cleared to speak directly to a leader of Taiwan. Despite being a central policy to the U.S.-China relationship, President-elect Donald Trump broke that rule over the weekend. Bonnie Glaser, senior adviser for Asia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, has the details. 
  • The Supreme Court is hearing oral arguments for two cases on redistricting today. They both concern whether certain districts were purposefully drawn to pack African-American voters into majority-minority districts, lessening their overall representation in the state legislature or Congress. Richard Briffault, a professor at Columbia Law School who focuses on government and legislation, has the details. 

  • Norbert Hofert, a key figure in Austria's far-right Freedom Party, lost his bid for president against left-leaning candidate Alexander Van der Bellen. Alison Langley, a freelance journalist based in Zurich, Switzerland, and a lecturer at Webster University in Vienna, joins The Takeaway to discuss the election results.
  • In Oakland, a deadly fire has killed at least 33 people. The fire, which engulfed an artist live/work space, started Friday night during a party. John Sepulvado a reporter at KQED and host of the morning program "California Report," has the details on what happened. 

  • The 1992 film "Daughters of the Dust" was the first film directed by an African-American woman to receive a theatrical release,  and it was re-released this year. Director Julie Dash talks with us about the film, and about minority representation in entertainment.


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'Mad Dog' Defense, Alt Christmas Music, Cuban Poetry and Politics

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Dec 02, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Up to 2,000 veterans are planning to gather next week at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline protests to act as “human shields.” Their timing is crucial: Monday is the deadline for mandatory evacuation of the site, and anyone who remains could be prosecuted for trespassing. Today we hear from Michael Wood Jr., a former Marine Corps sergeant and retired Baltimore City Police sergeant. He's one of the veterans planning to turn out at Standing Rock.
  • At a "thank you" rally last night in Cincinnati, President-elect Donald Trump announced that he has selected Retired Marine Corps General James Mattis, known as "Mad Dog," as his choice to be the next secretary of defense if he is confirmed by the Senate. Mattis retired in 2013 and would need a waiver from Congress to serve based on a requirement that a defense secretary be a civilian for at least seven years. David Rothkopf, CEO and editor of Foreign Policy, has the details on this announcement. 

  • Many Republicans who supported Trump are putting their trust in his ability to resurrect jobs in the coal industry. Can he deliver? Sheryl Gay Stolberg, mid-Atlantic bureau chief for our partners at The New York Times, weighs in. Ruby Couch, a coal miner for 35 years in Kentucky, is hopeful that Donald Trump will be able to save the coal industry.
  • Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews this week’s big new releases, including "Jackie," "La La Land," and "Silence." Culture reporter Melissa Locker brings us alternative holiday songs to get you through the next few weeks.
  • Cuban-American poet and author Richard Blanco was the first Latino, the first immigrant, and the first openly gay inaugural poet, having read his poem "One Today" at President Obama's second inauguration in 2013. Today, he reflects on the death of Fidel Castro and the future of the relationship between the United States and Cuba.



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Aleppo in Rubble, Arctic Ice, Political Cartoons

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Dec 01, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On Wednesday, the U.N. Security Council held an emergency meeting to address the humanitarian crisis in Aleppo. Frederic Hof, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East and a former special advisor for transition in Syria at the U.S. Department of State, has the details. 
  • South Korean President Park Geun-hye has asked parliament to decide how she can step down following a corruption scandal that has created a political crisis. Her father, Chung Hee, became president of South Korea after a military coup in 1961. Carter Eckert, author of "Park Chung Hee and Modern Korea: The Roots of Militarism, 1866-1945," look at the likelihood of her impeachment, and puts her leadership into the context of her father’s historic and despotic rule.
  • December 1st is World Aids Day. We look back at the progress made in the prevention and treatment of HIV with Suzan Meredith, who was diagnosed with HIV along with her two young children in 1997. She's an ambassador for the Elisabeth Glaser Pediatric Aids Foundation and an author. Also weighing in is Dr. Donna Futterman, professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and director for the Adolescent AIDS Program at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, New York.
  • On Monday night, wildfires in Great Smoky Mountain National Park roared into the resort town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, leaving at least seven dead, injuring dozens, and destroying more than 250 buildings. Larry Waters, the mayor of Sevier County, Tennessee, which includes Gatlinburg, discusses the crisis at hand. 
  • Despite heavy snowfall, extremely windy conditions and evacuation orders from state and federal officials, thousands of people continue their resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline. But Doualy Xaykaothao, a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio, tells us that a sense of unity prevails at the camps.

  • Higher global temperatures means that more sea ice is melting, which endangers not only the ecosystems in the Arctic but threatens sea level rise across the globe. Julienne Stroeve, senior research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center and a professor of polar observation at University College London, keeps careful watch on the Arctic and its sea ice.

  • Alison Bechdel's self-syndicated comic strip "Dykes to Watch Out For" ran for 25 years. It follows a group of socially conscious queer women, and served as a sharp critique of our country's aggressive foreign policy and failure to respond to the threat of global warming. In this politically environment, Bechdel has resurrected it. She joins The Takeaway today. 


