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BBC Radio Woman's Hour Podcast

BBC Radio Woman's Hour Podcast

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The programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


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http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b007qlvb

Charlotte Harris, Sheryl Sandberg, Anne Dudley

Author: BBC Radio 4
Sat, May 27, 2017


Charlotte Harris tells us about creating her first ever Show Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower show after five years of helping other designers behind the scenes. She chose an all female team to create her garden influenced by the forests and waterways of the Canadian Boreal. As part of a series looking at the experiences of children of alcoholics, we hear from Lynne who grew up in Yorkshire with an alcoholic mother who died 12 years ago from complications caused by her drinking. And Hilary Henriques the CEO of the National Association for Children of Alcoholics talks about the complexities of growing up with a parent addicted to alcohol. Megan Hunter on her debut novel The End We Start From, a story about a woman who gives birth to her first child in the middle of a life-changing environmental crisis. The Chief Operating Officer of Facebook Sheryl Sandberg talks about coping with the loss of her husband Dave who died suddenly two years ago. The songwriter, arranger, producer and television film composer Anne Dudley, has been awarded the Performing Rights Society for Music Outstanding Contribution to British Music at the Ivor Novello awards. She talks about some of her work including ABC's Lexicon of Love and the music for Poldark. And Zoe Adjonyoh Cooks the Perfect... Pan Fried Tilapia, a Ghanaian inspired dish.

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Children of alcoholics, Leanne Wood

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, May 26, 2017


Woman's Hour has invited the leaders of seven political parties to talk about their manifestos and what they would do for women. Today it's the turn of Leanne Wood the Leader of Plaid Cymru. The last in our week-long series about being the child of an alcoholic. A listener we are calling Karen, grew up with an alcoholic father who stopped drinking when she was 22. She is now 35. Liz lived with an alcoholic mother until she was 14. Karen and Liz have been friends since they met at work in their late twenties. They discuss the support their friendship has given them with their experience of growing up with an alcoholic parent. On this month's edition of Late Night Woman's Hour, Lauren and guests are talking about ageing and asking whether it's ever something we can truly make peace with. Miranda Sawyer, Michele Hanson, Ruby Hammer and Helen Small reflect on the widening gap between how we feel inside and how we look outside as we get older. The election is in two weeks time. We've been to Merthyr Tydfil to ask women there about what's on their mind when it comes to casting their vote. And we speak to Arwyn Jones, the BBC's Welsh Political Correspondent about why six seats in Wales don't have a woman on the ballot. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Leanne Wood Interviewed Guest: Michele Hanson Interviewed Guest: Miranda Sawyer Interviewed Guest: Ruby Hammer Interviewed Guest: Helen Small Interviewed Guest: Arwyn Jones.

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Late Night Woman's Hour: Ageing

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, May 26, 2017


"What do you mean I'm going to sag? Sag WHERE?" These days the world seems full of well-intentioned cat-poster sentiment designed to cheer us up over the passage of time -You're only as young as you feel, 70 is the new 40 - but for women in particular, advancing age can mean a sense of panic. Lauren invites writer and broadcaster Miranda Sawyer, cultural historian Helen Small, founder of the Ruby & Millie makeup range Ruby Hammer and writer and Guardian columnist Michele Hanson to provide LNWH listeners with a toolkit - philosophical, cultural, emotional, sartorial - for getting older. Presenter Lauren Laverne.

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Children of alcoholics: Supporting a parent who's trying to quit. Author Megan Hunter. Cook the Perfect Pan-Fried Tilapia.

Author: BBC Radio 4
Thu, May 25, 2017


As part of our Children of Alcoholics Season we hear from listener Camilla who's supporting her dad with his recovery and hear from Hilary Henriques, the CEO of the National Association for Children of Alcoholics, about helping a parent. The End We Start is the debut novel from Megan Hunter who'll be talking about how the themes of motherhood and being a refugee interlink. Plus Zoe Adjonyoh's showcases Ghana's ingredients and cooking methods in her new cookbook and shares how to incorporate those ingredients easily into everyday dishes. She'll be in the Studio teaching Jenni to Cook the Perfect...Pan-fried Tilapia Presenter Jenni Murray Producer Beverley Purcell.

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Parenting: Children and trauma

Author: BBC Radio 4
Wed, May 24, 2017


In the light of the Manchester attacks how do we talk to children about what has happened? Nicky Cox, Editor of First News and Child Psychologist Dr Sunny Kleo join Jane to give advice to parents, grandparents and carers about how to talk to children of different ages about the things they will be seeing on TV or on social media.

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Sheryl Sandberg, Diana Quick, Alcoholics, Trauma

Author: BBC Radio 4
Wed, May 24, 2017


This interview with Sheryl Sandberg, the chief operating officer at Facebook was recorded before the tragic events in Manchester. This is Sheryl Sandberg's very personal account of how she has tried to come to terms with the sudden death of her husband Dave. In her new book Option B, written with a psychologist called Adam Grant, she examines resilience. Actor Diana Quick tells Jane Garvey about her part in a new production of Babette's Feast. Next in our series about growing up the child of an alcoholic, the story of Jackie, known as Jabs, age 22, whose father died two years ago as a direct result of his drinking. Since his death Jabs had become a member of Nacoa (The National Association for Children of Alcoholics), and is keen to help and connect with other young people with similar experiences. Our reporter, Jo Morris met Jabs at her home In Leeds. Joan Smith, feminist and author of Misogynies and Alison Phillips from the Daily Mirror talk about the effects on children of the Manchester Arena attacks. Presenter: Jane Garvey.

