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Philosophy Bites Podcast by David Edmonds

Philosophy Bites Podcast

by David Edmonds

Product Details

Running Time
15 Min.
Offered
Weekly
User Rating
  5.0  Stars Based on 4 ratings
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Description

David Edmonds (co-author of Wittgenstein's Poker) and Nigel Warburton (author of Philosophy: The Basics) interview top philosophers on a wide range of topics in this weekly podcast.


People Who Liked Philosophy Bites Podcast Also Liked These Podcasts:
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User Reviews         Rate this title  

I love it!
Reviewer raveash
 May 23, 2011
I love this podcast. Every time i tune it to listen I feel that i'm am growing as a person. Please continue with the hard work! Thanks!

Podcast Episodes




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 Podcast Website:
http://nigelwarburton.typepad.com/philosophy_bites/

  • Larry Temkin on Obligations to the Needy
    Mon, Apr 02, 2018


    How can we best help other people? Peter Singer has argued that we should give aid. Despite a lifetime spent believing this, Larry Temkin has started to question whether the effects of aid are beneficial. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he discusses some qualms about Peter Singer's arguments. 

  • Sarah Fine on the Right to Exclude
    Wed, Feb 14, 2018


    Do states have a moral right to exclude people from their territory? It might seem obvious that states do have such a right, but Sarah Fine questions this in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

    This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examining Ethics on iTunes or listen to episodes at ExaminingEthics.Org

  • Eric Schwitzgebel on Scepticism
    Thu, Jan 11, 2018


    How do I know I'm not dreaming? This sort of question has puzzled philosophers for thousands of years. Eric Schwitzgebel discusses scepticism and its history with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examining Ethics on iTunes or listen to episodes at ExaminingEthics.Org

     

  • Philip Pettit on Robustly Demanding Goods
    Sun, Dec 10, 2017


    What is a robustly demanding good, and what has that got to do with friendship and love? Find out in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast in which Nigel Warburton interviews Princeton Professor Philip Pettit about this topic. 

     

  • Katalin Farkas on Knowing a Person
    Mon, Nov 06, 2017


    Philosophers talk about 'knowing how' and 'knowing what'. But what is involved in knowing a person? Katalin Farkas discusses this question with David Edmonds in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    This episode was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University.

  • Roger Scruton on Human Nature
    Tue, Aug 29, 2017


    Are human beings fundamentally different from the rest of the animal world? Can what we essentially are be captured in a biological or evolutionary description? Roger Scruton discusses the nature of human nature with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Anil Seth on the Real Problem of Consciousness
    Wed, Jul 19, 2017


    The Hard Problem of consciousness is the difficulty of reconciling experience with materialism. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, in conversation with Nigel Warburton, Anil Seth, a neuroscientist, explains his alternative approach to consciousness,which he labels the 'Real Problem. Anil is a Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow

  • Michael Puett on Ritual in Chinese Philosophy
    Mon, Jun 26, 2017


    Why does apparently trivial ritual play such an important part in some ancient Chinese philosophy? Michael Puett, co-author of The Path, explains in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

    This episode of Philosophy Bites was sponsored by the Examining Ethics podcast from the Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University. You can subscribe to Examining Ethics on iTunes or listen to episodes at ExaminingEthics.Org

  • Aaron Meskin on the Definition of Art
    Tue, May 30, 2017


    What is Art? That's not an easy question to answer. Some philosophers even think it can't be answered. Aaron Meskin discusses this question on this episode of Aesthetics Bites. Aesthetics Bites is a podcast series of interviews with top thinkers in the philosophy of art. It is a collaboration between the London Aesthetics Forum and Philosophy Bites and is made possible by a grant from the British Society of Aesthetics.

