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New York Times The Daily Podcast by Michael Barbaro

New York Times The Daily Podcast

by Michael Barbaro

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In this popular daily podcast from The New York Times, host Michael Barbaro covers a few of the top news stories of the day with interviews of journalists about these stories and audio clips of the news events spliced in. It's one of the best podcasts for catching up on the top news stories of the day from a newspaper that often drives the daily news cycle with their in-depth reporting. The podcast covers primarily politics, both globlal and domestic, along with major news stories that are unfolding in the United States. The podcast started in February of 2017 and you can go back through the whole archive of over 200 podcast episodes to listen to stories you are interested in. Learn about these eventful times with this top rated podcast from The New York Times.


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https://art19.com/shows/the-daily

  • Putting “Fake News” on Trial
    Thu, May 24, 2018


    The families of children killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in 2012 are suing a conspiracy theorist who claims the massacre was a hoax. Their lawsuits are bringing the issue of “fake news” to the courts. Guest: Elizabeth Williamson, a reporter in the Washington bureau of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • A Crossroads for the Democratic Party
    Wed, May 23, 2018


    In Georgia, two women were locked in a close race for the Democratic nomination for governor. What does this primary tell us about the future of the Democratic Party? Guest: Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Rod Rosenstein’s Impossible Choice
    Tue, May 22, 2018


    President Trump has asked the Justice Department to look into whether the F.B.I. infiltrated his campaign in 2016 for political purposes. In response, the department granted the president’s team access to highly classified information from the special counsel’s Russia investigation. What’s behind this decision? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • North Korea’s Fear? Becoming Libya
    Mon, May 21, 2018


    John R. Bolton, President Trump’s new national security adviser, has said that negotiations with North Korea should follow “the Libya model.” Now, North Korea is threatening to call off the planned summit meeting with Mr. Trump. What risks does the Libya model hold for Kim Jong-un? Guest: Mark Landler, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Daily Presents “Caliphate,” Chapter 5
    Sat, May 19, 2018


    The New York Times has introduced a documentary audio series that follows Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The Times, on her quest to understand ISIS. Today, as a special episode of “The Daily,” we offer Chapter 5 of “Caliphate,” in which an ISIS recruit carries out a killing — then questions everything.

    The next episode of “Caliphate” will publish in the series’s own feed next Thursday, May 24th, and as a bonus installment of “The Daily” next Saturday, May 26th. New York Times subscribers can listen to that episode now at nytimes.com/caliphate.

    This episode includes disturbing language and scenes of graphic violence.

  • Does Mueller Have a Plan for Trump?
    Fri, May 18, 2018


    White House lawyers have claimed that Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel overseeing the Russia investigation, will not indict the president, regardless of his findings. If that’s true, then what is the purpose of his inquiry? Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • A Child of Gaza Becomes a Political Symbol
    Thu, May 17, 2018


    The death of a Palestinian baby during the protests in Gaza became a rallying cry for critics of Israel. Within hours, the family’s story was being questioned. Guest: Declan Walsh, the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times, who has been reporting from Gaza. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • When Facebook Rumors Incite Real Violence
    Wed, May 16, 2018


    A series of damning posts on Facebook has stoked longstanding ethnic tensions in Sri Lanka, setting off a wave of violence largely directed at Muslims. How are false rumors on social media fueling real-world attacks? Guests: Max Fisher and Amanda Taub, who have reported on Sri Lanka for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Two Views of the U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem
    Tue, May 15, 2018


    Many Israelis see the relocation of the United States Embassy to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv as a historic milestone for the Jewish state. But for Palestinians, who hope to see the eastern part of Jerusalem as the capital of a Palestinian state, it’s a betrayal. Guests: David M. Halbfinger, the Jerusalem bureau chief of The New York Times, and Declan Walsh, The Times’s Cairo bureau chief, who has been reporting from Gaza this week. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Prospect of Peace With North Korea
    Mon, May 14, 2018


    The time and place for a historic meeting between the president of the United States and the leader of North Korea have been set. Does President Trump deserve credit for the diplomatic breakthrough on the Korean Peninsula? Guest: Nicholas Kristof, a New York Times columnist who writes about human rights and global affairs, and who has repeatedly traveled to North Korea for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Daily Presents “Caliphate,” Chapter 4
    Sat, May 12, 2018


    The New York Times has introduced a documentary audio series that follows Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The Times, on her quest to understand ISIS. Today, as a special episode of “The Daily,” we offer Chapter 4 of “Caliphate,” in which a new recruit proves his worth and gets invited to a secret meeting. To sign up for a weekly dispatch from Rukmini and find out about new episodes of “Caliphate,” visit nytimes.com/caliphate.