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Children and trauma, Charlotte Harris at Chelsea, Children of alcoholics, Tasha Eurich

Author: BBC Radio 4
Tue, May 23, 2017


In the light of the Manchester attack how do we talk to children about what has happened? Nicky Cox, Editor of First News and Child Psychologist Dr Sunny Kleo join Jane to give advice to parents, grandparents and carers about how to talk to children of different ages about the things they will be seeing on TV or on social media. And, for younger children, are there useful tips for minimising and contextualising their distress? Hilary's mother lost herself to alcohol and no one in the family ever talked about it, apart from Uncle David. He intervened and persuaded Hilary's mum to stop drinking while her daughter was doing her A levels. Reporter Jo Morris accompanied Hilary on a visit to see Uncle David, now 91, to hear her story of being the child of an alcoholic. The second in a series. Charlotte Harris has won a gold medal for her first ever Show Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show. One of only two women amongst the show garden designers on Main Avenue, she heads an all-female design team. Her garden is influenced by the forests and waterways of the Canadian Boreal, a vast breath-taking area of forested natural habitat, which stretches across Canada, Scandinavia and Siberia. Jane joins Charlotte in her show garden. Dr Tasha Eurich is a psychologist and performance coach and she'll be speaking to Jane about her new book 'Insight' which focuses on the power of self-awareness. Are we damaging our children and ourselves with over-praising and unrealistic ideas about our own abilities? Photo credit: Chris Christodoulou.

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Childcare, Composer Anne Dudley, Children of alcoholics, Craft prize

Author: BBC Radio 4
Mon, May 22, 2017


As the general election gets nearer we take a look at childcare and ask listeners how they think childcare could be made easier, more convenient and more affordable. Anne Dudley has just been an awarded the PRS for Music Outstanding Contribution to British Music at the Ivor Novello awards, for her work as a songwriter, arranger, producer and television film composer. Her music ranges from ABC's Lexion of Love album to the soundtrack to Poldark and the film The Full Monty The launch of a new series on children of alcoholics. We asked you to get in touch if you had been affected by this subject, and many of you did. Over the series we will be hearing about some of your experiences. We start with Lynne who grew up in Yorkshire with an alcoholic mother who died twelve years ago from complications caused by her drinking. Jo Morris is the reporter. 1500 applicants, 29 judges, a lot of deliberation and some amazing work... we had a fantastic array of entrants for the Woman's Hour Craft Prize but there can only be 12 finalists who will get to show at the Victoria and Albert Museum exhibition in September. Today we find out who they are.

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The Guilty Crush, Karen Elson, Hibo Wadere

Author: BBC Radio 4
Sat, May 20, 2017


We discuss why Superintendent Ted Hastings in the BBC's Line of Duty is the ultimate guilty crush. Adrian Dunbar who plays Ted Hastings and the author Kathy Lette discuss the appeal of the unreconstructed male. We'll hear from the anti FGM campaigner Hibo Wardere about her recent trip to Senegal where she met communities who have abandoned the practice of FGM. The Oldham born model Karen Elson talks about her life as a singer songwriter in Nashville. We discuss the merits of school residential trips with James Wynne, Head of Science at Chesterfield School in Crosby and teacher Pamela Butchart author of children's book, There's a Werewolf in my Tent. Documentary maker Sue Bourne on her latest film talking to people who have been told they have a terminal illness. Lisa Keech talks about the difference her cancer diagnosis has made to her life. What makes someone want to go on holiday with their mother? We hear from Kate Lee who took her mum away in 2001 and 2008 when her dementia became more apparent and 24 year old Gena Mour Barrett who goes on holiday with her mum every year. And the women who made swimming possible in the 19th Century: the writer and keen swimmer Jenny Landreth on her book Swell.

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Children of black American GIs, Going on holiday with mum, Salome at the National Theatre

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, May 19, 2017


Carole Travers from Poole in Dorset is one of a number of mixed heritage children born to African-American fathers who were stationed in the UK during World War II. With their husbands away fighting the war, some women had relationships and children with them. Fiona Clampin talks to Carole who's been trying to trace her father the whole of her adult life, and to John who is still deeply affected by his early experiences. With the Election looming, we're in Sunderland talking to some women about the issue that most concern them. The South African playwright and theatre director Yael Farber discusses her new play Salome, at The National Theatre, a radical revision of the biblical tale. And the joys and pitfalls of going on holiday with your mum no matter what age you are. Presenter Jenni Murray Producer Beverley Purcell.

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Rachel Nickell's son, Sporting boards, Karen Elson, Guilty crush

Author: BBC Radio 4
Thu, May 18, 2017


Alex Hanscombe was just two years old, going on three, when his mother Rachel Nickell was murdered on Wimbledon Common in 1992. He spoke to Andrea Catherwood about his book 'Letting Go' which describes what happened that morning and the devastating effect it had on him, his father and his extended family. The FA may increase the percentage of women on its board to 30%. Only half of the 68 Sport England and UK Sport funded national governing bodies actually meet this target. Why? Baroness Sue Campbell, Head of Women's Football at the FA and BBC Sports journalist Katie Gornall discuss possible reforms to sporting boards. Oldham-born, Nashville-based, singer-songwriter Karen Elson on her modelling career, turning to music, the influence of her previous marriage to musician Jack White and following their divorce, returning to her English roots and personal themes in her new album, Double Roses. Superintendent Ted Hastings of the BBC's Line of Duty series has been described on social media as TV's most unlikely sex symbol and a guilty crush, despite coming across as a little bit sexist. Jenni is joined by the actor Adrian Dunbar who plays Hastings and the author Kathy Lette to talk about the appeal of the unreconstructed male.

