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This Author: Indre Viskontas

Inquiring Minds Podcast by Indre Viskontas

Inquiring Minds Podcast

by Indre Viskontas

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Listen to the Inquiring Minds Podcast featuring thought leaders on a wide variety of topics. Indre Viskontas & Kishore Hari make great hosts as they start off the podcast discussing some recent news or studies they found fascinating. Then they interview their guest and they explore "the place where science, politics, and society collide". Hear from Stephen Dubner on Freakonomics, Adam Rogers on the science of booze, Traci Mann giving unconventional findings on the science of weight loss, Dr. Norman Doidge on brain plasticity, and many other leading thinkers such as Adam Savage, William Gibson, Steven Johnson, Steven Pinker, Naomi Klein, Al Gore, John Oliver, Jared Diamond, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael Pollan, and many more. This series has over 90 podcast episodes and they're all on the feed. It's an excellent podcast that will introduce you to a wide variety of subjects.


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  • Up To Date | Night Owl Death, Space Launches, and Viagra’s Greater Purpose
    Fri, Apr 20, 2018


    This week: new research shows being a night owl might mean you’re at a greater risk of dying early, multiple interesting space launches are happening, and there’s new research into using phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors like Viagra and Cialis to help other drugs do their job better.

  • Creating Empathy With Immersive Virtual Reality
    Mon, Apr 16, 2018


    We talk to the founding director of Stanford University's Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Jeremy Bailenson. Bailenson’s lab studies how virtual reality can affect empathy—how it makes you feel to virtually embody someone else. VR offers the ability to be in someone else’s shoes in a way that you can’t recreate in real life—and those immersive experiences, whether it be facing a day in the life of a person experiencing homelessness, or diving to the corals that are right now being bleached by climate change, have lingering effects on all of us.

  • Up-To-Date | Does It Fart?: The Definitive Field Guide to Animal Flatulence
    Fri, Apr 13, 2018


    Kishore talks to Nick Caruso and Dani Rabaiotti, authors of Does It Fart?: The Definitive Field Guide to Animal Flatulence.

  • The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics
    Mon, Apr 09, 2018


    We talk to astrophysicist Adam Becker about his new book What Is Real? The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics.

  • Up-To-Date | James Webb, Shrimp, and Chilled-Out Monkeys
    Sat, Apr 07, 2018


    We're introducing a new, additional weekly episode! Every Friday, listen to Indre and Kishore do a quick recap of some of the week's most interesting science news.

    Today, we talk about why shrimp and lobster fishing might be worse for the environment than you think, the ongoing troubles with the James Webb Space Telescope, and a study that sort of shows monkeys who go to the spa are more relaxed.

  • The Neuroscience of How We Think
    Mon, Apr 02, 2018


    We have a big announcement! After 220 episodes, we are striking out on our own. Thanks to Mother Jones for being our home for the past 5 years. Look for new segments and episodes as we expand creatively, while still bringing you in depth conversations with scientists.

    This week, we talk to neuroscientist Daniel Krawczyk about his book Reasoning: The Neuroscience of How We Think.

    Dan also studies traumatic brain injury in veterans, using virtual reality as a part of cognitive behavioral therapy. 


  • Jellyfish Science
    Tue, Mar 27, 2018


    We talk to ocean scientist and science writer Juli Berwald about her new book Spineless: The Science of Jellyfish and the Art of Growing a Backbone.

  • The Politics of Rainforests
    Tue, Mar 20, 2018


    We talk to Rhett Butler, editor-in-chief and CEO of Mongabay, a nonprofit organization which seeks to raise interest in and appreciation of wild lands and wildlife, while examining the impact of emerging trends in climate, technology, economics, and finance on conservation and development.

  • What We Really Know About Gun Violence
    Tue, Mar 13, 2018


    We talk to Stanford law professor and economist John Donohue who for the better part of the last 20 years has been doing research into understanding gun violence.

  • 100% Renewable Energy by 2050
    Tue, Mar 06, 2018


    We talk to Stanford professor of civil and environmental engineering Mark Jacobson about his research that shows it’s possible for the world to be using 100% clean, renewable energy by 2050.