  • Shelly Kagan on Death and Deprivation
    Tue, Apr 18, 2017


    The process of dying can be horrible for many, but is there anything bad about death itself? The obvious answer is that deprives us of something that we might otherwise have experienced. But that leads to further philosophical issues...Shelly Kagan discusses some of these with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Elisabeth Schellekens Dammann on Disagreement About Taste
    Tue, Apr 18, 2017


    We certainly disagree about aesthetic judgments in a range of cases. But is anyone right? Is there  no disputing about taste? Are all tastes equal? Elisabeth Schellekens Damman discusses disagreement about taste in this episode of Aesthetics Bites. 

    Aesthetics Bites is a podcast series of interviews with top thinkers in the philosophy of art. It is a collaboration betwen the London Aesthetics Forum and Philosophy Bites and is made possible by a grant from the British Society of Aesthetics.

  • Andy Clark on The Extended Mind
    Sat, Mar 18, 2017


    Andy Clark, who with David Chalmers proposed the theory of the extended mind, explains what he means by this idea in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Stephen Davies on Art and Evolution
    Wed, Mar 01, 2017


    Why do we have art at all? There must be some evolutionary explanation. In this episode of the Aesthetics Bites podcast series, Stephen Davies discusses some of the evolutionary theories about where art came from in conversation with Nigel Warburton. 

    Aesthetics Bites is a podcast series of interviews with top thinkers in the philosophy of art. It is a collaboration between the London Aesthetics Forum and Philosophy Bites and is made possible by a grant from the British Society of Aesthetics .

  • Eileen John on Art and Morality
    Wed, Mar 01, 2017


    In this episode of  Aesthetics Bites, Eileen John discusses some of the ways that art explores moral questions. Nigel Warburton is the interviewer.

    Aesthetics Bites is a  series of interviews with top thinkers in the philosophy of art. It is a collaboration between the London Aesthetics Forum and Philosophy Bites and is made possible by a grant from the British Society of Aesthetics.

     

  • Chris Frith on The Point of Consciousness
    Fri, Feb 03, 2017


    Why do we have consciousness at all? Neuroscientist Chris Frith discusses this question with Nigel Warburton in this episode of Mind Bites which is part of a series made in association with Philosophy Bites for Nick Shea's AHRC-funded Meaning for the Brain and Meaning for the Person project. 

  • Keith Frankish on Conscious Thought
    Sat, Jan 14, 2017


    One distinctive feature of human beings is that we can represent aspects of the world to ourselves, and also counterfactual situations. We do this through our conscious thoughts. Keith Frankish discusses this phenomenon in this episode of Mind Bites, which was made as part of Nicholas Shea's ASHRC-funded Meaning for the Brain and Meaning for the Person project.

  • Amia Srinivasan on What is a Woman?
    Sun, Jan 01, 2017


    'What is a woman?' may seem a straightforward question, but it isn't. Feminist philosophers from Simone de Beauvoir onwards have had a great deal to say on this topic. Amia Srinivasan gives a lucid introduction to some of the key positions in this debate in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. She is talking to Nigel Warburton.

  • Kate Jeffery on Concepts and Representation
    Mon, Dec 05, 2016


    Neuroscientist Kate Jeffery discusses how the brain represents the world. This episode is is part of a short series Mind Bites made in association with Nicholas Shea's AHRC-funded Meaning for the Brain and Meaning for the Person project. That website is open for comments and discussion of the topic of this podcast.

  • Anthony Gottlieb on Pierre Bayle
    Fri, Dec 02, 2016


    Pierre Bayle was one of the best-known philosophers in the Eighteenth Century, but his work is now rarely studied. Anthony Gottlieb, author of The Dream of Enlightenment, argues that he should be better known, particularly his work on toleration and on scepticism. 

  • Kathleen Stock on Fiction and the Emotions
    Sat, Nov 12, 2016


    How should we understand the emotions that readers feel about fictional characters? Kathleen Stock discusses this question with Nigel Warburton in this, the second episode of Aesthetics Bites, a collaboration between the London Aesthetics Forum and Philosophy Bites, made possibly by a grant from the British Society of Aesthetics.

  • David Miller on Immigration
    Sat, Nov 12, 2016


    Immigration is one of the major, and most contentious, political issues of our day. Can philosophy help here? David Miller thinks so. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he speaks to David Edmonds about border controls and their justification. 