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The Global Far-Right, Conflict Origins at Standing Rock, Pardon Appeals

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Nov 30, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Snowfall has made its way to North Dakota, adding pressure to the ongoing battle over the Dakota Access Pipeline. As the December 5th deadline to evacuate the encampments approaches, we look back at the origins of this fight with Karen Van Fossan, minister of Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Bismarck, North Dakota. 
  • On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Jennings v. Rodriguez, and consider whether immigrants must be guaranteed a bond hearing and possible release from custody. Cheryl David, an immigration lawyer, joins The Takeaway to discuss how this case could impact millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S.
  • Steven Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs banker, is Donald Trump's pick as secretary of the Treasury. Mnuchin served as finance chair of Trump's presidential campaign. Binyamin Applbaum, Washington correspondent for our partners at The New York Times, has the details on Mnuchin's selection. 

  • Several far-right Israeli conservatives were inspired by Donald Trump’s victory and are hopeful that he’ll deliver on his campaign promises to change decades of U.S. foreign policy towards Israel. For a look ahead, we turn to Daniel Levy, president of the U.S./Middle East Project. He also served as a peace negotiator under Israeli Prime Ministers Ehud Barak and Yitzhak Rabin.
  • As President Barack Obama's final term wraps up, activists who support whistleblowers like Edward Snowden and Chelsea Manning have been pushing to convince for the White House to pardon them before President-elect Donald Trump and his administration come into power. Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch, weighs in. 


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Infrastructure Investments, Chess Champions, Denouncing Fidel Castro

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 29, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Infrastructure was one of the main promises Donald Trump made on the campaign trail, but will the president-elect be able to get support from Republicans and Democrats in the first 100 days? Ronald A. Klain, an assistant to President Obama who oversaw the team implementing the American Recovery and Renewal Act from 2009-2011, an adviser to 2016 Hillary Clinton campaign, weighs in. 
  • On Monday, the Michigan Board of Canvassers certified Donald Trump's victory, thereby paving the way for Jill Stein, the Green Party's 2016 presidential candidate, to request a recount in the state. Stein has already officially requested recounts in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, and the Clinton campaign is backing her efforts. Brandon Dillon, chair of the Michigan Democratic Party, explains what's next.  
  • On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Moore V. Texas, a case that centers on the death penalty and people with intellectual disabilities. For details on this case we turn to Jordan Steiker, the Judge Robert M. Parker endowed chair at the University of Texas School of Law and the director of the school’s Capital Punishment Center.
  • President-elect Donald Trump has picked Congressman Tom Price, a Republican from Georgia, to head the Department of Health and Human Services. If confirmed by the Senate, Price will have an annual budget of $1 trillion and would be in a position to help dismantle one of President Obama's signature achievements: The Affordable Care Act. Mary Agnes Carey, a senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, explains what HHS may look like under Rep. Tom Price. 
  • The 2016 World Chess Championship is going into its final game on Wednesday between number one defending champion, Magnus Carlsen of Norway, and Sergey Karjakin of Russia. The two players, both in their mid-twenties, are the youngest to meet for the world championship, and could be a sign of a new age of chess. Chess grandmaster and author Maurice Ashley explains. 
  • Jury selection has resumed in the federal case of Dylann Roof, who is standing trial for the fatal shooting of nine black parishioners at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in Charleston, South Carolina last year. Jennifer Berry Hawes, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the Post and Courier in Charleston, is currently working on a book about the Emanuel AME Church massacre and joins The Takeaway for an update on the trial. 
  • How are Cubans processing the death of Fidel Castro, and how does his passing resonate in their country? Carlos Eire, professor at Yale University and author of "Waiting for Snow in Havana," which won the national book award in 2003, weighs in. 


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Election Recounts, A New Era for Cuba, Celebrating Maya Angelou

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Nov 28, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Hillary Clinton's campaign has agreed to participate in a vote recount effort led by Green Party candidate Jill Stein. But last night, President-elect Donald Trump tweeted, without evidence, that there was "serious voter fraud in Virginia, New Hampshire and California." Poorvi Vora, a professor of computer science at George Washington University, says the recount isn't as much about changing the outcome as it is about assuring voter integrity and confidence.
  • The conflicts of interests facing President-elect Donald Trump continue to grow. Eric Lipton, a Washington-based investigative reporter with our partners at The New York Times, has the details. 
  • This weekend, former Cuban leader Fidel Castro died at the age of 90. His younger brother, Raul Castro, is set to resign the presidency in 2018. Julia Sweig, a CBS News Cuba analyst and author of the book "Cuba: What Everyone Else Needs to Know," explores the future of Cuba. 
  • This week, our partners with the Retro Report documentary team explain how the fight save the Amazon Rainforest turned into a global mission. Geoffrey O'Connor, show-runner for Insurgent Media and a producer for CNN and Retro Report, weighs in. 
  • Andrea Bonilla is a college freshman who grew up undocumented. She’s now able to work legally and live openly thanks to a program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. But the initiative, which was created by President Obama, could come to an end under Donald Trump. She weighs in today on The Takeaway. 