  • The Broad Potential of Psychoactive Drugs
    Tue, Feb 27, 2018


    We talk to journalist and science writer Hamilton Morris about his Viceland docuseries “Hamilton's Pharmacopeia” and the history and science of psychoactive drugs.

  • The Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance
    Mon, Feb 19, 2018


    We talk to Alex Hutchinson, author of Endure: Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance.

  • It's Time to Rethink Ocean Conservation
    Tue, Feb 06, 2018


    We talk to marine biologist, policy expert, and conservation strategist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson about why we need to rethink ocean conservation.

  • Science Got Women Wrong
    Tue, Jan 23, 2018


    We talk to science journalist and author Angela Saini about her latest book Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong and the New Research That's Rewriting the Story.

  • A Volcano Scientist Runs for Congress
    Tue, Jan 16, 2018


    We talk to Jess Phoenix, a volcanologist, geologist, and 2018 Democratic candidate seeking election to California's 25th Congressional District.

  • Mapping Human Brains
    Tue, Jan 09, 2018


    We talk to neuroscientist Lucina Uddin about her work mapping human brains.

  • Losing Genes but Gaining Music | [BONUS EP] Cadence | S02 Episode 01
    Mon, Jan 01, 2018


    Happy new year! It’s a bonus podcast: episode one of the second season of Indre’s other podcast, Cadence. 

    Subscribe to Cadence here:

    iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cadence/id1207136496 

    RSS: http://feeds.feedburner.com/cadence-podcast

    This season, we’re going to focus on music as medicine—telling the stories of people whose lives have been immeasurably improved with music. In this episode, we talk about William’s Syndrome, a genetic condition that causes heart problems, intellectual disabilities and a profound love of music. We hear from 31-year-old Benjamin Monkaba, who has the condition, his mother Terry, and Jennifer Latson, author of The Boy Who Loved Too Much, a book about William's Syndrome.


  • How One Emotion Connects Altruists and Psychopaths
    Mon, Dec 25, 2017


    We talk to professor of psychology & neuroscience Abigail Marsh about her new book The Fear Factor: How One Emotion Connects Altruists, Psychopaths, and Everyone In-Between.

  • Lessons in Investigating Death
    Tue, Dec 19, 2017


    We talk to Ken Holmes, who worked in the Marin County Coroner’s Office for thirty-six years, starting as a death investigator and ending as the three-term, elected coroner. A new book, The Education of a Coroner: Lessons in Investigating Death, chronicles his life spent studying death.

  • Lost Einsteins: Left Behind by the Innovation Economy
    Tue, Dec 12, 2017


    We talk to celebrated Stanford economist Raj Chetty about his work focusing on using empirical evidence—often big data—to inform the design of more effective governmental policies.

  • Getting Politicians to Talk About Science
    Tue, Dec 05, 2017


    We talk to Sheril Kirshenbaum, executive director of Science Debate (sciencedebate.org), a nonpartisan organization that asks candidates, elected officials, the public and the media to focus more on science policy issues of vital importance to modern life.

  • Black Hole Blues
    Tue, Nov 28, 2017


    We talk to theoretical astrophysicist Janna Levin about her book Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space.

  • Why Dinosaurs Matter
    Tue, Nov 21, 2017


    We talk to paleontologist, professor, expeditioner, and science communicator Ken Lacovara about his recent book Why Dinosaurs Matter.

  • What's Going on in the Brain of a Fetus?
    Tue, Nov 14, 2017


    We talk to pediatric neuroscientist Moriah Thomason about her research into what we can learn by imaging the brains of fetuses before they're born.

  • How Science Built One of the Greatest Basketball Teams in History
    Tue, Nov 07, 2017


    We talk to sports writer Erik Malinowski about his new book Betaball: How Silicon Valley and Science Built One of the Greatest Basketball Teams in History.

  • A Paid Climate Change Skeptic Switches Sides
    Mon, Oct 30, 2017


    In a joint production with Stevie Lepp and the Reckonings podcast we hear from Jerry Taylor, a former professional climate change skeptic who switched sides entirely.

  • Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything
    Tue, Oct 24, 2017


    We talk to cartoonist and author Zach Weinersmith about his latest book, Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything, co-written with his wife, parasitologist Kelly Weinersmith.