  • Sophie Scott on the Meaning of Laughter
    Tue, Oct 11, 2016


    What is laughter? What roles does it serve? Sophie Scott, a neuroscientist, discusses this serious question with Nigel Warburton for this episode of Mind Bites, a series made in association with Philosophy Bites as part of Nicholas Shea's AHRC-funded Meaning for the Brain and Meaning for the Person project 

  • Peter Godfrey-Smith on Mental Representations
    Mon, Oct 03, 2016


    Do we map the world in our minds? Does that imply that we have a little inner map-reader in our heads interpreting mental representations? Peter Godfrey-Smith discusses these issues with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. This episode is is part of a short series Mind Bites made in association with Nicholas Shea's AHRC-funded Meaning for the Brain and Meaning for the Person project.

  • Noel Carroll on Criticism
    Sun, Oct 02, 2016


    Noel Carroll argues that evaluation is a central element of criticism of art, drama, dance, music, and literature.  Nigel Warburton is the interviewer for this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. This is the first of a series of 6 interviews on Aesthetics, made in association with the London Aesthetics Forum and made possible by a grant from the British Society of Aesthetics.

  • Cecile Fabre on Remembrance
    Tue, Sep 20, 2016


    How should we remember and commemorate those who die in war? What about the enemy dead? Cecile Fabre discusses this issue with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Jesse Prinz on Thinking with Pictures
    Mon, Aug 01, 2016


    Many philosophers deny the common sense view that we think with pictures. Are they right to do so? Jesse Prinz doesn't think so. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he explains to Nigel Warburton why we need to think again about thinking with pictures. This episode is part of the series Mind Bites, made in association with Nicholas Shea's AHRC-sponsored Meaning for the Brain and Meaning for the Person project. 

  • Kieran Setiya on the Mid-Life Crisis
    Wed, Jul 06, 2016


    The mid-life crisis is a well-observed phenomenon. Is there a philosophical angle on this? MIT philosopher Kieran Setiya thinks there is. He discusses it in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

  • Catherine Wilson on Epicureanism
    Mon, May 30, 2016


    Epicureanism has been caricatured as a philosophy of indulgence. But what did followers of the Ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus really believe? Catherine Wilson discusses Epicureanism with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Gregg Caruso on Freewill and Punishment
    Tue, Apr 26, 2016


    If determinism is true, can there be anyjustification for punishment? Gregg Caruso discusses this issueon PhilosophyBites.

  • Greg Currie on the Philosophy of Film
    Sat, Mar 26, 2016


    This episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast focuses on several questions about representation and perception in the philosophy of film. Nigel Warburton talks to Greg Currie

  • Katherine Morris on Merleau-Ponty on the Body
    Wed, Mar 02, 2016


    Maurice Merleau-Ponty was one of the most interesting of the French phenomenological thinkers, but his reputation has been eclipsed by those of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. Katherine Morris discusses some of Merleau-Ponty's ideas about the body in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Michael Devitt on Experimental Semantics
    Sun, Feb 14, 2016


    Does the word 'G?del' straightforwardly refer to the person who came up with the incompleteness theory of arithmetic? Some think the best way to find out to ask people about their intuitions on the topic? This creates all kinds of problems, as Michael Devitt explains in conversation with Nigel Warburton.

  • Steven Hyman on Categorising Mental Disorders
    Fri, Jan 29, 2016


    Steven E. Hyman discusses the philosophical issues that arise from attempting to categorise mental disorders with David Edmonds in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Leif Wenar on Trade and Tyranny
    Sun, Jan 10, 2016


    Where does our oil come from? Does it matter? Leif Wenar, author of the recent book Blood Oil, argues that Western democracies are compromising themselves by buying either directly or indirectly from vicious tyrants. 

  • Katrin Flikschuh on Philosophy in Africa
    Wed, Dec 16, 2015


    In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Katrin Flikschuh addresses the question 'What sort of philosophy is going on in Africa?'