    This episode includes disturbing language and scenes of graphic violence.

  • A Life-or-Death Crisis for Black Mothers
    Fri, May 11, 2018


    Black mothers and infants in the United States are far more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than their white counterparts. The disparity is tied intrinsically to the lived experience of being a black woman in America. Guests: Linda Villarosa, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, and Simone Landrum, a young mother in New Orleans. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The C.I.A.’s Moral Reckoning
    Thu, May 10, 2018


    Gina Haspel, President Trump’s pick for C.I.A. director, faced the Senate Intelligence Committee for the first time on Wednesday as her confirmation hearings began. Lawmakers addressed her with an unusual line of questioning: What is your moral character? Guest: Matthew Rosenberg, who covers intelligence and national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Breakdown of the Iran Nuclear Deal
    Wed, May 09, 2018


    President Trump has withdrawn the United States from the Iran nuclear deal, calling it “decaying and rotten.” Why did President Barack Obama sign it in the first place? Guest: Mark Landler, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Gina Haspel and the Shadow of Torture
    Tue, May 08, 2018


    The Central Intelligence Agency is waging an unusual campaign to make Gina Haspel its next leader, despite her polarizing past. Why do officers see her most controversial quality as her greatest asset? Guests: Adam Goldman, a reporter who covers the intelligence community for The Times; John Bennett, a former chief of the C.I.A.’s clandestine service who retired in 2013. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Return of Rudy Giuliani
    Mon, May 07, 2018


    Since joining President Trump’s legal team, Rudolph W. Giuliani has repeatedly made attention-grabbing TV appearances in which he has antagonized Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel overseeing the Russia investigation. The strategy is reminiscent of one that Mr. Giuliani has used before — 30 years ago, as a prosecutor in New York City taking on the Mafia. Guest: Michael Winerip, who covered Mr. Giuliani’s rise as a Manhattan prosecutor in the 1980s for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Daily Presents “Caliphate,” Chapter 3
    Sat, May 05, 2018


    The New York Times has introduced a documentary audio series that follows Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The Times, on her quest to understand ISIS. Today, as a special episode of “The Daily,” we offer Chapter 3 of “Caliphate,” in which ISIS turns fantasy into reality for a new recruit. To sign up for a weekly dispatch from Rukmini and find out about new episodes of “Caliphate,” visit nytimes.com/caliphate.

    This episode includes disturbing language and scenes of graphic violence.

  • The Hunt for the Golden State Killer
    Fri, May 04, 2018


    An investigator was on the verge of retirement, having never completed his decades-long mission to catch the Golden State Killer. Then he had an idea: Upload DNA evidence to a genealogy website. Guest: Paul Holes, who helped to crack the case. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Sexual Harassment's Toll on Careers
    Thu, May 03, 2018


    In a case that highlights the economic consequences of sexual harassment and retaliation, Ashley Judd is suing Harvey Weinstein for the damage he did to her career after she rebuffed his advances. And in the second part of the episode, three women who pioneered the language of consent reflect on being far ahead of their time on the politics of sex. Guests: Jodi Kantor, an investigative reporter at The New York Times; Juliet Brown, Christelle Evans and Bethany Saltman, who helped to establish an affirmative consent policy for sex at Antioch College in 1990. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Taxi Driver's Plight
    Wed, May 02, 2018


    A New York City taxi driver, Nicanor Ochisor, took his own life in March. His family says he grew increasingly hopeless as ride-hailing services like Uber took over the industry. Mr. Ochisor’s suicide is one of several in recent months that have called attention to the economic straits of professional drivers. Guest: Nicolae Hent, who has been a taxi driver in New York City for three decades and was a friend of Mr. Ochisor. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Mueller’s Questions for Trump
    Tue, May 01, 2018


    The New York Times has obtained the list of questions that Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel looking into Russia’s election interference, wants to ask President Trump. The wide-ranging queries offer a rare view into an investigation that has been shrouded in secrecy. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the Russia investigation for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • A Family Divided by the Korean War
    Mon, Apr 30, 2018


    In a historic summit meeting, North and South Korea vowed to pursue a peace treaty to formally end the Korean War after more than 65 years. That could bring reunions for the thousands of families who have been separated since the war broke out. Guest: Sylvia Nam, whose grandfather went to North Korea just after the Korean War started and never returned. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Daily Presents “Caliphate,” Chapter 2
    Sat, Apr 28, 2018


    The New York Times has introduced a documentary audio series that follows Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The Times, on her quest to understand ISIS. Today, as a special episode of “The Daily,” we offer Chapter 2 of “Caliphate,” in which Rukmini speaks with a former ISIS member about how and why he joined the fold. To sign up for a weekly dispatch from Rukmini and find out about new episodes of “Caliphate,” visit nytimes.com/caliphate.