  • A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump
    Tue, Oct 17, 2017


    We talk to renowned psychiatrist Allen Frances about his latest book Twilight of American Sanity: A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump.

  • Molecules From Caesar's Last Breath Are Inside You
    Tue, Oct 03, 2017


    We talk to science writer Sam Kean about his latest book Caesar's Last Breath: Decoding the Secrets of the Air Around Us.

  • Where the Animals Go: Tracking Wildlife with Technology
    Wed, Sep 27, 2017


    We talk to Oliver Uberti and James Cheshire, authors of the new book Where the Animals Go: Tracking Wildlife with Technology in 50 Maps and Graphics.

  • Why Buddhism is True
    Mon, Sep 18, 2017


    We talk to journalist, scholar, and prize-winning author Robert Wright about his latest book Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment.

  • The Psychology of Hate
    Tue, Sep 12, 2017


    We talk to clinical psychologist Ali Mattu about the psychology of dehumanization and hate.

  • Jonathan Lynn on Why US Healthcare Is Worthy of Ridicule
    Thu, Aug 31, 2017


    We talk to award winning writer and director Jonathan Lynn about his latest novel, Samaritans, which is a satirical look at the US healthcare system. His films as director include Clue, Nuns on the Run (both of which he wrote), My Cousin Vinny, The Distinguished Gentleman and The Whole Nine Yards.

  • The Great American Solar Eclipse
    Tue, Aug 15, 2017


    We talk to astronomer Andrew Fraknoi about the upcoming total solar eclipse—the first total solar eclipse over North America in decades—on August 21st, 2017, and how you can best enjoy it.

  • The Science of Game of Thrones
    Mon, Aug 07, 2017


    We talk to English comedian and writer Helen Keen about her new book The Science of Game of Thrones: A myth-busting, mind-blowing, jaw-dropping and fun-filled expedition through the world of Game of Thrones.

  • Why Are We Curious?
    Mon, Jul 31, 2017


    We talk to acclaimed astrophysicist Mario Livio about his new book Why?: What Makes Us Curious.

  • We've Got to Start Eating Insects
    Mon, Jul 24, 2017


    We talk to entomologist Brian Fisher about his his research on ants in Mozambique and his new initiative to get entomologists more directly involved in conservation—a big part of which involves edible insects.

  • 186 Jason Silva - Origins: The Journey of Humankind
    Mon, Jul 17, 2017


    We talk to Jason Silva, host of National Geographic Channel’s new show Origins: The Journey of Humankind.

  • 185 Jennifer Latson - A True Story of Pathological Friendliness
    Mon, Jul 03, 2017


    We talk to journalist Jennifer Latson about Williams syndrome and her new book The Boy Who Loved Too Much: A True Story of Pathological Friendliness.

  • 184 Zeynep Tufekci - Twitter and Tear Gas
    Mon, Jun 26, 2017


    We talk to Zeynep Tufekci, writer and associate professor at the University of North Carolina School of Information and Library Science, about her book Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest.

  • 183 Dean Buonomano - The Neuroscience and Physics of Time
    Mon, Jun 19, 2017


    We talk to neuroscientist Dean Buonomano about his new book “Your Brain Is a Time Machine: The Neuroscience and Physics of Time.”

  • 182 Ty Tashiro - The Science of Being Awkward
    Tue, Jun 06, 2017


    We talk to psychologist Ty Tashiro about his new book “Awkward: The Science of Why We're Socially Awkward & Why That's Awesome.”

  • 181 Mike Drucker - How to Write Science Into Comedy
    Mon, May 29, 2017


    We talk to Mike Drucker, co-head writer for Bill Nye Saves the World, writer for Adam Ruins Everything, the Tonight Show, and much more about incorporating science into comedy writing.

  • 180 The Unique Challenge of Being a Woman in Engineering [Collaboration with Cited]
    Mon, May 22, 2017


    In this second and final special collaborative episode with the Cited podcast, Indre and guest host Alexander B. Kim focus on women in engineering and the obstacles they face throughout their careers.

  • 179 The Leaky Pipeline of Women in Science [Collaboration with Cited]
    Mon, May 15, 2017


    In this special collaborative episode with the Cited podcast, Indre and guest host Alexander B. Kim look into the “leaky pipeline” of women in science. There are many stages you go through from early school to a career in science and there are points along the way at which women seem to disproportionately slip out of that pipeline. This week we talk to researchers trying to learn more about why that happens and what we can do about it.

