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This Author: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
This Publisher: American Rhetoric

Harvard University Commencement Address by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Harvard University Commencement Address

A World Split Apart

by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

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Here is a free speech that is not to be missed. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (Russian author of The Gulag Archipelago) delivered the Harvard University Commencement Address in 1978. While in exile from the Soviet Union, he spent a number of years in the United States and this address is his analysis of the Western predicament.


In this comprehensive one hour speech he discusses Western politics, the media, our role in Vietnam, the lack of courage in leadership, Soviet communism, commercialism and materialism, and the spiritual state of Western man. Most of Solzhenitsyn's criticisms still hold true today. He delivers the speech in Russian and it is simultaneously translated into English.


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The translation of the Speech
Reviewer Ladymaggic
 August 06, 2008
The words are wonderful...and it is great hearing his voice reading the speech, and the translation is very good once you get into the pattern of understanding it.

There is a transcript that helps too..

It is a wonderful speech.
Thank you

Harvard University Commencement Address "A World Split Apart"
Reviewer kmwakak8
 January 03, 2008
by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

I found this speech quite eloquent and insightful, even before the time that we would be in a state of enhanced crisis and calamity,
we have continued in a cycle of self destructive leadership and
power plays. The Grand Chessboard has come full circle. In 1978 he spoke of Vietnam, today we have not evolved far from the self absorbed society that maintains living according to destructive means.
His reference to the Declaration of Independence is fitting for the time he gave this speech, and even more so today

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  • Published: 1978
  • LearnOutLoud.com Product ID: H016986
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