    This episode includes disturbing language and scenes of graphic violence.

  • The Cosby Verdict and #MeToo
    Fri, Apr 27, 2018


    Bill Cosby has been convicted of sexual assault following years of accusations from dozens of women. What changed between the first trial, which ended in a hung jury, and this one? Guests: Graham Bowley, an investigative reporter at The Times who has been covering the Cosby proceedings; Lili Bernard, a former guest star on “The Cosby Show” and one of more than 50 women who have spoken out against the entertainer. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Trump’s Travel Ban Goes to the Supreme Court
    Thu, Apr 26, 2018


    After being blocked for months by lower courts, President Trump’s executive orders that restricted travel from several predominantly Muslim nations have finally reached the Supreme Court. The justices seem focused on one question: Should the president’s authority have anything to do with his personal beliefs? Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • The Allegations Against Ronny Jackson
    Wed, Apr 25, 2018


    The nomination of Dr. Ronny L. Jackson, President Trump’s personal doctor, as the next head of Veterans Affairs has come to an abrupt stop. Now, Congress is beginning to examine several alarming allegations from unidentified whistle-blowers that derailed the doctor’s Senate confirmation process. Guest: Michael D. Shear, a White House correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Hong Kong's Missing Bookseller
    Tue, Apr 24, 2018


    When the owner of a thriving bookstore in Hong Kong disappeared in October 2015, questions swirled. What happened? And what did the Chinese government have to do with it? Guest: Alex W. Palmer, a Beijing-based writer who has reported on China for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • After a Suspected Chemical Attack, a Syrian Tells His Story
    Mon, Apr 23, 2018


    The United States says that the suspected chemical weapons attack on the rebel-held town of Douma, Syria, this month was part of a military push by President Bashar al-Assad’s government to break the will of the people still living there. One of them tells his story. Guest: Mahmoud Bwedany, who grew up in Douma and was there when Syrian forces attacked this month. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • James Comey Opens Up About Ego, Distrust and More
    Fri, Apr 20, 2018


    James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director, had an elaborate plan to make public his memos documenting his interactions with President Trump, in the hopes of prompting the appointment of a special counsel. In an interview, he explains his decision to take matters into his own hands. Guest: Mr. Comey. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Introducing “Caliphate,” a New York Times Audio Series
    Thu, Apr 19, 2018


    The New York Times has introduced a documentary audio series that follows Rukmini Callimachi, a foreign correspondent for The Times and a frequent voice on “The Daily,” as she reports on the Islamic State and the fall of the Iraqi city of Mosul. With the producer Andy Mills, Rukmini journeys to the heart of the conflict to grapple with the most pressing questions about ISIS and to comprehend the power and global pull of the militant group. Today, instead of our usual show, we offer the Prologue and Chapter 1 of “Caliphate.” To sign up for a weekly dispatch from Rukmini and find out about new episodes of “Caliphate,” visit nytimes.com/caliphate.

    This episode includes disturbing language and scenes of graphic violence.

  • Wednesday, Apr. 18, 2018
    Wed, Apr 18, 2018


    The firing of a professional cheerleader has drawn attention to an industry that seemed to be operating outside the #MeToo movement. But now, sports teams are being drawn into it. Guest: Annie Brown, a producer on “The Daily,” speaks with Bailey Davis, the New Orleans Saints cheerleader who was fired for violating the team’s social media policy. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, Apr. 17, 2018
    Tue, Apr 17, 2018


    For months, the federal investigation into possible links between the Trump campaign and Russia focused on Washington. Now, the inquiry has led back to New York, the president’s hometown, and to one man: Michael D. Cohen. Guest: Jim Rutenberg, who has been reporting on Mr. Cohen, President Trump’s longtime personal lawyer, for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, Apr. 16, 2018
    Mon, Apr 16, 2018


    A battle is brewing between the Environmental Protection Agency, which wants to weaken auto emissions standards, and the state of California. Separately, James Comey, the F.B.I. director fired by President Trump, went on national television to call the president “morally unfit.” Guest: Coral Davenport, who covers environmental policy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Apr. 13, 2018
    Fri, Apr 13, 2018


    Days after a suspected chemical attack killed dozens of Syrian civilians, President Trump promised retaliation. Now, Mr. Trump and his national security advisers are trying to decide how the United States should respond. Guest: Helene Cooper, a Pentagon correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Thursday, Apr. 12, 2018
    Thu, Apr 12, 2018


    Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, returned to Capitol Hill on Wednesday for a second day of hearings on the company’s mishandling of data. Unlike their Senate colleagues, House members came prepared with tough questions about privacy and the social media company’s practices — as well as a counternarrative to the story Mr. Zuckerberg and his team have carefully crafted. And calls for congressional oversight are growing. Guest: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Apr. 11, 2018
    Wed, Apr 11, 2018


    Mark Zuckerberg, the Facebook chief executive, began two days of marathon hearings in Washington, answering tough questions on the company’s mishandling of data. But the hours of testimony about the social media company’s practices seemed to focus on a larger, more difficult question: What is Facebook, exactly? Guest: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, Apr. 10, 2018
    Tue, Apr 10, 2018


    The F.B.I. has raided the home of President Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael D. Cohen — the same man who acknowledged paying $130,000 to a pornographic film actress who said she had a sexual encounter with Mr. Trump. What are investigators looking for? Guest: Matt Apuzzo, who covers law enforcement for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, Apr. 9, 2018
    Mon, Apr 09, 2018


    President Trump has warned that there will be a “big price to pay” after yet another suspected chemical weapons attack on Syrians. But the suspicion that the Assad regime continues to use those weapons suggests it views the United States as being focused on a different fight. Guest: Ben Hubbard, who covers the Middle East for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Apr. 6, 2018
    Fri, Apr 06, 2018


    On local TV stations across the United States, news anchors have been delivering the exact same message to their viewers. “Our greatest responsibility,” they begin by saying, “is to serve our communities.” But what they are being forced to say next has left many questioning whom those stations are really being asked to serve. Guests: Sydney Ember, a New York Times business reporter who covers print and digital media; Aaron Weiss, who worked several years ago as a news director for Sinclair in Sioux City, Iowa. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Thursday, Apr. 5, 2018
    Thu, Apr 05, 2018


    Many farmers across the Midwest voted for Donald J. Trump in the 2016 election but hoped he would never follow through on his threats to impose tariffs on China. They feared that they would suffer if China imposed its own tariffs as payback. Now, Beijing has done just that, proposing tariffs on 106 types of American goods — including soybeans, corn and pork — in retaliation for President Trump’s plans to penalize Chinese trade practices. Guest: Eldon Gould, a farmer in Illinois who voted for President Trump. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Wednesday, Apr. 4, 2018
    Wed, Apr 04, 2018


    It started with a report on Fox News, and ended with calls for United States troops at the border with Mexico. We look at how President Trump’s approach to immigration transformed over just 72 hours. Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Tuesday, Apr. 3, 2018
    Tue, Apr 03, 2018


    The Second Amendment is just 27 words long. But those 27 words are among the most cryptic and divisive in the United States Constitution — and they are at the heart of one of the most contentious debates in American politics. Why is the Supreme Court so reluctant to clarify them? Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Monday, Apr. 2, 2018
    Mon, Apr 02, 2018


    President Trump’s son-in-law wants to overhaul the prison system. The president’s attorney general bitterly opposes such a move. That has set the scene for a highly personal battle inside the White House. Guest: Matt Apuzzo, a New York Times reporter based in Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Friday, March 30, 2018
    Fri, Mar 30, 2018


    Behind the landmark Supreme Court ruling of Brown v. Board of Education was a girl named Linda Brown, whose story led to states being ordered to desegregate schools, mostly against their will. Ms. Brown died on Sunday. Who was she, and what has changed in the 64 years since the case was decided? Guest: Nikole Hannah-Jones, an investigative reporter covering race and civil rights for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Thursday, March 29, 2018
    Thu, Mar 29, 2018


    As the special counsel built his case against Michael T. Flynn and Paul Manafort, pressure was mounting for the men to to cooperate with the Russia inquiry. Then a lawyer for President Trump came to them with an idea: What if the president were to pardon his former advisers? Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the Russia investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, March 28, 2018
    Wed, Mar 28, 2018


    President Trump has chosen John R. Bolton to be his new national security adviser. In 2005, a Republican-controlled Senate committee refused to confirm Mr. Bolton as President George W. Bush’s ambassador to the United Nations. We look back at those confirmation hearings, which portrayed Mr. Bolton as a threat to national security. Guest: Elizabeth Williamson, who writes about Washington in the Trump era for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, March 27, 2018
    Tue, Mar 27, 2018


    Eight years ago, the United States and Russia agreed to a spy swap that sent a Russian double agent to safety in Britain. That former spy and his daughter were poisoned by a nerve agent this month, and the Kremlin has been  accused of orchestrating the attack. Why did it happen now? Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, March 26, 2018
    Mon, Mar 26, 2018