  • 178 Teresa Zimmers - The Murky Science of Lethal Injection
    Tue, May 09, 2017


    We talk to associate professor of surgery at Indiana University Teresa Zimmers about her work on whether or not lethal injection drugs actually provide a humane, painless death as promised.

  • 177 Bill Nye - Let’s Change the World
    Fri, May 05, 2017


    We talk to Bill Nye about his approach to communicating climate change and what he hopes will change in the future.

  • 176 Paul Doherty - The Actual Science Behind Outlandish Deaths
    Tue, Apr 25, 2017


    We talk to Paul Doherty, senior staff scientist at San Francisco’s famed Exploratorium Museum about his new book “And Then You're Dead: What Really Happens If You Get Swallowed by a Whale, Are Shot from a Cannon, or Go Barreling over Niagara.”

  • 175 Sharon Begley - Can't Just Stop: An Investigation of Compulsions
    Mon, Apr 17, 2017


    We talk to science writer Sharon Begley about her new book “Can't Just Stop: An Investigation of Compulsions.”

  • 174 James Beacham - The Exciting World of Particle Hunters
    Mon, Apr 10, 2017


    We talk to James Beacham, particle physicist with the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN about what it’s like to hunt for strange new subatomic particles.

  • [BONUS EP] Cadence | Episode 01: What Is Music?
    Tue, Apr 04, 2017


    It's the first episode of Indre's new podcast, Cadence! (Don’t worry, she’s not leaving Inquiring Minds.) Cadence is a podcast about music and how it affects your mind.What is music? How would you define it? Does it defy definition? In this episode we try to get answers to those questions from from a pioneer in music cognition research, a musicologist, and an otolaryngologist who surgically restores hearing and studies the brain basis of musical improvisation.If you like this first episode and want to hear more, subscribe to Cadence here:iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cadence/id1207136496RSS: http://feeds.feedburner.com/cadence-podcast

  • 173 Mary Roach - Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal
    Tue, Apr 04, 2017


    We talk to science writer Mary Roach about the science of your guts and her book “Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal.”

  • 172 Dan Ariely - The Surprising Science of What Motivates Us
    Mon, Mar 27, 2017


    We talk to Dan Ariely, the James B Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University about what actually motivates us to get things done—to finish that novel, to stick to a diet, or even to want to get up and go to work every day.

  • 171 Siddhartha Roy - The Science Behind the Flint Water Crisis
    Mon, Mar 20, 2017


    We talk to Siddhartha Roy, a PhD student and graduate researcher in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech. Roy is a founding member of the Virginia Tech Flint Water Study and has worked on the ground in Flint applying his research on corrosion and plumbing to the crisis.

  • 170 Steven Hatch - Inferno: A Doctor's Ebola Story
    Mon, Mar 13, 2017


    We talk to Dr. Steven Hatch, a specialist in infectious diseases and immunology about his latest book “Inferno: A Doctor's Ebola Story,” an account of his time in Liberia during the height of the ebola epidemic in 2014.

  • 169 Daniel Levitin - The Emerging Epidemic of the Silent Home
    Mon, Mar 06, 2017


    We talk to neuroscientist, music producer, and best-selling author Daniel Levitin about his recent research into how playing music in the home affects us.

  • 168 Alison Van Eenennaam - Gene Editing Livestock
    Mon, Feb 27, 2017


    We talk to researcher in Animal Genomics and Biotechnology at UC Davis Alison Van Eenennaam about the science of gene editing livestock.

  • 167 Haider Warraich - Modern Death: How Medicine Changed the End of Life
    Mon, Feb 20, 2017


    We talk to physician, writer, and clinical researcher Haider Warraich about his most recent book "Modern Death: How Medicine Changed the End of Life."

  • 166 Alan Burdick - Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation
    Mon, Feb 13, 2017


    We talk to Alan Burdick, staff writer and former senior editor for The New Yorker, about his most recent book "Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation.”

  • 165 Nate Allen - Why Science Is Huge on Reddit
    Mon, Feb 06, 2017


    We talk to Nate Allen, chemist and head moderator of one of the internet’s largest science communities: Reddit’s r/science subreddit.