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Got Trust? Exploring Faith and Suspicion in the 21st Century

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Nov 25, 2016


Many Americans have lost trust in U.S. institutions, politicians, and the media. Today, The Takeaway explores what it means to trust after the 2016 election. Here's what you'll find in this special podcast:

  • Looking for universal truths in a 'post-truth' world. Rebecca Carroll, producer of special projects on race at WNYC explains how trust can be shaken up when one group interprets an event differently from another. 
  • As the public watches the crisis in Flint, Michigan unfold, many Americans have begun to lose trust in their water sources, and the governmental agencies that claim it's safe. Environmental activist Erin Brockovich explores the fight for clean water.
  • A 2016 Gallup poll found that 73 percent of Americans trust the military. But retired Army Colonel Andrew Bacevich is worried about our nation's inability to decide on a core set of values.
  • Pulitzer Prize-winning author Liaquat Ahamed, the former head of the World Bank’s investment division, is no stranger to the intricacies of global financial markets. He examines American distrust of financial institutions, and Wall Street in particular, which he argues is a recurrent theme in this country, dating from the time of George Washington. 
  • Former New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan reflects on the public's distrust of the American media, and how consumers choose news sources that echo their own political views.
  • Radio personality and relationship guru Delilah takes a break from counseling her millions of devoted listeners to talk trust in love and relationships with The Takeaway.


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FDR's Four Freedoms in a Divided America

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Nov 24, 2016


This Thanksgiving, a mere two weeks after the 2016 election, America has never been more divided. As we gather around to give thanks with family and friends, The Takeaway is taking a look back into history.

Before the start of World War II, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt laid out his vision for what that world should look like in his famous "Four Freedoms" speech, which he delivered in January 1941. 

“In the future days that we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded on four essential human freedoms," Roosevelt proclaimed. Those freedoms were: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.

On Thanksgiving Day, The Takeaway examines the state of those four freedoms in 2016. Here's what you'll find in this special episode:

  • After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Japanese-Americans were rounded up and held in internment camps. Setsuko Winchester, a Japanese-American ceramicist and former NPR journalist, has been visiting sights of Japanese internment for an ongoing project titled: "Freedom From Fear." She discusses her work and freedom from fear today on The Takeaway.

  • How has freedom of speech evolved since 1941? Steven Thrasher, writer-at-large and senior columnist for The Guardian U.S., and a doctoral fellow in American studies at New York University, discusses free speech in context of our changing technological landscape, through the lens of the 2016 election, and through the arch of global events. 
  • In America today almost 47 million people live in poverty — about 14.9 percent of the country. President Roosevelt tackled the problem head-on by introducing Social Security and Medicare. Father Timothy Graff, director of the Office of Human Concerns for the Archdiocese of Newark, New Jersey, explains how he understands the "freedom from want," and how it has changed since the 1940s.
  • Roosevelt could not have possibly known of the the modern problems associated with freedom when he slowly and deliberately dictated his now famous speech. And yet, his bold vision for "the freedom of every person to worship God in his own way" is a message that resonates deeply with Chaplain Lieutenant Colonel Dawud Agbere, a Ghanaian immigrant and Muslim Chaplain in the  U.S. Army. He looks at the American ideal of freedom of religion, and freedom from religion, today on The Takeaway. 



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New Precedent for the Press, Properties Around the World, Violence at Standing Rock

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Nov 23, 2016


  • Over the past few days, President-elect Trump has defied all norms of the presidential relationship with the media including criticizing a group of television anchors at a meeting earlier this week and then canceling and rescheduling a meeting with The New York Times. Former Executive editor of the New York Times Bill Keller talks about the precedent he is setting for this administration’s relationship with the media. 

  • After promising during the campaign that he would separate himself from the Trump Organization, Donald Trump tweeted on Monday that “it was well known that I have interests in properties all over the world.” Kenneth A. Gross, a partner at an international law firm who advises corporations and elected officials on ethics laws, examines the complexity of business ethics in the White House.

  • New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, who is being tapped as a future leader of the party, talks about the future of the Democratic Party after the stunning defeat of Hillary Clinton

  • South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley has been nominated for Ambassador to the United Nations. Nancy Soderberg, who held the same job under Bill Clinton, explains the position and this new development.

  • As part of our ongoing partnership with News Deeply, we hear from Fatima Askira, executive director of the Borno Women Development Initiative, who is working to rehabilitate women held by Boko Haram in Nigeria and helping them reintegrate into civilian society.

  • It has been a trying week for protesters at the Dakota Access pipeline, with conflicting reports of violence and police firing on protesters with water cannons in freezing weather. Tara Houska, a Brown professor and national campaigns director for Honor the Earth, shares her experience on the ground.

  • Almost 10 million children between the ages of 10 and 17 in this country are food insecure, meaning they don't have reliable access to enough nutritious food. Three teenagers from Portland, Oregon talk about their involvement in Home Forward, a service organization in the state.