    As hundreds of thousand of demonstrators prepared to march in Washington in response to the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., students on the South Side of Chicago felt sympathy, but also frustration. Why hadn’t the gun violence in their community earned the nation’s outrage? Guest: Sameen Amin,  a senior video producer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, March 23, 2018
    Fri, Mar 23, 2018


    For decades, Americans have believed that the best way to end racial inequality is to end class inequality. But a landmark 30-year study is debunking that logic. Guests: Emily Badger, who writes about cities and urban policy for The Upshot; William O. Jawando, who worked in the Obama administration on My Brother’s Keeper, a mentoring initiative for black boys. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Thursday, March 22, 2018
    Thu, Mar 22, 2018


    Five days after details about Cambridge Analytica’s mining of data were made public, Mark Zuckerberg, the chief executive of Facebook, broke his silence on his company’s role in the data breach. Minutes after posting a statement on Facebook, he spoke with The New York Times. Guest: Kevin Roose, a business columnist for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Wednesday, Mar. 21, 2018
    Wed, Mar 21, 2018


    A young Canadian data expert came up with a plan to harvest people’s personal data from Facebook, and to use that information to influence their voting. How did the brains behind Cambridge Analytica become its whistle-blower? Guest: Matthew Rosenberg, a New York Times reporter in Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Tuesday, Mar. 20, 2018
    Tue, Mar 20, 2018


    President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, facing no real challenger, has been elected to a fourth term, drawing support from more than three-quarters of voters. How is the most powerful man in Russia staying that way? Guest: Steven Lee Myers, a former Moscow bureau chief of The New York Times who covered Mr. Putin’s rise to power and who is the author of “The New Tsar: The Rise and Reign of Vladimir Putin.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Monday, Mar. 19, 2018
    Mon, Mar 19, 2018


    President Trump called the firing of Andrew G. McCabe, the deputy F.B.I. director, a “great day for democracy.” Mr. McCabe says it’s further evidence of the president’s efforts to undermine the Russia investigation. What really happened? Guest: Matt Apuzzo, a New York Times reporter in Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

  • Friday, Mar. 16, 2018
    Fri, Mar 16, 2018


    Ida B. Wells was an investigative reporter who exposed the systematic lynching of black men in the South. Her work made her the most famous black woman in the country. But when she died in 1931, at the age of 68, The New York Times failed to write an obituary. Obituaries in The Times have been long dominated by white men. Now, the paper of record is trying to fix the record. Guests: Amisha Padnani, the digital editor on The Times’s obituaries desk and a leader of the Overlooked project; Caitlin Dickerson, a national reporter for The Times; Michelle Duster, a professor at Columbia College Chicago and a great-granddaughter of Ida B. Wells. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Thursday, Mar. 15, 2018
    Thu, Mar 15, 2018


    Florida is a great state to be a gun owner. For years, it has been a laboratory of sorts for the National Rifle Association — it’s the state that invented the concealed-carry permit. Gun control proponents had started to resign themselves to the fact that they might never pass any laws. Then came Parkland.

    Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Mar. 14, 2018
    Wed, Mar 14, 2018


    Rex Tillerson’s relationship with President Trump was rocky from the start. But no one was more surprised than Mr. Tillerson when he was fired as secretary of state on Tuesday. Mr. Tillerson was the most persistent advocate of opening diplomatic channels with North Korea, a position that put him publicly at odds with his boss. As Mr. Trump prepares to meet Kim Jong-un, the North’s leader, we talk to the man who came closest to a deal with Pyongyang about what the current administration can learn from previous attempts. Guests: Mark Landler, a White House correspondent for The New York Times; William Perry, a former secretary of defense and one of the few senior U.S. officials to have negotiated directly with the North Koreans. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, Mar. 13, 2018
    Tue, Mar 13, 2018


    With the prominent opposition leader Leopoldo L?pez under house arrest, Venezuela thought its loudest political prisoner had finally been silenced. But he refused to buckle, even facing the prospect of going back to prison. Here’s the second part of Mr. L?pez’s story. Guest: Wil S. Hylton, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, Mar. 12, 2018
    Mon, Mar 12, 2018


    With Venezuela in crisis, its most vocal opposition leader, Leopoldo L?pez, is under house arrest, unable to act. What happens if he does? Guest: Wil S. Hylton, a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Mar. 9, 2018
    Fri, Mar 09, 2018


    Hush money. Catch-and-kill deals. The threat of blackmail. An elaborate system has developed to silence women who level accusations against powerful men. One of those women is Stephanie Clifford, a pornographic actress who claims to have had an affair with Donald J. Trump.  Guest: Jim Rutenberg, The New York Times’s media columnist. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Thursday, Mar. 8, 2018
    Thu, Mar 08, 2018


    In announcing new protections on steel and aluminum imports, President Trump said he was acting in the interest of national security. But could the real threat be the tariffs themselves?  Guest: Peter S. Goodman, an economics correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Mar. 7, 2018
    Wed, Mar 07, 2018


    South Korea says that the North is willing to talk about giving up its atomic arsenal. What happened to the threat of nuclear war? Guest: Mark Landler, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, Mar. 6, 2018
    Tue, Mar 06, 2018


    The New York Times has a new five-part podcast series that tries to solve a real-life problem with a surprising story. So today, instead of or usual show, we offer “Change Agent,” hosted by Charles Duhigg, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of “The Power of Habit.”