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Judy Garland, Catharine MacKinnon, School trips

Author: BBC Radio 4
Wed, May 17, 2017


Judy Garland has become an enduring icon to millions of fans of all generations around the world. She is often perceived as a tragic figure but in a new play Judy! at the Arts Theatre in London she is portrayed and celebrated as a survivor in a man's world. The writer Ray Rackham and Belinda Woolston who takes on the role of Judy discuss her story. Belinda will also perform one of her songs live in the studio. Catharine MacKinnon is a lawyer, a radical feminist scholar, a political activist and a passionate advocate for ending inequalities and abuse in women's lives. Jenni talks to her about her new book Butterfly Politics, the coming together of forty years of her work which has been defined by the central concerns of gender inequality, putting an end to sexual harassment, rape, pornography and prostitution. School trips can be educational, adventurous, fun and costly. What are the merits of getting back to basics and going camping? Or is that too much effort? James Wynne, Head of Science at Chesterfield School in Crosby, who has recently introduced his year 11s to virtual reality school outings and Pamela Butchart, author of the children's book "There's a Werewolf in My Tent" discuss the pros and cons of residential school trips. And more from Women in One, a collection of audio snapshots in which Abigail Hollick talks to women of all ages and backgrounds about their lives. Abigail meets a woman at a bus station in Glasgow. Presenter: Andrea Catherwood Producer: Dianne McGregor.

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Parenting: School trips - camping V virtual reality

Author: BBC Radio 4
Wed, May 17, 2017


School trips can be educational, adventurous, fun... and costly. What are the merits of getting back to basics and going camping? Or is that too much effort? James Wynne, Head of Science at Chesterfield School in Crosby, who has recently introduced his year 11s to virtual reality school outings and Pamela Butchart, author of the children’s book “There’s a Werewolf in My Tent” discuss the pros and cons of residential school trips.

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Three Girls, Living with a terminal illness, Juggling care and work

Author: BBC Radio 4
Tue, May 16, 2017


This week a drama based on the Rochdale sex abuse scandal is being broadcast over three consecutive nights on BBC One. It portrays the experiences of girls who were groomed in Rochdale between 2008 and 2012, for which nine men were convicted and sentenced. The drama explores how these girls were groomed, and why, despite repeated referrals from sexual health worker Sara Rowbotham, the police, social services and the CPS failed respond to the problem. The actor Maxine Peake plays Sara Rowbotham in the drama and they both join Jane to talk about it. The experience of those caring for family members who are ill is something we discuss on Woman's Hour often. In light of the Conservative manifesto pledge to give people the right to up to a year of unpaid leave to look after a relative full time while retaining rights to their job, we speak to three listeners about how they managed. Documentary maker Sue Bourne on her new film, A Time To Live which features twelve people who've been told they have a terminal illness and may only have months to live. Sue says, "I didn't want to make a film about dying but about living. I wanted to speak to people who'd decided that if they only had a short time left they were going to make the most of that time." One of her interviewees is Lisa Keech: a mother of two teenage girls, she insists a cancer diagnosis, while devastating, has improved the quality of her life. Presented by Jane Garvey Produced by Jane Thurlow.

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Rupi Kaur, Financial abuse, Swimming Suffragettes

Author: BBC Radio 4
Mon, May 15, 2017


The Canadian poet and vlogger, Rupi Kaur, became famous when she took photographs of herself during her period. Nothing graphic, but the blood on show wasn't to the liking of Instagram who took the pictures down. She's in London at the moment reading poems from her collection Milk And Honey, so she'll be in the studio to talk about her writing, her nomadic life and how she recovered from a sexual assault. Who's in control of the purse strings in your relationship? In extreme situations money can be used as a tool to control others. We discuss financial abuse with an expert in the subject, Dr Nicola Sharp-Jeffs. She's been exploring how other countries deal with it, and whether we can adopt some of their policies to make it easier for victims. We also speak to a woman who's had first-hand experience of it. A year ago we spoke to the Somali-born, anti FGM campaigner, Hibo Wardere, about her experience of being cut at the age of six and how it's affected every part of her life. She joins Jane to talk about her recent visit to Senegal where she met communities who have abandoned FGM. As outdoor pools open their doors for the summer and women pull out their costumes and caps, it's time to reflect on the 'swimming suffragettes' who made women's swimming possible. The sport was exclusively male in the 19th century, so women turned to 'secret swimming' and fought for poolside equality. Writer and keen swimmer, Jenny Landreth, has a new 'waterbiography' out called, Swell. She joins us to talk about the 'swimming suffragettes' and her own great love of swimming.