  • Carlo Rovelli on Philosophy and Physics
    Sun, Nov 29, 2015


    Some eminent physicists, including Stephen Hawking, have been sceptical of the value of philosophy to physics. Carlo Rovelli, a theoretical physicist with a strong interest in philosophy, disagrees. Here he discusses the relationship between philosophy and physics with Nigel Warburton.

  • John Worrall on Evidence-Based Medicine
    Tue, Nov 17, 2015


    What sort of conclusions can we legitimately draw from the experiments that support evidence-based medicine? John Worrall questions some of the received opinion on this topic in this interview with David Edmonds for Philosophy Bites

  • Joshua Greene on the Construction of Thought
    Sat, Oct 31, 2015


    We take for granted the fact that we can combine concepts to give new thoughts, and understand the thoughts too. How do we do that? Joshua D. Greene discusses this question in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Graham Priest on Buddhism and Philosophy
    Tue, Oct 13, 2015


    What is the nature of the self? What is reality? How should we live? These are fundamental philosophical questions. Graham Priest discusses how such questions have been discussed in the Buddhist tradition for this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Jesse Prinz on Is Everything Socially Constructed?
    Sun, Sep 27, 2015


    To what degree is reality something created by us? Jesse Prinz explores this fascinating question in conversation with Nigel Warburton

  • Massimo Pigliucci on the Demarcation Problem
    Sun, Sep 13, 2015


    How can you tell science from non-science? Karl Popper argued that the falsifiability of a hypothesis is the mark of science. Massimo Pigliucci is not so sure about that. 

     

     

  • David Owens on Duty
    Tue, Sep 01, 2015


    What is a duty and what sort of obligation does it put us on? David Owens explores the nature of duty in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. If you enjoy Philosophy Bites, please consider supporting us via Patreon.

  • Kimberley Brownlee on Social Deprivation
    Wed, Aug 19, 2015


    We are a highly social species: we need human contact. But do we have a right to it? In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Kimberley Brownlee suggests that this is an ingredient in a minimally decent human life...

  • Shelly Kagan on Speciesism
    Sat, Aug 01, 2015


    The philosopher Peter Singer is famous for his attack on speciesism, the alleged prejudice that many exhibit in favour of human interests when compared with the interests of other animals. Here Shelly Kagan outlines Singer's position and takes issue with it. In the process he makes some interesting points about prejudices in general.



  • Susan James on Foucault and Knowledge
    Wed, Jul 22, 2015


    Michel Foucault's work explores a wide range of topics; it includes histories of both punishment and sex. He also wrote more abstractly about philosophical topics. One theme to which he kept returning, whatever the topic, was the nature of our knowledge. Susan James discusses this thread in his work in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Larry Temkin on Transitivity
    Mon, Jul 06, 2015


    How do you choose which course of action is best? It seems reasonable that if A is better than B, and B is better than C, A must be better than C. But is it? Larry Temkin challenges this idea, known as the axiom of transitivity.

  • William B. Irvine on Living Stoically
    Sun, Jun 21, 2015


    How should we live? is a basic philosophical question. The Stoics had some answers. But are they relevant today? William B. Irvine thinks so. Listen to his conversation with Nigel Warburton on this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Steven Lukes on Power
    Sat, Jun 06, 2015


    What is power? Steven Lukes argues for a three-dimensional account of this concept in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Theodore Zeldin on Philosophy and History
    Sat, Jun 06, 2015


    The historian and writer Theodore Zeldin gives his personal take on the relation betwen philosophy and history in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

  • Jesse Prinz on Art and Emotion
    Fri, May 22, 2015


    What part do emotions play in our appreciation of art? Jesse Prinz explores the sense of wonder at artworks in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Cassim Quassam on Conspiracy Theories
    Sun, May 10, 2015


    What is a conspiracy? Why do conspiracies - real or imagined -  matter to philsophy? Cassim Quaassam explores these questions in conversation with Nigel Warburton

  • Tim Williamson on the Appeal of Relativism
    Tue, Apr 28, 2015


    Are all truths relative? That's an attractive idea for many people. Tim Williamson, Wykeham Professor of Logic at Oxford University discusses why and attempts to immunise us against sloppy thinking in this area.