     



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A City Without Hospitals, Divided States, Black Lives Move Forward

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 22, 2016


  • The last functioning hospitals in the rebel-held side of Aleppo have been destroyed by government strikes. What is the future of those who remain trapped in the besieged city?  Dr. Rola Hallam is a British-Syrian doctor and CEO and Founder of Can-Do, a new start up providing medical and humanitarian aid to the people of Syria. 
  • The North Carolina governorship still hasn't been called, with Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper’s lead growing to about 6,600 votes over incumbent Republican Governor Pat McCrory. If the margin remains below 10,000 votes, McCrory can call for a recount. Jeff Tiberii, Capitol Bureau Chief for North Carolina Public Radio, reports.
  • Adding to their gains in 2014, Republicans picked up five state House chambers and two state Senate chambers in the election.  David Daley, former editor in chief of Salon, explores how Republicans have been so successful at the state level and what the long term future for Democrats in the states is.
  • After a referendum in Colombia voted down a peace deal, today top leaders of the FARC in Bogota are expected to sign a new peace agreement with the government. Colombia's president Juan Manuel Santos won the Nobel Peace Prize last month for his efforts to end the war. The agreement will have to be signed, and then will likely go to Congress to debate and ratify the agreement.
  • As South Koreans call for the impeachment of President Park, gender has surfaced as a crucial factor in her presidency. Women’s groups protested her candidacy when she was elected as the country’s first female president in 2013, saying that a daughter of a dictator could not represent real women, and they now fear that the scandal will make sexism worse in a country with deeply entrenched gender inequality.  Contributing editor for The New Republic Suki Kim weighs in.
  • On the Native American reservations of northern Minnesota, cycles drug abuse and gang violence can be hard to break out of. Native American filmmaker and Executive Producer Chris Eyre teams up with Director Jack Riccobono to share the story of a gang leader and his protege in the new documentary, "The Seventh Fire."
  • The Black Lives Matter movement was born under an Obama presidency, but its supporters argue that it's more important now than ever before.  Opal Tometi, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, discusses what the next four years of the Black Lives Matter movement will look like in America.


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The Future of Healthcare, Trump's Business Interests, The NSA reacts to Russia

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Nov 21, 2016


  • Hate crimes against Muslims spiked last year to their highest level in more than a decade, while recent cabinet appointment Steve Bannon has said on tape that he doesn't want his kids to going to school with Jews. Rabbi David Fox Sandmel, the Anti-Defamation League’s director of interreligious engagement and Mehnaz Afridi, Director of the Religious Studies, Holocaust, Genocide & Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College, discuss the effect of Trump's rhetoric on Jews and Muslims.

  • President-elect Trump, who vowed to repeal Obamacare, has since said he would leave some elements intact. More than 100,000 people signed up for Obamacare the day after the election and enrollment will remain open until the end of January. Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Secretary of the Department of Health & Human Services, says that the loss of the Affordable Care Act would not only have a significant impact on the healthcare of Americans who rely on it but on the institution that helps enhance and protect the health and well-being of all Americans.  

  • While President-Elect Donald Trump was rage-tweeting S.N.L and the cast of the musical, Hamilton—effectively overshadowing the news that Trump had agreed to pay $25 million to settle lawsuits against his allegedly fraudulent Trump University—he was also busy meeting with Indian business partners, another example in a recent series of events suggesting that the incoming president has yet to separate his business interests from governing.
  • When Donald Trump was elected president, social media sites associated with ISIS and al-Qaeda celebrated Trump's victory. "Rejoice with support from Allah, and find glad tidings in the imminent demise of America at the hands of Trump,” wrote one ISIS related outlet. Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The New York Times who reports on al-Qaeda and ISIS, explains the terror groups' reaction to the election.

  • General Michael Hayden, former Director of the NSA between 1999 and 2005, and the CIA between 2006-2009, discusses how the intelligence community is responding to Russian meddling and preparing for a Trump presidency. Last week, Hayden said that the intelligence community needs to "man up" when dealing with Trump. 
  • A new film from executive producer Leonardo DiCaprio called "The Ivory Game" depicts the underbelly of ivory trafficking. The film goes undercover in Africa and China to find intelligence operatives, undercover activists, and front line rangers. Directors Kief Davidson and Richard Ladkani discuss the purpose of making their film: to serve as a riveting wake up call for the deep corruption at the center of the global ivory trafficking dilemma.



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Your Complete Guide to The Electoral College

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Nov 18, 2016


For the second time in 16 years, a candidate who lost the popular vote but won the Electoral College will go on to be the next president of the United States.

For many Americans, the entire Electoral College system remains frustrating and confusing. But today, we're here to help. Here's what you'll find in this special podcast on the Electoral College:

  • Vikram Amar, dean of the University of Illinois College of Law, explains what the Electoral College system is designed to do and what the framers intended. 
  • Dr. Gary Gregg, the chair in leadership at the University of Louisville and director of the McConnell Center, says the Electoral College is here to stay, and that's a good thing. "I think the Electoral College has sunk its tentacles deep into the American system in ways we don't give it credit for and we don't think about," he says. 
  • How do YOU feel about the U.S. Electoral College? Should we get rid of it, or keep it? If we chose presidents based on just the popular vote, would that change how you vote? Takeaway listeners from around the United States share their thoughts today. 
  • There is a way to get around the Electoral College system as we traditionally understand it without needing a Constitutional amendment. It's something called the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. New York State Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz has the details. 

  • The process of redistricting affects nearly every aspect of how we pick our elected officials, from local representatives to the president. We examine how the process actually works, and how changing maps will affect America's political future with Rebecca Tippett, Director of Carolina Demography at the Carolina Population Center at UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Washington State Senator Mike Padden is one of the only living "faithless electors" in the U.S. There have been 157 in American history — these individuals vote against the Electoral College and with the popular vote or their conscience. Here, he discusses what being an elector actually means, and what he thinks about calls for more faithless electors.