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Phina Oruche, Fostering, The Greedy Queen

Author: BBC Radio 4
Sat, May 13, 2017


The actress Phina Oruche has always used her platform to highlight the importance of diversity in film and television. She tells us about her new one woman show, Identity Crisis and the complexity of being British-Nigerian and a proud Scouser. After a photo of 14 black male undergraduates admitted to the University of Cambridge in 2015 went viral we ask what about the black female students at Oxbridge? We hear from Imani Shola who vlogs about her experience at Cambridge, Courtney Daniella Boateng a former president of the Afro Caribbean society at Cambridge and Naomi Kellman who runs Target Oxbridge a scheme to support black students who want to apply to the universities. We hear from Anna Watkins, Patron of the Women's Sport Trust and Olympic gold medalist, and Mel Bound who started This Mum Runs: both were honoured for their achievements in sport at the BeAGameChanger awards this week. What makes a good foster carer and how do you get suitable candidates to apply? Debbie Douglas has been fostering for 25 years, she and her daughter Lydia Bright (a star of the reality TV show TOWIE) discuss their experience with Jackie Edwards a professional advisor with Foster Talk. The trafficking of people for labour and sexual exploitation is now the second most lucrative criminal commodity after drugs in the world. We hear from Jim Laird a human trafficking expert on why it's happening and what needs to be done. Food historian Dr Annie Gray tells us about Queen Victoria's love of food. Her book The Greedy Queen examines what she ate, when and with whom and pays tribute to some of the people who cooked for her. Why do women choose to shave their heads? And why is it considered to be subversive when they do? We hear from occasional head shaver Lucy Jones and from Liv Little who has been shaving her head since she was 19. Presented by Jenni Murray Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Jane Thurlow.

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Sporting game-changers, 'adulting', Woman's Hour craft prize

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, May 12, 2017


Olympic medallist Anna Watkins on sporting game-changers who've been honoured for their achievements at the BeAGameChanger awards. Did you cook dinner from scratch last night? Or remember to take the bins out? Congratulations on some great 'adulting'! Scroll through the #adulting hashtag on Twitter and you'll see it basically means you're getting on with life's dull bits. But why celebrate it? We ask Daisy Buchanan why Generation Y need to pat themselves on the back for the most mundane of tasks, and then tell everyone about it. In the last in our series on the seven disciplines included in the Woman's Hour Craft Prize we find out what's in the "Other" category with Deirdre Figueiredo director of Craftspace, a craft development charity, and Helen Ingham, specialist technician in the letterpress printing workshop at London's Central Saint Martins. The Women's Equality Party launches its manifesto on Friday afternoon - so why is party leader Sophie Walker inviting other parties to steal its policies ahead of the launch? The contemporary story of a single mother, Maddy, is woven into a new production of Euripides' Medea at the Bristol Old Vic. The narrative is of two women who exist thousands of years apart, both seeking retribution against injustice at the hands of the men they loved. Joining Jenni writer Chino Odimba and actor Akiya Henry who takes on both the roles of Maddy and Meda in an all-female cast.

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Shaving Your Head, Anxiety, Asian Woman of Achievement Awards

Author: BBC Radio 4
Thu, May 11, 2017


Model Cara Delevingne recently made headlines by appearing at the Met Gala with a shaved head. She is one of a handful of female celebrities, to do it. Why do women choose to shave their heads? Jenni speaks to occasional head-shaver Lucy Jones and to Liv Little who has been shaving her head since she was 19. Woman's Hour made a documentary about anxiety with singer songwriter Laura Mvula about her own experiences of anxiety. According to the ONS young women like her are much more likely to report they're suffering from anxiety than their male counterparts. To mark Mental Health Awareness Week, we're joined by Dr Louise Theodosiou from the Royal College of Psychiatrists and Woman's Hour listener Tess who shares her experience. We find out about a new scheme in Germany - the mentoring group Welcome Mamas . It pairs up refugees who are pregnant or have babies and helps them navigate their way round the health care system. Human trafficking in Scotland. A BBC Scotland documentary reports that people are now the second most lucrative criminal commodity after drugs, Many of the women trafficked are forced into sham marriages with men seeking to apply for residency in the UK. Jim Laird a human trafficking expert talks about why it's happening and what he thinks needs to be done. And we hear from two of the winners of the Asian Women of Achievement Awards an annual event, celebrating the work and contribution of Asian women in British society Fatima Zaman winner of the NatWest Chairman's Award and Sofia Buncy who won in the Social & Humanitarian Category. Presenter; Jenni Murray Producer; Beverley Purcell.

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Parenting: Fostering

Author: BBC Radio 4
Wed, May 10, 2017


Over 63,000 young people were in care in the UK last year and there's a need for many more foster families. So, what makes a good foster carer and how do you get suitable candidates to apply? Jane is joined by The Only Way is Essex (TOWIE) stars Debbie Douglas and her daughter, Lydia Bright who are fostering ambassadors for the Department for Education and Jackie Edwards, professional adviser with Foster Talk.

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Phina Oruche, Fostering, The "Bunny Boiler"

Author: BBC Radio 4
Wed, May 10, 2017


Actress Phina Oruche talks about being pigeon-holed and fighting against it. She's got her own one-man show called Identity Crisis. Crazy, hysterical, bunny boiler. This is how women are described regularly, going all the way back to Greek mythology. Many women have had the uncomfortable experience of being called "crazy" especially when relationships hit a bumpy patch or come to an end. A new film called UNFORGETTABLE, starring Katherine Heigl, plays on this trope. Jane discusses it with journalists Arwa Mahdawi and Alya Mooro. Making the tea at work: does it get you want you want, or does it conform to secretarial stereotypes? Dr Eve Poole, an expert in management and leadership who has a new book out called LEADERSMITHING, says good manners are at the heart of being a successful leader and that means making a brew. Over 63,000 children and young people were in care in the UK last year and there's a need for many more foster families. So, what makes a good foster carer and how do you get suitable candidates to apply? Jane is joined by two stars from the reality TV show The Only Way is Essex (TOWIE), Debbie Douglas, and her daughter, Lydia Bright. They're fostering ambassadors for the Department for Educatio and Debbie has fostered over 250 children. Lydia has grown up all her life with foster siblings. At the start of Foster Care Fortnight, they talk about the reality of looking after children in care along with Jackie Edwards, Professional Adviser with Foster Talk.