  • Shaun Nichols on Death and the Self
    Tue, Apr 14, 2015


    How does your view of the self affect your attitude to your own death? Shaun Nichols discusses this question in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Rebecca Roache on Swearing
    Sun, Mar 29, 2015


    Warning: this episode on the philosophy of swearing includes swearing. Rebecca Roache discusses swearing and whether there are good arguments for refraining from it. 

  • Lisa Bortolotti on Irrationality
    Thu, Mar 19, 2015


    We're all irrational some of the time, probably more of the time than we are ready to acknowledge.  Lisa Bortolotti discusses the nature of irrationality with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

  • Jonathan Webber on Deceiving With Words
    Sun, Mar 01, 2015


    There are many ways to deceive with words, some of which don't involve lying. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Jonathan Webber considers whether it matters or not if you lie. 

  • Simon Critchley on Suicide
    Mon, Feb 16, 2015


    Albert Camus described suicide as the 'one really serious philosophical problem'. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Simon Critchley discusses suicide with Nigel Warburton.

  • Christine Korsgaard on the Status of Animals
    Tue, Feb 03, 2015


    Many philosophers argue in favour of the welfare of animals because of their capacity for feeling pain. Harvard philosopher Christine Korsgaard is unusual in using Kantian arguments to defend the status of animals as ends in themselves. She discusses her approach with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Meira Levinson on the Aims of Education
    Sun, Jan 18, 2015


    What are the aims of education? Meira Levinson discusses this important question with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosoph Bites podcast.

  • Lucy Allais on Forgiveness
    Sun, Jan 04, 2015


    What is forgiveness? Whom does it benefit? Is it ever obligatory? Lucy Allais discusses these questions in conversation with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Who is the most impressive philosopher you've met? A compilation.
    Sat, Dec 20, 2014


    We've collected a range of answers to the question 'Who's the most impressive philosopher you've met?' This includes the late Ronald Dworkin's response along with many others. Some of the answers are expected, but quite a few are suprising. 

  • Julia Annas on What is Virtue Ethics For?
    Sat, Dec 20, 2014


    Julia Annas explains what Virtue Ethics is for and how it differs from other approaches to the question of how we should live in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

  • Hugh Mellor on Probability
    Sun, Dec 07, 2014


    What is probability? Not an easy question to answer. We thought our best chance of clarity on this question was from Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at Cambridge University and author of a book on the subject, Hugh Mellor...

  • Rebecca Newberger Goldstein on Progress in Philosophy
    Thu, Nov 13, 2014


    In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Nigel Warburton interviews the philosopher and novelist Rebecca Newberger Goldstein about whether Philosophy has made any progress since the time of Plato. If you enjoy Philosophy Bites, please support us on Patreon or via the Paypal links on our blog.

  • Adam Swift on Parental Partiality
    Mon, Oct 27, 2014


    Most people think it is acceptable to advantage their children, but how far should this go? Adam Swift discusses the limits of parental partiality in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Keith Frankish on the Hard Problem and the Illusion of Qualia
    Sat, Oct 11, 2014


    Keith Frankish discusses consciousness, subjective experience and the brain in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Ted Honderich on What It Is to be Conscious
    Sat, Oct 11, 2014


    In this episode Ted Honderich sketches his theory of the nature of consciousness. 