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Native American Unity, Non-Voter Views, Power, Politics and Fiction

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Nov 17, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • As inauguration day approaches, The Takeaway is examining the health of American institutions that are designed to protect our values and rights. Today, we turn our attention to Environmental Protection Agency. William Reilly, former EPA administrator under President George H.W. Bush, explores the future of climate policy under a Trump Administration. 
  • At the start of his European trip this week, President Obama expressed confidence that President-elect Donald Trump would continue our commitment to the NATO alliance. Are allies reassured, or are they readjusting under this new world order? Kurt Volker, former U.S. permanent representative to NATO, weighs in. 
  • On Wednesday, Houthi rebels in Yemen said they were ready to join a national unity government, confirming a plan set by Secretary of State John Kerry for a ceasefire to begin on Thursday. What will the future of the conflict be under a new administration, and what are the chances that peace will hold? Iona Craig, a reporter who recently wrote on Yemen for the New Statesman, answers. 
  • It’s been more than a week since the U.S. presidential election, which largely determined not by those who voted, but by those who didn’t. We talk to Tre Narcisse, who did not vote in the election and did not care who won, about his decision to sit out the election. 
  • The fight over the Dakota Access Pipeline has united representatives from more than 200 Native American groups across the United States. What does this new found unity mean for under a new administration? Jace Weaver, director of the Institute of Native American Studies, explains. 


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Stress Testing U.S. Institutions, Demonstrator Demands, The Memory Illusion

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 15, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • As inauguration day approaches, The Takeaway is examining the health of American institutions that are designed to protect our values and rights. Donald B. Verrilli Jr., former solicitor general of the United States, examines the Supreme Court. 
  • Since Donald Trump was elected seven days ago, more than 200 hate crimes have been reported to the Southern Poverty Law Center. In the days since his election, Trump has appointed a white nationalist figure, Stephen Bannon, Breitbart News executive chairman, to be his chief strategist. How do Republicans feel about this appointment? Ryan Williams, a Republican strategist and former spokesman for Mitt Romney's 2012 presidential campaign, weighs in. 
  • On Monday, The Takeaway heard from Asra Nomani, a Muslim-American, who explained why she voted for President-elect Donald Trump. Today we hear a different perspective from Suzanne Barakat, whose family members were murdered in a 2015 hate crime in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
  • As post-election demonstrations continue across the country, The Takeaway hears from Natalia Aristizabal, the lead organizer of Make the Road New York, to find out what the protesters are hoping to achieve with these demonstrations.
  • Over the weekend, more than a million South Koreans took to the streets of central Seoul and marched toward the Blue House where President Park Geun-hye lives. They're demanding her resignation amidst a growing scandal. Anna Fifield, Tokyo bureau chief for The Washington Post, has the details. 
  • This week, our friends at The Marshall Project explore a decades-old case that is still working its way through Missouri's courts. Andrew Cohen, commentary editor at The Marshall Project, and Kay Lincoln, daughter of Rodney Lincoln, who was charged with the killing of JoAnn Tate before her young children, weigh in. 


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White Nationalism in The White House, Muslims for Trump, The Paris Attacks One Year Later

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Nov 14, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • On the campaign trail, President-elect Donald Trump promised to cut off federal funding for so-called “sanctuary cities," a name given to 300 cities and local jurisdictions that have ignored policies that ask local law enforcement to target undocumented immigrants. Betsy Hodges, the mayor of Minneapolis, a place that's been called a "sanctuary city," looks at the proposed immigration policies of the president-elect. 
  • President-elect Donald Trump has named two of his first hires: GOP Chairman Reince Priebus will be chief of staff, and Stephen Bannon, a white nationalist figure, will have a West Wing office as chief strategist and senior counselor to the president. Meanwhile, The Democratic National Committee is reeling from Donald Trump's victory, and talking about who will lead the DNC.  Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains.
  • Since the Second World War, the U.S. has been both a keeper and defender of international order. But Jeet Heer, a senior editor at The New Republic, argues that the United States can no longer hold that position under a Trump administration. 
  • Our partners at the Retro Report documentary team explore how the 1985 "Live Aid" global concerts used to raise funds for the Ethiopian famine led to other successful social activism campaigns. Bonnie Bertram, a producer with Retro Report, weighs in. 
  • Yesterday was the one year anniversary of the Paris attacks. How do the French feel about their personal safety now, and the safety of their country as a new American leader takes office? For answers, we turn to Samuel Laurent, author of "Al-Qaeda in France."
  • Who are the silent Donald Trump supporters who turned out in droves to support their candidate on Tuesday? One of them is Asra Nomani, a Muslim woman, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, and a co-founder of the Muslim Reform Movement. She explains why she supports the president-elect. 


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Shaky Ground: Exploring the Global Turbulence of 2016

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Sat, Nov 12, 2016


Coming up in today's podcast:

  • The world is going through a turbulent period. Are we're currently experiencing an unstoppable shift in power from the West back to the East? Peter Frankopan, historian at Oxford University and author of "The Silk Roads: A New History of the World," weighs in.
  • Selina Leem is just 19-years-old and is watching her home quietly disappear. She lives in The Marshall Islands, a place that will soon be lost to climate change. She joins The Takeaway to explain how she is saying goodbye. 
  • Peter Pomerantsev, senior fellow at the Legatum Institute in London and the author of "Nothing is True and Everything is Possible," argues that we are now living in a “post-fact” environment, where people create their own narratives, no matter what the reality of any given situation might be.
  • How are all of these factors affecting American democracy, and what does the 2016 election say about where we are in terms of longterm sustainable governance? Jenny Mansbridge, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of "Beyond Adversary Democracy," weighs in. 