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The Greedy Queen, Body hair, Lichen Sclerosus

Author: BBC Radio 4
Tue, May 09, 2017


We now talk more openly about miscarriage, but what about those who have to go through the 'medical management' of a pregnancy loss? Lou Conran talks about her experience of having to give birth to her daughter Emma at just over 20 weeks following an abnormal scan which indicated her baby wouldn't survive. Alongside her is Chris Navin, the midwife and bereavement counsellor who's helped her come to terms with it. Food historian Dr Annie Gray tells us about Queen Victoria's diet. From nursery food to state banquets, Chinese and Indian food, her passion for the haggis and shortbread of her beloved Scotland. Anne's book, The Greedy Queen, Eating with Victoria examines what the monarch ate, when, and with whom; and pays tribute to some of the people who cooked for her. Watching the weather forecast and preparing to ditch the 50 denier tights for the summer? We hear from a young woman whose worries about her body hair have plagued her for years. Fear about what others will think has affected what she wears and even her relationship choices. In our programme on 1 May we discussed women and cycling. One of our guests was the consultant dermatologist, and vulval health specialist, Dr Jane Sterling. She mentioned the condition, lichen sclerosus. Dr Fiona Lewis, one of the UK's leading dermatologists specialising in vulval dermatology - she tell us more about the symptoms and treatment. Presented by Jane Garvey Produced by Jane Thurlow.

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Are Women as likely as Men to Vote in the General Election? Walking Netball

Author: BBC Radio 4
Mon, May 08, 2017


The new French President Emmanuel Macron says he wants to formalise the role of First Lady and give his wife Brigitte a public role. We discuss. A photo of 14 black male Cambridge students went viral this week, highlighting that just 15 black male undergraduates were admitted to the university in 2015. How similar is the situation for black British female students at Oxford and Cambridge? We speak to Cambridge University students and vloggers Courtney Daniella Boateng and Imani Shola, and to Naomi Kellman who runs Target Oxbridge and was a student at Oxford University. There has been a push this year at grassroots level to get more women playing netball, including the gentler version, walking netball. Henrietta Harrison went to see a team in Nottingham. And are women are likely as men to vote in the General Election? It's been claimed in the past that there were millions of missing women voters and a gender voting gap that was growing bigger - was that true, and what happened in 2015?

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Shakira Martin NUS President, Endangered crafts, Vulval health

Author: BBC Radio 4
Sat, May 06, 2017


Shakira Martin is the new President of the National Union of Students. She discusses her rise to the top and how she is proud to be described as a Black single mother from a working class family. What is it like raising mixed race children? How important are cultural values when your child has a duel heritage? Fariba Soetan runs a parenting advice blog for mixed race families, and Laura Kirwan-Ashman, a freelance filmmaker whose work focuses on the experiences of young mixed race women. We hear from four women involved in street prostitution in Hull. Renatta, Porscha, Jemma and Millie tell their stories which makes up part of an anthology of work called An Untold Story. Two couples in the US discuss "embryo adoption". Rebecca and Chris Henderson from Buffalo in New York have three daughters through IVF. They donated their remaining embryos to Kelli and Dan Gassman from Oregon, and they now have a daughter and a son. Seventeen crafts have been identified as being critically endangered according to the Heritage Crafts Association. We hear from paper marbler Victoria Hall, a horse collar maker Victoria Hetherington and Greta Bertram project manager for the Red List of Endangered Crafts. Loujean came to the UK from Syria. She moved into the spare room of Lucy Pavia and her husband Will. Lucy and Loujean talk about what it was like to live together when they had only just met. And we discuss how best to look after your vulval health if you are a keen cyclist from Dr Jane Sterling a Consultant dermatologist at Addenbrooke's hospital in Cambridge and who's worked with elite British cyclist. Presented by Jane Garvey Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Beverley Purcell.

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Nepal, Hosting a Refugee, Maternal Mental Health

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, May 05, 2017


We travel to a village in Nepal where women and girls have to remain separate from the rest of the community when they're having their periods. What would it be like to host a refugee? We speak to Lucy Pavia who did just that a few weeks after she got married, as well as Loujean who arrived from Syria with just one pink, wheely suitcase and is now studying for a law degree. In our celebration of craft, we shine the spotlight on wood and furniture and speak to a furniture maker and a woodturner. We continue our exploration of maternal mental health. Our reporter Jac Philimore, who experienced perinatal anxiety herself, talks to two women who struggled with anxiety and depression when they became mothers.

