Go Advanced Search
 

Get this free title from:




Learn More About
Find More Titles by
This Author: John F. Kennedy
This Narrator: John F. Kennedy
This Publisher: American Rhetoric

John F. Kennedy: Inaugural Address by John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy: Inaugural Address

by John F. Kennedy

Product Details

Narrator
Publisher
 
Audio Original
Running Time
14 Min.
User Rating
  5.0  Stars Based on 6 ratings
Share This

Description

"We observe today not a victory of party, but a celebration of freedom -- symbolizing an end, as well as a beginning -- signifying renewal, as well as change. For I have sworn before you and Almighty God the same solemn oath our forebears prescribed nearly a century and three-quarters ago.

The world is very different now. For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe -- the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state, but from the hand of God."

-John F. Kennedy

This speech delivered January 20, 1961.


People Who Liked John F. Kennedy: Inaugural Address Also Liked These Free Titles:
  Address to the Nation on Vietnam
by Richard M. Nixon

  World War II Audio: 1938-December 6, 1941
by Franklin D. Roosevelt

Reviews & Ratings
User Reviews         Rate this title  

"Ask not what your country can do for you..."
Reviewer girijad83
 February 17, 2006
John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address, given on January 20, 1961 at Capitol Hill, is published by American Rhetoric. Kennedy, the youngest President in the history of the United States, begins his address by calling the day not a victory of the Democratic party, but a 'celebration of freedom', symbolizing an end, a renewal and a change henceforth. Kennedy pledges to support the cause of liberty at any cost, be it by supporting a friend or opposing an enemy.

At the end of his speech, he calls upon his fellow Americans to have pride in and work for their country with the famous phrase: "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." This inaugural address marks an important time of turmoil, hope and renewal in American history. I recommend this audio piece to everyone for its historical significance, and give it 5 stars.

More Details

  • LearnOutLoud.com Product ID: J007297
Available On
Volumes
ISBN-10
ISBN-13
Download