  • Monday, Mar. 5, 2018
    Mon, Mar 05, 2018


    In the days since the shooting in Parkland, Fla., a group of teenagers has risen to national prominence for their activism and calls for gun control. But more than 3,000 students attend Stoneman Douglas High School. Six of them spoke to a New York Times reporter about the day their childhood ended. Guest: Jack Healy, a national correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Mar. 2, 2018
    Fri, Mar 02, 2018


    When we spoke with Representative Tom Rooney, a Florida Republican, in July, he said he was starting to feel defeated by the state of politics in Washington. Nine months later, we check back in, and he talks frankly about the Russia investigation, gun control and his decision not to run for re-election. Guest: Representative Tom Rooney, Republican of Florida. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Thursday, Mar. 1, 2018
    Thu, Mar 01, 2018


    President Trump stunned lawmakers on Wednesday with calls for gun control and jabs at the National Rifle Association. “They have great power over you people,” he said of the N.R.A. “They have less power over me.” Separately, Hope Hicks, the White House communications director who testified this week that her job required telling “white lies,” is to step down. Guests: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times; Michael D. Shear, a White House correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018
    Wed, Feb 28, 2018


    Republicans have campaigned on gun rights for years. But Democrats running for office have tended to avoid the issue. In the wake of the Florida school shooting, however, will gun control be a dominant topic in this year’s midterm elections? Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018
    Tue, Feb 27, 2018


    “All he cares about is his gun.”

    “He could be a school shooter in the making.”

    Those were among the concerns expressed in calls to law enforcement about Nikolas Cruz, who is suspected of shooting 17 people dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Yet so many red flags triggered no legal action. How is that possible? Guest: Richard A. Oppel Jr., a national correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, Feb. 26, 2018
    Mon, Feb 26, 2018


    At the Conservative Political Action Conference this weekend, one thing was clear: President Trump has taken over the conservative movement. His vision dominated, and, as one woman learned, there was little room for alternative views. Guest: Mona Charen, a conservative columnist who was booed while speaking on a panel at the conference. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Friday, Feb. 23, 2018
    Fri, Feb 23, 2018


    President Trump, conservatives and the National Rifle Association have once again tried to steer the national conversation after a mass shooting to the mental health of the people who pull the triggers, rather than the weapons they use. But how can the mental health system stop gun violence when mental illness is so rarely the cause of it?  Guest: Dr. Amy Barnhorst, the vice chairwoman of community psychiatry at the University of California, Davis. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018
    Thu, Feb 22, 2018


    The aftermath of a mass shooting has become a familiar cycle in the United States: One side demands change, the other works to block it. But this time, it is the students who survived the assault who are pressing lawmakers to impose new restrictions on guns. Guest: Michael D. Shear, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018
    Wed, Feb 21, 2018


    The indictment secured by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, makes it clear that the most powerful weapon in Russia’s campaign to disrupt the 2016 election was Facebook. We look at how Russia used social media to sow divisions in the United States. Guest: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018
    Tue, Feb 20, 2018


    In October, four American soldiers were ambushed by militants in a remote desert in Niger. What were they doing in Africa, and who were they fighting? It was all part of a shadowy war going back to the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.  Guests: Alan Blinder, a national reporter for The New York Times; Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism and the Islamic State for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Monday, Feb. 19, 2018
    Mon, Feb 19, 2018


    The Justice Department charged 13 Russians with illegally trying to disrupt the American political process, in a sophisticated plot to deepen the country’s divisions and turn Americans against one another. President Trump’s reaction to those charges suggests that plot is still working. Guest: Matt Apuzzo, a New York Times reporter based in Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Friday, Feb. 16, 2018
    Fri, Feb 16, 2018


    The AR-15 rifle used in the shooting that left at least 17 people dead at a high school in Parkland, Fla., was purchased legally, according to a federal law enforcement official. How did a semiautomatic weapon originally designed for warfare become easier to buy than a handgun? Guests: C. J. Chivers, a New York Times investigative reporter and Marine Corps veteran; Richard A. Oppel Jr., a Times reporter specializing in coverage of domestic terrorism and the military. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018
    Thu, Feb 15, 2018


    President Trump has called for an overhaul of immigration that replaces a family-based system with a merit-based one. But what counts as merit? We also report on the shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., in which at least 17 people died. It was the 18th school shooting in the United States this year. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, a national immigration reporter for The New York Times; Catherine Porter, Canada bureau chief for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018
    Wed, Feb 14, 2018


    As a candidate, Donald J. Trump was very critical of the size of the national debt. As president, he has proposed a budget that would add $7 trillion to the federal deficit over the next decade. Republicans are saying nothing. Guest: Jim Tankersley, who covers taxes and the economy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.


  • Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018
    Tue, Feb 13, 2018


    The House minority leader, Nancy Pelosi, took to the floor for eight hours last week to protest a spending bill that did not include protections for the young immigrants known as Dreamers. Now, she says she wanted the bill to pass. What’s the risk for the Democratic Party?Guest: Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, Feb. 12, 2018
    Mon, Feb 12, 2018


    At the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics, 169 plainly dressed athletes marched out in drab gray coats and bluejeans, competing not for a country but as “Olympic athletes from Russia.” What did Russia do at the last Winter Games to earn them that punishment? Guest: Rebecca R. Ruiz, an investigative reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Feb. 9, 2018
    Fri, Feb 09, 2018


    Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico with great fury, but the government there said that just 64 people had been killed by the storm. The hundreds of bodies showing up at morgues across the island told a different story.  Guests: Frances Robles, a New York Times correspondent based in Miami; Mili Bonilla, whose father died in Puerto Rico in October. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.



  • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018
    Thu, Feb 08, 2018


    Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico as a Category 4 storm on Sept. 20, flooding neighborhoods and villages and cutting power to 3.4 million people. More than four months later, much of the island is still in shock. A recent visit to a suicide prevention center shows the long-term toll on mental health in a place struck by the overwhelming impression that the rest of the world has moved on. Guest: Caitlin Dickerson, a national reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018
    Wed, Feb 07, 2018


    When Republicans handed out large tax cuts to corporations, most economists rejected lawmakers’ claims that the benefits would trickle down to working Americans. So why do many companies seem to be giving their employees more money?  Guests: Jim Tankersley, who covers taxes and the economy for The New York Times; Wes Carter, the president of Atlantic Packaging in Wilmington, N.C., who spoke to Sabrina Tavernise, a Times reporter. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018
    Tue, Feb 06, 2018


    The Republican push to release a classified memo has brought attention to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, and to the long battle to determine when national security concerns outweigh civil liberties. What has surprised many is the side Republicans chose this time. Guest: Charlie Savage, who covers national security and the law for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, Feb. 5, 2018
    Mon, Feb 05, 2018


    President Trump has claimed credit for a booming U.S. economy. But is it actually booming, and to what extent is he responsible? Guest: Peter S. Goodman, who writes about the economy for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Feb. 2, 2018
    Fri, Feb 02, 2018


    Almost from the moment that he was appointed to head the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt has been cast by environmentalists as an ideologue on a mission to destroy the very agency he runs. But Mr. Pruitt, who built a career suing to block environmental rules, sees it differently. Guests: Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency; Coral Davenport, who covers energy and environmental policy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018
    Thu, Feb 01, 2018


    Republicans insist that their push to release a secret memo that is said to question the conduct of the F.B.I. and the Justice Department in the early stages of the Russia investigation is not an attempt to undermine the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller. But whatever their intentions, the possible fallout from the memo’s release has everything to do with Mr. Mueller.  Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the Russia investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Jan. 31, 2018
    Wed, Jan 31, 2018


    In his first State of the Union address, President Trump left behind divisive rhetoric and called for one American family. But hidden in his many stories of everyday American heroes was a deeply nationalist message. Guest: Mark Landler, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018
    Tue, Jan 30, 2018


    The U.S. government announced this month that it would withhold hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Pakistan. In the weeks since, Afghanistan has experienced one of the most violent and deadly periods in its 16-year war. How are the two connected? Guest: Mujib Mashal, a New York Times correspondent in Afghanistan, who describes the sense of terror in Kabul. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, Jan. 29, 2018
    Mon, Jan 29, 2018


    As the Trump administration clamps down on immigration, some asylum seekers are fleeing to Canada. But is it the promised land they had hoped for? Guest: Dan Bilefsky, a New York Times reporter in Canada. Thank you to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for their interviews with migrants crossing the border. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Jan. 26, 2018
    Fri, Jan 26, 2018