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Save the Children founder, Women leaving science, Disappearing crafts

Author: BBC Radio 4
Thu, May 04, 2017


Eglantyne Jebb was an Edwardian human rights activist who set up Save The Children. She also drafted a set of guidelines about looking after children properly which evolved into what we know now as the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. We talk to the actress, Anne Chamberlain about her one-woman show celebrating Eglantyne which is soon to be performed at the Central Family Court in London. The cost to the UK economy of losing Women from STEM academic roles is a huge ?2 billion a year. Across STEM subjects, 33% of the intake at undergraduate level is female, and in biology that figure is much higher. Yet only 9% of women make it to professor level. So why are STEM subjects still failing to retain female academics? We hear from two women who've left careers in science, and from Professor Polly Arnold from Edinburgh University about what she's doing to tackle the problem. New research from the Heritage Crafts Association has found many traditional craft skills in the UK are on the brink of extinction. Seventeen crafts have been identified as being critically endangered, including coach and wagon making, saw making, metal thread making, and swill basket making. Greta Bertram, project manager for the Red List of Endangered Crafts, Victoria Hall, paper marbler and horse collar maker Kate Hetherington join Jenni to discuss. Hull Lighthouse is a charity who support women involved in street prostitution in the city. An anthology of work they have written about their lives has been published in a book called An Untold Story. We hear from Renatta, Porscha, Jemma and Millie; and Emma Crick, the project facilitator, explains why this book is so important and what it's meant to the women who took part. Presented by Jenni Murray Produced by Jane Thurlow.

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Raising mixed-race children

Author: BBC Radio 4
Wed, May 03, 2017


The most recent research from the Office for National Statistics suggests that more than 950,000 people in England identify as "mixed race". How do parents raise children whose ethnic identity is different from their own? How important are cultural values when your child has a dual-heritage? Fariba Soetan's daughters are Iranian-Nigerian and she runs a parenting advice blog specifically for mixed race families. Laura Kirwan-Ashman is a filmmaker whose work focuses on the experiences of young mixed race women. Her parents are white British and black Caribbean. Ian Paterson was a trusted and well respected breast surgeon, but last week a court found him guilty of intentionally wounding nine women and one man. Gail Boichat was one of those affected; she was convinced by Ian Paterson that she had breast cancer when she didn't and underwent a mastectomy. Kashmir Uppal is a medical negligence lawyer who represented Gail and many others who were treated by Ian Paterson. In February the report 'Maternal Mental Health - Women's Voices' was published. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists surveyed more than 2300 women across the UK asking for their experiences to find out how services could better support perinatal mental health for expectant and new mothers. The following month, NHS England published a 5 year plan boosting the number of mental health mother and baby units and increasing the number of specialist perinatal mental health teams. But as our reporter Jac Philimore discovered, these problems aren't easy to talk about, or even recognise in the first few months of new motherhood. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Laura Northedge.

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Shakira Martin, and embryo 'adoption' in the US

Author: BBC Radio 4
Tue, May 02, 2017


Shakira Martin, the new President of the National Union of Students: her rise to the top, the challenges and triumphs of her career, and why she's proud to call herself a, "black single mother from a working class family." Embryo 'adoption'. In the US some people are opting to 'adopt' donated embryos so they can have a family. Jane speaks to two couples who donated and 'adopted' embryos, and to US legal journalist Rebecca Buckwalter-Poza and bioethicist Lucy Frith of Liverpool University. Coaching women's sport. What can be achieved if sports coaching is adapted specifically to women? Jane is joined by GB Women's Hockey Head Coach, Danny Kerry, and by UK Sport Performance Director, Chelsea Warr, who worked with author Owen Slot on new book, The Talent Lab: The Secrets Of Creating & Sustaining Success. And Sarah Schmidt on her debut novel about Lizzie Borden, the woman who was tried and acquitted of killing her father and stepmother in 1892. After Sarah learnt about Lizzie, she began to haunt her dreams and so Sarah spent the next 11 years turning her story into a novel, See What I Have Done. Presenter: Jane Garvey Producer: Emma Wallace.

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Women and bikes

Author: BBC Radio 4
Mon, May 01, 2017


We celebrate women and cycling at the London Bike Kitchen. Rochelle Gilmore, Commonwealth gold medalist and former professional cyclist, is now owner and manager of the Wiggle High5 Pro Cycling team. She's joined by one of her riders British cyclist Grace Garner to discuss women's road racing today. Mountainbiker, Tracy Moseley talks to Jane Garvey about the thrill of racing downhill. Podcaster and blogger Sarah Connolly explains how social media is changing the way women's competitive cycling is being covered. Astrid Swenson, senior lecturer in European History at Brunel University, tells us about the role of bikes in women's emancipation. Dr Jane Sterling, consultant dermatologist at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge explains how she's been advising the elite world of British Cycling on vulval health. And Jenni Gwiazdowski teaches Jane how to mend a puncture. Presented by Jane Garvey Produced by Jane Thurlow.

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Late Night Woman's Hour: Breakups

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Apr 28, 2017


Emma Barnett and guests Sali Hughes, Philippa Perry and Daisy Buchanan discuss break-ups.

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Valerie June, the WI opens a branch in prison and are sex robots a danger to human intimacy?