 



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Veterans Under Trump, #NotMyPresident, Wilmington's Whitelash

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Nov 11, 2016


  • Asha Castleberry and Daniel Cortez are two veterans from very different backgrounds with very different military pasts. On Veteran's Day, they discuss Trump, ISIS, and the veteran experience.

  • Admiral Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, spoke yesterday about the military under new leadership. That conversation continues today, as Mullen talks about unemployment, post traumatic stress, and a broken Department of Veterans Affairs that is slow on providing care to those who need it.
  • Yesterday's segment with the Alt-Right blogger Paul Ramsey drew a lot of feedback. Some were glad to hear that perspective, others not so much. Listeners call in to comment.
  • #NotMyPresident is trending on social media as thousands across the country marched through the streets in several cities to disavow President-elect Donald Trump. Listeners share their thoughts about the #NotMyPresident movement today on The Takeaway. 
  • Deep in the post-Civil War South, Wilmington, North Carolina was considered to be a "black mecca." But the African American community found themselves the targets of the only successful coup d'etat in American history: The Wilmington Race Riots of November 1898. Christopher Everett discusses his new documentary out this week, "Wilmington on Fire."
  • Peter Yarrow, folk singer and songwriter and founding member of Peter, Paul, and Mary, his daughter Bethany Yarrow, and her boyfriend renowned cellist Rufus Cappadocia recently recorded a song called "Lift Us Up," which they perform performed in-studio. It's as much as call to action as it is a call to better understand each other, an appeal towards basic empathy.


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Victory for the Alt-Right, Uncertainty for the Parties, America Unwinds

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Nov 10, 2016


  • New Yorker Staff Writer George Packer has been documenting what he calls "the unwinding of America and the formation of a new America" for years. The Takeaway asks him if the country is fully unwound, or if there is more to come. 
  • Michigan, which had an 80 percent chance of electing Hillary Clinton, represents one of the most stunning losses for the Democrats. Congresswoman Debbie Dingell joins The Takeaway to talk about what exactly went wrong in the near certain state, and what the disruption of the blue firewall means for the future of the Democratic Party.
  • While the G.O.P. swept the House and Senate, deep fissures remain. Republican strategist Kim Alfano explains what President-elect Donald Trump's victory means for the G.O.P., and how the party and conservatism will proceed alongside the populist support that got him elected.
  • President-elect Trump  has promised to strengthen the military, but his critics fear what he'll do with the nuclear codes. Admiral Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, illuminates the future of the military under President Trump.
  • How do parents tell their children about President Trump?  New York mom Aisha Khan Badi joins The Takeaway in studio to talk about how she is responding to the Trump victory as a Muslim parent to two girls.
  • Alt-right blogger Paul Ramsay embraces a Trump victory, and explains its significance for the future of a fringe movement that now finds itself center stage.


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Donald J. Trump Elected President of the United States in Shocking Victory

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Nov 09, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Donald J. Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States on Tuesday night in a shocking turn of events that defied the polls. Keli Goff, host of WNYC’s Political Party and a columnist at The Daily Beast, joins us all hour for election analysis, and Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich brings us the latest from Pennsylvania. 
  • Overnight, Republicans were able to maintain control of both the House and the Senate. Theo Meyer, a reporter for POLITICO, has the latest on Congress.
  • Voters in 35 states decided on 163 different ballot measures on Tuesday night. Zack Stanton, digital editor for POLITICO Magazine, gives us the results. 
  • Financial markets hate surprises, and Donald Trump's win has sent banks, treasury ministers, and big corporate executives scrambling. Robin Wigglesworth, markets editor for The Financial Times, has the details. 
  • Many women across America are disappointed with the results of Tuesday's election. Feminist icon Gloria Steinem, founder of the National Women's Political Caucus and creator of Ms. magazine, looks at what's next for the women's movement. 


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Voters Have Their Say, An Election Playlist, The Supreme Court

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 08, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • For the last several months, Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has been following the U.S. presidential race from Pennsylvania. On Election Day, he joins us live from a polling place in the eastern part of the state to explain how voters are feeling.
  • The future is here. Today, a coalition of news organizations is bringing the world real-time election analysis based on web analytics and other data in a project known as ElectionlandJohn Keefe, WNYC's senior editor for Data News, has the details.
  • On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a case that questions the scope of the Fair Housing Act (FHA). The case is brought by the city of Miami, which alleges that financial institutions like Wells Fargo and Bank of America have violated the FHA through predatory lending to minorities. Amy Howe, a reporter for SCOTUS Blog, weighs in.

  • The citizens of Dixville Notch, New Hampshire are often labeled "first-in-the-nation" to vote. Why? This charming township, which is made up of just eight residents, begins voting at midnight. Tom Tillotson, Dixville Notch Town Moderator, gives us some of the first election results in the nation.
  • Since 1984, Guam's straw poll has always predicted the results of the U.S. presidential election. Tom Maxedon, news director for Public Radio Guam, brings us the latest. 
  • In the days leading up to the election, Donald Trump has been kicked off Twitter by his staff to prevent any further mishaps. Twitter has been crucial to this election, but the fate of the company may now be in jeopardy. Nathan Schneider, a journalist and professor at the University of Colorado, gives us his analysis. 
  • John Schaefer, host of WNYC's Soundcheck and New Sounds, gives us an Election Day playlist for your visit to the polls.