  • John Dupre on Genomics
    Mon, Sep 29, 2014


    Genomics is a new approach to understanding our biology, one with far-reaching consequences for our understanding of what we are and where are responsibilities lie. Philosopher of biology John Dupre explains in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Peter Lamarque on Literature and Truth
    Sun, Sep 14, 2014


    Many people have claimed that one of the benefits of reading writers like Dostoevsky and Shakespeare is that they convey important truths about the human condition. Peter Lamarque is sceptical about this way of speaking about literature. He explains why in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Jennifer Nagel on Intuitions about Knoweldge
    Sun, Aug 31, 2014


    Knowledge is part of our everyday lives. We know all kinds of things without even thinking about them. But what is going on here? Jennifer Nagel discusses our intutions about knowledge with Nigel Warburton for this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast

  • Tamar Gendler on Why Philosophers Use Examples
    Sun, Aug 17, 2014


    Why do philosophers use examples? Tamar Gendler explores this question in conversation with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Amia Srinivasan on Genealogy
    Sat, Aug 02, 2014


    Does it matter where our ideas came from? Friedrich Nietzsche famously diagnosed the origin of Christian morality in what he thought of as a slave mentality. Amia Srninivasan discusses genealogical reasoning with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Seth Lazar on Sparing Civilians in War
    Sat, Jul 19, 2014


    Why is it morally wrong to target civilians in war? Can civilians be distinguished clearly from combatants? Seth Lazar discusses these issues in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Chris Betram on Rousseau's Moral Psychology
    Sun, Jul 06, 2014


    Jean-Jacques Rousseau's insights into moral psychology and its impact on how we live are the subject of this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Roger Scruton on the Sacred
    Tue, Jun 24, 2014


    Is there any place for a notion of the sacred in contemporary life? Roger Scruton believes that there is. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he discusses his understanding of the sacred and the part it plays in our experience of each other.

  • Regina Rini on the Moral Self and Psychology
    Sun, Jun 08, 2014


    What can experimental psychology contribute to our self-development as moral agents? Philosopher Regina Rini explores this question in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Simon Blackburn on Narcissism
    Sat, May 24, 2014


    Vanity, smugness, narcissism - they're not good, but they're not all the same thing. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Simon Blackburn explores what's wrong with narcissism and how it differs from related concepts.

  • Norman Daniels on the Philosophy of Healthcare
    Tue, May 13, 2014


    Should we be striving to reduce health inequalities? If so, how? Harvard philosopher Norman Daniels discusses this question in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Tom Stoneham on George Berkeley's Immaterialism
    Sun, Apr 27, 2014


    George Berkeley was famous for arguing that objects are really just ideas. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Tom Stoneham clarifies what he meant by this. 

  • Michael Ignatieff on Political Theory and Political Practice
    Sat, Apr 12, 2014


    Michael Ignatieff was an academic with a keen inerest in political theory before he learnt the hard way about politics in practice. He was an academic who became leader of the opposition in Canada then lost heavily in the 2011 Prime Ministerial election. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast he discusses the relationship between theory and practice in politics with Nigel Warburton.

  • Stephen Darwall on Moral Accountability
    Sun, Mar 30, 2014


    Moral accountability is at the heart of moral obligation and it reveals much about the attitudes we hold to each otehr. Yale professor Stephen Darwall explains what this means in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • David Papineau on Philosophy and Sport
    Thu, Mar 13, 2014


    David Papineau discusses a range of specific sporting incidents that are of philosophical interest in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. David Papineau has a weblog on philosophy and sport: 'More Important Than That'

  • Roberto Mangabeira Unger on Deep Freedom
    Tue, Mar 04, 2014


    Roberto Unger argues that contemporary political progressives have abandoned what 19th century liberals knew: that some ways of living are better than others. In this conversation with Nigel Warburton he argues that we need a different concept of freedom, one that will allow humans to thrive.

  • Nicola Lacey on H.L.A.Hart and Legal Positivism
    Mon, Feb 24, 2014


    H.L.A. Hart made significant contributions to legal philosophy. Nicola Lacey discusses his legal positivism in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

  • John Skorupski on Normativity
    Sun, Feb 09, 2014


    Some statements are descriptive, such as 'Philosophy Bites is a podcast series'; others are normative, such as 'You ought to tell the truth'. But what exactly is normativity? John Skorupski explores this question in conversation with David Edmonds.