Author: BBC Radio 4
Sat, Apr 29, 2017


The Tennessee singer-songwriter Valerie June performs a track from her latest album The Order of Time. Are sex robots a danger to human intimacy? The race is on to develop the first commercial sex robot for the mass market, the journalist Jenny Kleeman describes what they look like and how they work. And, Dr Kathleen Richardson, Senior Research Fellow in the Ethics of Robotics and Dr Kate Devlin senior lecturer in computing discuss if they are the ultimate in sexual objectification or an opportunity to improve of experience of sex. The Women's Institute has opened a branch in a women's prison. Countess Bathurst, the former High Sheriff of Gloucestershire, is one of the founders of the group at HMP Eastwood Park. Jenny Earle, is the Programme Director for reducing women's imprisonment at the Prison Reform Trust, they explain the benefits of such a group in prison. A 'Please Offer Me a Seat' badge for those less able to stand on public transport is launched. We hear from Amanda, a cervical cancer survivor who still experiences pain following radical surgery and Amy, who suffers from lupus, on the challenges they face on public transport with a hidden illness. We hear from Rachel Malik on her debut novel Miss Boston and Miss Hargreaves. It tells the story of Rachel's grandmother who abandoned her children, lived as a lesbian and was tried for murder. What's the impact on grandparents when adult children decide to take their young family and move abroad? We hear from Mary a listener whose son and daughter-in-law are taking their three young children to the other side of the globe and Helen Russell a British mum who now lives in Denmark. Clinical psychologist Dr Angharad Rudkin offers advice on maintaining relationships. Lady Macbeth is a film about a women in a loveless marriage set in 19th century rural Northumberland. It stars BAFTA breakthrough Brit actress Florence Pugh who tells us about the role and Alice Birch the screenwriter discusses the appeal of such a dark story. Presented by Jenni Murray Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Erin Riley.

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Artist blacksmith Agnes Jones; Author Rachel Malik and the WI in prisons

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Apr 28, 2017


A focus on working with metal with Agnes Jones an artist blacksmith and Corinne Julius, critic and curator - as we continue to explore the seven disciplines included in the Woman's Hour Craft Prize. The appointment of Saudi Arabia to serve a four year term on The Commission on the Status of Women has been widely condemned because of its record on promoting gender equality. Jenni talks to Hanan Razek, BBC Reporter from the Arabic Service. The Women's Institute better known for jam making and flower arranging, has has just opened a new branch in a women's prison. Countess Bathurst one of the founders of the Group and Jenny Earle from the Prison Reform Trust talk about how it's helping women on the inside. Presenter Jenni Murray Producer Beverley Purcell.

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Late Night Woman's Hour: Viv Albertine

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Mar 31, 2017


Lauren Laverne interviews Viv Albertine at the Free Thinking festival for the first edition of BBC Radio 4's Late Night Woman's Hour to be recorded in front of an audience. Writer and film maker Albertine reflects on being the guitarist in pioneering all-female punk band The Slits, whose 1979 album Cut is frequently voted one of the most influential albums of all time. But - as she outlines in her autobiography Clothes, Clothes, Clothes, Music, Music, Music, Boys, Boys, Boys - she hasn't always had an easy relationship with her punk past, and when her daughter was born, Albertine initially didn't tell her about her part in the punk revolution. Following the breakup of The Slits, Albertine briefly worked as an aerobics instructor before going on to film-making, acting (she took a lead role in Joanna Hogg's 2013 film Exhibition) and a solo recording career (debut solo album The Vermilion Border was released in 2012). When her autobiography was first published, with its frank reflections on (amongst other things) masturbation, sex, the punk ethos, IVF, and marriage, Albertine confessed to journalist Alexis Petridis that she worried "have I gone too far? I always go too far." In a frank and funny conversation, Albertine reflects on the resurgence of feminism after the 'desert' of the 1980s, the vital role her daughter played in her decision to return to music, and the advantages of not caring too much what people think.

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Late Night Woman's Hour: Instinct

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Feb 24, 2017


"The hackles on the back of my neck stand up and the orange warning signs come on." You know the feeling. It's the emotional equivalent of seeing something out of the corner of your eye. So fleeting you're not sure it's real. She's lying, it says. Or maybe, don't call him back. Or perhaps just, something's not right. So do you trust it, this feeling, or brush it aside? And if you do trust it, what do you call it? Instinct or intuition? Sixth sense? Your bulls**t detector? Whatever name you prefer, there's no doubt that - historically speaking - it gets a mixed press. At best perhaps, it's the preserve of animals. At worst, it's downright witchy. By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes. Because after all, where does it come from, this information? Some kind of dialup to the spirit realm? Or could there be a scientific explanation? Lauren Laverne and guests businesswoman Hilary Devey, neuroscientist Sophie Scott, anthropologist Kit Davis and former detective Mo Dowdy explore the benefits and frustrations of trusting your instincts.

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Family Drug and Alcohol Courts, Sandi Toksvig, Allison Schroeder

Author: BBC Radio 4
Mon, Feb 13, 2017


We discuss the future of Family Drug and Alcohol Courts in the UK. They try and find solutions for parents who have addictions and are at risk of losing their children. But despite some success it seems funding for the scheme is under threat. Jane is joined by Sophie Kershaw, Co-Director of the Family Drug and Alcohol National Unit, and Rosie, a mother who's managed to keep her third child with her because of these courts, despite losing two already. We speak to Allison Schroeder, screenwriter of Hidden Figures. It's a new film about a trio of African-American women who did the maths behind a voyage around the earth in the early days of the Space Race. She talks about this unknown and inspirational story, as well as her own personal connections to NASA. TV and radio all-rounder, Sandi Toksvig, talks to Jane about her new play called Silver Lining, as well as family life, her plans for when she's older and making the world a fairer and more equal place for women.