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Election 2016: The Final Stretch

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Nov 07, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • With less than 24 hours to go before Election Day, Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich gives us an update on the race for the White House. 
  • How are citizens around the world viewing the U.S presidential election? Today we hear from Charles Maynes, an independent radio producer and reporter based in Moscow, and Tom Mitchell, Beijing bureau chief for The Financial Times.
  • For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today, we hear from Russell Ballenger, an activist from the Minneapolis-St. Paul area.
  • With help from a couple researches from the University of Nebraska, a team at WNYC Radio has come up with a way to measure stress during the election by analyzing saliva. Amanda Aronczyk, a reporter for WNYC and the Only Human podcast, and Elaine Chen, a producer for WNYC's Only Human podcast, explain.
  • A day before the election, we do a final check in on the polls with Sam Wang, a neuroscientist at Princeton University and a data analyst and founder of the Princeton Election Consortium.
  • How are young people thinking about the 2016 election? We hear from four high school students at Excelsior Academy in Newburgh, New York. 


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Shaky Ground: Exploring the Global Turbulence of 2016

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Nov 04, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • The world is going through a turbulent period. Are we're currently experiencing an unstoppable shift in power from the West back to the East? Peter Frankopan, historian at Oxford University and author of "The Silk Roads: A New History of the World," weighs in.
  • Selina Leem is just 19-years-old and is watching her home quietly disappear. She lives in The Marshall Islands, a place that will soon be lost to climate change. She joins The Takeaway to explain how she is saying goodbye. 
  • Peter Pomerantsev, senior fellow at the Legatum Institute in London and the author of "Nothing is True and Everything is Possible," argues that we are now living in a “post-fact” environment, where people create their own narratives, no matter what the reality of any given situation might be.
  • How are all of these factors affecting American democracy, and what does the 2016 election say about where we are in terms of longterm sustainable governance? Jenny Mansbridge, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of "Beyond Adversary Democracy," weighs in. 

 



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Voter Intimidation, Election Views from The Mid East, Touring Clinton Headquarters

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Thu, Nov 03, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Donald Trump has been calling on his supporters to monitor the polls for months, but it appears some instances of voter intimidation have already taken place across the country. Leah Wright Rigueur, an assistant professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, explains. 
  • The Takeaway toured Hillary Clinton's campaign headquarters in Brooklyn this week, and we heard from Amanda Finney, a digital correspondence assistant for the campaign, and Maya Harris, senior domestic policy adviser; Elan Kriegel, director of analytics; Osi Imeokparia, chief product officer; and Addisu Demissie, national voter outreach and mobilization director.
  • All this week we’ll be checking in on how citizens around the world are viewing the U.S presidential election. Today we hear from Borzou Daragahi, Middle East correspondent, BuzzFeed News, in Turkey.

  • For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today, we hear from Pastor Rit Varriale from the Evangelical Hub community type of Shelby, North Carolina. 
  • In Missouri, the U.S. Senate race is heating up between Democratic challenger Jason Kander and Republican Roy Blunt. They're polling just a point apart despite Donald Trump’s sizable lead in the state. Jo Mannies, political reporter for St. Louis Public Radio, explains.
  • On Sunday, Will Reeve, the son of beloved actor Christopher Reeve, will run the New York City marathon in his father's honor. He's hoping to raise money for his family’s charity, which provides support for those with spinal cord injuries and funds for medical research. Will Reeve, now a contributor to ESPN, joins The Takeaway today. 


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Turkish Crackdown, Native Equality, Exploring Race & Violence With Art

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Wed, Nov 02, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • In Turkey, the fallout from a failed coup attempt in July continues. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdo?an closed 15 media outlets and detained several journalists this week as part of an ongoing crackdown that has resulted in the arrests of an estimated 37,000 individuals. Elliot Ackerman, a journalist and writer based in Istanbul and the author of the novel "Green on Blue," discusses the crisis at hand. 
  • The drama of the U.S presidential election may be boosting revenues for betting companies in the U.K., but it is not just the gamblers who are interested in the outcome. Guto Harri, a political analyst based in London and former spokesman for Boris Johnson, explains how Britons are viewing the U.S. presidential election. 
  • In Ohio, Democrat Ted Strickland is up against Republican incumbent Rob Portman in a race for the U.S. Senate. With just days before the election, it appears Portman has a solid lead against Strickland. Karen Kasler, statehouse bureau chief for Ohio Public Radio, has the latest. 
  • Californians have a whopping 17 measures to vote on this Election Day. They range from a $2.00 per pack tax on cigarettes, to legalizing recreational marijuana. Marisa Lagos, KQED's government and politics reporter, has the details on these ballot initiatives. 
  • Protests continue at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline, and members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and their supporters say police are growing increasingly violent against their peaceful demonstrations. How do those opposing the protesters feel about what's happening? Craig Stevens of the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure, and Ruth Hopkins, the Dakota/Lakota Sioux writer for Indian Country Today, weigh in.
  • In a new exhibit titled “Until” at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, visual artist Nick Cave uses found objects to represent a landscape of American race and identity. According to the artist, these items need to be examined and re-imagined rather than pushed aside.