  • Tim Scanlon on What's Wrong with Inequality?
    Sat, Jan 25, 2014


    Is a concern for inequality of wealth just a form of envy? Are there good reasons for objecting to inequality? Harvard philosopher Tim Scanlon discusses these questions in converation with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Emma Borg on Language and Context
    Tue, Jan 07, 2014


    How much of the meaning of what we say depends on its context of utterance? Is there a role for literal meaning. Emma Borg discusses these questions with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. 

  • Patricia Churchland on Self Control
    Sun, Dec 22, 2013


    Neurophilosopher Pat Churchland discusses the insights that neuroscience can give us into the nature of self control in this episode of the Philosophyh Bites podcast. 

  • Jennifer Saul on Implicit Bias
    Sat, Dec 07, 2013


    Implicit biases are tricky. We all have them, apparently, but we don't realise we have them. What are the implications of these biases? Does it, perhaps, go some way to explaining why there are so few women in academic philosophy? Jennifer Saul discusses these questions with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Adrian Moore on Bernard Williams on Ethics
    Sat, Nov 23, 2013


    Bernard Williams was one of the most brilliant philosophers of his generation. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Adrian Moore discusses his ideas about Ethics.  

  • Rom Harre on the Linguistic Turn in Philosophy
    Sun, Nov 10, 2013


    For this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Rom Harre discusses and illustrates the so-called Linguistic Turn in Philosophy, the focus on actual uses of language that was advocated by the later Wittgenstein, J.L. Austin, Gilbert Ryle and others. 

  • Robert Talisse on the Importance of Arguments in Politics
    Sat, Oct 26, 2013


    Why is argument so important in politics? Bob Talisse, co-author of Why We Argue (and how we should), explores this issue in conversation with David Edmonds for this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • John Tasioulas on Human Rights
    Sat, Oct 12, 2013


    What are human rights? Are they simply legal rights? What is their relation to morality? John Tasioulas discusses the basis of human rights in conversation with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Eric Schwitzgebel on the Ethical Behaviour of Ethics Professors
    Sat, Sep 28, 2013


    You might expect people who specialize in moral philosophy to behave better than other people. Eric Schwitzgebel has done some empirical investigation of whether this is the case, and it doesn't seem to be. What does that show about ethics? Philosophy Bites investigates.

  • Alison Gopnik on Hume and Buddhism
    Sat, Sep 14, 2013


    Many people have noticed similarities between what David Hume wrote about the self and Buddhist teaching on this subject. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites archive Alison Gopnik discusses the possibility that there was a direct route of influence.

  • David Edmonds on Trolley Problems
    Sun, Sep 01, 2013


    Is it ever morally acceptable to kill one person to save many? Most people agree that in some extreme circumstances this, though psychologically difficult, can be the right action to take. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast, Nigel Warburton interviews David Edmonds (co-creator of the Philosophy Bites podcast) about the life and death thought experiments known as Trolley Problems. David Edmonds book about  Trolley Problems Would You Kill the Fat Man? will be published in Autumn 2013 by Princeton University Press.

  • Jessica Moss on Weakness of Will
    Sat, Aug 17, 2013


    You think you know what's best but don't do it. We've all been there. For Plato and Aristotle this weakness of will presented a philosophical problem. Jessica Moss explains their contrasting approaches to this topic in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

  • Michael Martin on Hume on Taste
    Sat, Aug 03, 2013


    David Hume's 'Of the Standard of Taste' focuses on judgements about beauty in writing. Can we say with any authority that one writer or work is better than another? Michael Martin gives a clear analysis of Hume's essay on this topic in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. Reliable texts of Hume's works are available from www.davidhume.org

  • Samuel Scheffler on the Afterlife
    Sat, Jul 20, 2013


    What do we really care about? In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Samuel Scheffler suggests that most of us care a lot about what happens after our deaths, and that affects what we feel about what is happening now and how we value it. 

  • Noel Carroll on Humour and Morality
    Sat, Jul 06, 2013


    Must humour be moral? What about jokes that rely on immoral attitudes?  Can they be funny? Are humour and morality simply separate spheres. Noel Carroll explores the relationship between humour and morality in this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast.

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