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Late Night Woman's Hour

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Dec 30, 2016


Lauren Laverne discusses the delights and perils of parties with seasoned partygoers Fran Cutler, Brigid Keenan, Bryony Gordon and Zing Tsjeng. Fran Cutler is the queen of party organisers, and thinks nothing of dialling Cher's number to ask her to perform at one of her legendary 'dos. Writer Bryony Gordon is a former 3am girl whose idea of a good night out is a party for two in her back garden with her husband. Editor of UK Broadly, Zing Tsjeng, is no stranger to the coolest parties in town, but always leaves at 3am when the 'blue plastic bag brigade' switch off Britney and start playing intelligent dance music. Writer Brigid Keenan is a former 'trailing diplomatic spouse' and once spent an entire party locked in a loo, dressed as Mary Queen of Scots. They are your guides for this Late Night Woman's Hour on partying. So have you fixed your hair? Lined your stomach? Drunk a glass of water? Your taxi is waiting.... The broadcast edition of this programme will be available on Iplayer soon after transmission. A longer version will be available as a podcast.

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Late Night Woman's Hour

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Nov 25, 2016


She's your BFF, your Bestie. Thelma to your Louise, or Eddie to your Patsy. This month on Late Night Woman's Hour, Lauren Laverne discusses female friendship, its rules, strengths and weaknesses, and how it changes over time, with psychologist Terri Apter, novelist Lucy Caldwell, Into Film journalist Ceyda Uzun and Julie-Ann Richards and Sarah Adams-Greener, two Woman's Hour listeners who have been friends since they were three. This programme is available in two versions. The long version is podcast only and is available by clicking the MP3 button on the Late Night Woman's Hour programme page or subscribing to the Woman's Hour daily podcast. The shorter broadcast version will be available on Iplayer shortly after transmission on Friday 25th November. Lucy Caldwell's collection of short stories, Multitudes, is published by Faber. Here We Are, Lucy's short story about two young women falling in love in 1990s Belfast, first appeared in Granta.

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Late Night Woman's Hour: Home

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Oct 28, 2016


Lauren Laverne and guests discuss home. What does home mean to you? Is domesticity a joy or a drudgery? And why has the Scandinavian art of Hygge become the word of the winter? Is it genius marketing or emotional need? Joining Lauren are: Trine Hahnemann, Chef and author of 'Scandinavian Comfort Food - Embracing the Arts of Hygge'. Susie Orbach, psychotherapist and author. Dr Rachel Hurdley, Research Fellow in the School of Social Science at Cardiff University Helen Zaltzman, podcaster and crafter. This programme is available in two versions. The long version is podcast only and is available by clicking the MP3 button on the Late Night Woman's Hour programme page or subscribing to the Woman's Hour daily podcast. The shorter broadcast version will be available on Iplayer shortly after transmission on Friday 28th October. Presenter: Lauren Laverne Producer: Eleanor Garland Guest: Susie Orbach Guest: Rachel Hurdley Guest: Trine Hahnemann Guest: Helen Zaltzman.

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Late Night Woman's Hour: Public Space

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Sep 30, 2016


Where does private space for women end and public space begin? Where does a woman's right to wear, or walk, or say, what and where she wants become different to men's - on the beach? On the bus? Online? Joining Lauren Laverne to discuss: Shelina Janmohamed, author of Generation M Helen Lewis, Deputy Editor of the New Statesman Becca Bunce of the disabled women's collective Sisters of Frida and co-director of the I C CHANGE campaign Bridget Minamore journalist This programme is available in two versions. The long version is podcast only and is available by clicking the MP3 button on the Late Night Woman's Hour programme page or subscribing to the Woman's Hour daily podcast. The shorter broadcast version will be available on Iplayer shortly after transmission on Friday 30th September. Presenter: Lauren Laverne Producer: Eleanor Garland.

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Late Night Woman's Hour: Sport

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Aug 26, 2016


Following the massive success of female athletes on Team GB in the Rio Olympics, Lauren Laverne discusses women in sport with: Maggie Alphonsi, World Cup-winning rugby player and sports commentator and pundit Cherrelle Brown, champion boxer and personal trainer Anna Kessel, sports writer and author of Eat Sweat Play Jean Williams, Professor of the History and Culture of Sport at DeMontfort University Producer: Luke Mulhall.

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Late Night Woman's Hour: Masturbation

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Jun 24, 2016


Lauren Laverne and guests discuss women and masturbation - is it still a taboo? Her guests this month are: Emily Yates, accessibility consultant and sex educator with the charity Enhance the UK. Irma Kurtz, who has been the agony aunt for Cosmopolitan Magazine since 1970. Ky Hoyle, the founder and Managing Director of the Sh! Women's Erotic Emporium. Stephanie Theobald, a writer whose most recent book Sex Drive is a memoir of her drive across America in search of her lost libido. Producer: Luke Mulhall.

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Late Night Woman's Hour

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, May 27, 2016


Lauren Laverne and guests discuss the origins and pitfalls of stereotypes of women. With Joanne Harris, best-selling author of Chocolat who has written about myth and fairy tales. Lisa Mckenzie, a sociologist at the London School of Economics, who has explored portrayals of working class women Emma Dabiri, teaching fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, who has studied what people mean by the term 'mixed-race' in Britain today. Jane Cunningham, founder of advertising and marketing consultancy Pretty Little Head. The broadcast edition of this programme will be available on Iplayer soon after transmission. A longer version is available now as a podcast.

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Late Night Woman's Hour - Clothes

Author: BBC Radio 4
Fri, Apr 29, 2016


From the shock value of punk to Muslim modesty codes, via clothes as art and how police officers personalize their uniforms, Lauren Laverne and guests discuss what we wear and what it means. With punk pioneer Jordan, fashion designer Barjis Chohan, philosopher Shahidha Bari, and former police officer and blogger Ellie Bloggs Producer: Luke Mulhall.

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