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FBI Worries, Trade Concerns, 40 Years of Punk

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Tue, Nov 01, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Many former senior Justice Department officials believe that FBI Director James Comey made a major mistake when he decided to inform Congress of the Clinton email review. Donald Ayer, former U.S. deputy attorney general and currently a partner at the law firm Jones Day, explains.
  • The crucial race to take control of the U.S. Senate is coming to an end soon. In Wisconsin, Democrat Russ Feingold is running a tough race against Republican incumbent Ron Johnson. Shawn Johnson, capitol bureau chief for Wisconsin Public Radio, gives an update on the state of the race with a week to go until Election Day.
  • How are citizens and officials in other nations viewing the U.S. presidential election? Today, we go to Mexico to hear from Monica Campbell, editor of the Global Nation desk for PRI's"The World" in Mexico City.
  • For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today we hear from Christina Garcia of the Hispanic Centers community type. 
  • Trade has become a major talking point in this election, and with both candidates coming out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership, many voters are uncertain of where they stand on the issue. Despite concerns over globalization, international trade is no longer on the rise for the first time since WWII. Matthew Slaughter, dean of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth and professor of international business, explains.
  • Two years after the Russian annexation of Crimea, much of the world has forgotten about the war that continues in eastern Ukraine. Sophie Pinkham, author of "Black Square: Adventures in Post-Soviet Ukraine," spent years living in Kiev after a short stay and Russia, and captures the conflict in her new book.
  • To celebrate 40 years of punk rock, Cornell University is hosting a five day long punk rock conference starting Tuesday. For a look at how the genre has changed, we turn to Katie Alice Greer, a vocalist and lyricist for D.C.-based band Priests. Their album, "Nothing Feels Natural," will be out January 27th.


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The October Email Surprise, Actor Ethan Hawke, Voter Voices

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Mon, Oct 31, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • How will FBI Director James Comey's announcement regarding newly discovered emails related to Hillary Clinton affect the election? With just eight days to go, we hear from Takeaway Washington Todd Zwillich, who brings us the latest on the race for the White House.
  • In the run-up to Election Day, we’re reporting on how the presidential race is viewed abroad. First up, we hear from Laura Lynch, CBC reporter in Canada, who explains what our neighbors to the north are thinking.
  • Open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act begins tomorrow. Dr. Sara Collins,  the vice president of healthcare coverage and access at The Commonwealth Fund, a health policy research organization, provides useful tips on successfully finding coverage.
  • Using data from election results, economic numbers, consumer surveys and polling, the American Communities Project has mapped every single county in America and assigned it a “community type” based on different demographics. What do we know about the election when looking at these communities? Dante Chinni, director of the American Communities project and a data reporter with the Wall Street Journal, answers. 
  • For the last few months, The Takeaway has been interviewing individuals in each of the 15 community types identified by the American Communities Project to get a sense of the issues that are affecting people where they live ahead of Election Day. Today we hear from Lindsay Hansen Park of the LDS community type.
  • Last night, the National Geographic docu-series "Years of Living Dangerously" returned for a second season. Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times Columnist Thomas Friedman is a correspondent for the series, and he joins The Takeaway to explain how climate change is and isn't being covered this election season. 


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The Bundy Brothers, Chicago Accents, Victoria Woodhull

digitalmedia@pri.org (WNYC and PRI)Author: WNYC and PRI
Fri, Oct 28, 2016


Coming up on today's show:

  • Ammon and Ryan Bundy, along with five other anti-government protesters, were acquitted on Thursday of federal conspiracy and weapons charges. The charges had been brought after the group occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge for 41 days last winter. Amelia Templeton, a reporter with Oregon Public Broadcasting who has been covering the trial, has the details. 
  • The latest release from Wikileaks shows additional conflicts of interest involving the Clinton Foundation, including how a former Clinton White House aid, Doug Band, worked to obtain flights and payment for Bill Clinton and the Clinton family. Annie Karni, politics reporter for POLITICO, has the details. 
  • Evan Bayh, a former two-term U.S. senator and governor from Indiana, is attempting to win back his Senate seat in the Hoosier State as Republican Todd Young closes in on his lead. Brandon Smith, statehouse bureau chief for public radio station WFYI, brings us the latest. 
  • As Halloween approaches, Takeaway Culture Reporter Melissa Locker discusses the feminist horror films you should be watching, and Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and The Takeaway, reviews the new movies hitting the box office this weekend.
  • In the Windy City, does anyone under 50 still speak with a classic Chicago accent? You may find them tonight at the first home game for the Cubs in the World Series. Dennis Foley, author of "We Speak Chicagoese," looks back at the evolution of this distinct accent. 
  • In 1872, Victoria Woodhull ran for president of the United States at a time when women did not even have the right to vote. Her opposition called her "Satan," claiming she belonged in jail. "Mrs. President," an opera in two acts by composer and conductor Victoria Bond, tells Woodhull’s story. Bond, who is currently principal guest conductor of the Chicago Chamber Opera and artistic director of Cutting Edge Concerts New Music Festival, joins The Takeaway today. 


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