    The New York Times is reporting that President Trump tried to order the firing of Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel overseeing the Russia investigation, but ultimately backed down when his own lawyer threatened to quit. And Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, talks about trying to hammer out a compromise on immigration policy. He has described dealing with the White House as “like negotiating with Jell-O.”  Guests: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security for The Times; Senator Chuck Schumer of New York. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018
    Thu, Jan 25, 2018


    Dr. Lawrence G. Nassar was lauded as the go-to doctor for the United States’ best gymnasts. After he pleaded guilty to multiple sex crimes, Judge Rosemarie Aquilina cleared her docket to give each of his accusers a chance to speak at the sentencing hearing. More than 150 women, including several Olympians, confronted Dr. Nassar in the courtroom and spoke of their abuse over seven days. It was an extraordinary use of the courtroom — and a new way of thinking about justice.  Guests: Emily Bazelon, who covers legal issues for The New York Times Magazine; Makayla Thrush, a former gymnast, spoke to Sabrina Tavernise, a Times reporter. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018
    Wed, Jan 24, 2018


    Tonya Harding had talent, but the world of figure skating wanted nothing to do with her. She was called “white trash.” And when Nancy Kerrigan was bashed in the knee just before the 1994 Winter Olympics, Ms. Harding became a villain. Now, 24 years later, her narrative is being revisited — and she is back in the spotlight. Guest: Taffy Brodesser-Akner, who interviewed Tonya Harding (now Tonya Price) for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday,Jan. 23, 2018
    Tue, Jan 23, 2018


    President Trump’s plan to build a “big, beautiful wall” between the United States and Mexico has become the ultimate symbol of a hard-line immigration policy. So why, as Congress voted to end a government shutdown and take up the issue of immigration, have Democrats suggested that they would agree to fund the wall if Republicans protect the Dreamers?

    Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Monday, Jan. 22, 2018
    Mon, Jan 22, 2018


    Democrats forced the federal government to shut down by saying there could be no budget deal without a deal on the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. Republicans have refused to end the shutdown by saying there can be no DACA deal without a budget deal. There’s been a lot of finger-pointing between the two parties, and the future of young undocumented immigrants hangs in the balance. Guest: Thomas Kaplan, a New York Times reporter who covers Congress. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Jan. 19, 2018
    Fri, Jan 19, 2018


    The only Democrat in the room when President Trump railed against African immigrants as coming from “shithole countries” tells his side of the story. The ensuing fight over immigration has put the government on the verge of a shutdown. If that happens, whose fault would it be? Guests: Senator Richard Durbin of Illinois, who spoke to Carl Hulse, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times, about the meetings with President Trump; Jonathan Weisman, the deputy Washington editor for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018
    Thu, Jan 18, 2018


    America’s addiction crisis has become a lucrative business, and fortunes have been made in the growing rehab industry. But the death of a patient in California has raised questions about how to treat people who want to get clean, and what it means to profit from the health crisis. Guest: Michael Corkery, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018
    Wed, Jan 17, 2018


    A Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on border walls turned into a fight over the language President Trump used to describe Haiti and some African countries. Why does it matter so much to members of Congress? Also, Stephen Bannon is the first member of Mr. Trump’s inner circle to receive a grand jury subpoena in the Russia investigation. Guests: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, a White House correspondent for The New York Times; Michael S. Schmidt, an investigative reporter for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018
    Tue, Jan 16, 2018


    As South Korea prepares to host the Winter Olympics, it has been eager to get the North to participate. What is Seoul afraid will happen if it won’t? And, for 38 minutes on Saturday morning, people in Hawaii believed that a missile was headed for the state. Guest: Susan Chira, a Times journalist who covered Asia in the 1980s, when South Korea hosted the Olympic Games for the first time; voice mail messages from people who received a false alert about an incoming missile attack in Hawaii. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Friday, Jan. 12, 2018
    Fri, Jan 12, 2018


    President Trump has demanded to know why the United States should welcome immigrants from “shithole countries.” His words have alarmed lawmakers and threatened an immigration deal. But they have also raised a question about a certain American ideal: Who should be let in? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers the White House for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018
    Thu, Jan 11, 2018


    When President Trump announced that he would end the Obama-era program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, he gave Congress six months to make it law. Otherwise, many undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children could be deported. As the clock counts down, why is the president making the program his problem once again?

    Guest: Michael D. Shear, a White House correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

  • Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018
    Wed, Jan 10, 2018


    George Papadopoulos drew worldwide attention when he was identified as the low-ranking foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign who got in over his head with Russia and inadvertently set off the Mueller investigation. But another foreign policy adviser, Carter Page, also drew the attention of the F.B.I.: Why did his story end so differently? Guest: Jason Zengerle, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

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