  • 164 Alexandra Wolfe - Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story
    Mon, Jan 23, 2017


    We talk to author and Wall Street Journal reporter Alexandra Wolfe about her new book Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story.

  • 163 Dave Levitan - The Return Of "I'm Not a Scientist”
    Mon, Jan 16, 2017


    This week, as we near the inauguration of Donald Trump, we revisit a conversation with science journalist Dave Levitan about his book Not a Scientist: How Politicians Mistake, Misrepresent, and Utterly Mangle Science.

  • 162 Paul Bloom - Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion
    Mon, Jan 09, 2017


    We welcome back cognitive scientist Paul Bloom to talk about his new book Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion.

  • 161 Patrick Wolff - How to Become a Grandmaster Chess Champion
    Fri, Dec 23, 2016


    We talk to American chess Grandmaster Patrick Wolff.

  • 160 Helen Czerski - The Little Bits of Physics in Everyday Life
    Fri, Dec 16, 2016


    We talk to physicist and oceanographer Helen Czerski about her new book Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life.

  • 159 David Grinspoon - Earth in Human Hands: Shaping Our Planet's Future
    Fri, Dec 09, 2016


    We talk to astrobiologist David Grinspoon about his latest book Earth in Human Hands: Shaping Our Planet's Future.

  • 158 Lee van der Voo - The Fish Market: Inside the Big-Money Battle for the Ocean and Your Dinner Plate
    Fri, Dec 02, 2016


    We talk to investigative journalist Lee van der Voo about her new book The Fish Market: Inside the Big-Money Battle for the Ocean and Your Dinner Plate.

  • 157 Erik Vance - The Curious Science of Your Brain's Ability to Deceive, Transform, and Heal
    Fri, Nov 25, 2016


    We talk to science writer Erik Vance about his new book Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain's Ability to Deceive, Transform, and Heal.

  • 156 Heather Hill - Taking a Second Look at SeaWorld
    Fri, Nov 18, 2016


    We talk to marine biologist and marine mammal specialist Heather Hill about her work on marine mammal training and why it might disagree with much of what we covered in episode #146 with John Hargrove.

  • 155 Chris and Evan Hadfield - An Astronaut Explores the Arctic
    Sat, Nov 12, 2016


    We talk to Canadian astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield and his son Evan Hadfield about their recent exploration into the Arctic and Greenland on the legendary icebreaker, Kapitan Khlebnikov.

  • 154 Changing Political Minds - The Deep Story With Arlie Hochschild and Reckonings
    Fri, Nov 04, 2016


    We team up with Stephanie Lepp from the Reckonings podcast and talk to sociologist Arlie Hochschild about whether or not this election is causing more people than usual to change their minds about politics. We then hear from two voters who did in fact make some kind of transformation during this election season—one young voter who was voting in his second presidential election and one long-time voter and political insider who has been voting for 40 years.

  • 153 Merlin Tuttle - The Secret Lives of Bats
    Fri, Oct 28, 2016


    We talk to ecologist, conservationist and wildlife photographer Merlin Tuttle about his book The Secret Lives of Bats: My Adventures with the World's Most Misunderstood Mammals.

  • 152 Abigail Tucker - How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World
    Sat, Oct 22, 2016


    We talk to science writer Abigail Tucker about her new book The Lion in the Living Room: How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World.

  • 151 Irva Hertz-Picciotto - Should We Worry More About Toxic Environmental Chemicals?
    Fri, Oct 14, 2016


    We talk to Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Professor at the University of California Davis MIND Institute, Director of the NIH-funded UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center, and co-founder of Project TENDR, a collaborative effort of scientists, clinicians, policy-makers and advocates that aims to decrease the incidence of neurodevelopmental disorders by reducing neurotoxicant exposures that contribute to them.

  • 150 Stuart Firestein - Why Science Needs to Fail
    Fri, Sep 30, 2016


    We talk to Stuart Firestein, chair of the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, about his latest book Failure: Why Science Is So Successful.

  • 149 Sarah Ballard / Jackie Speier - The Appalling Reality of Harassment in Science
    Fri, Sep 23, 2016


    We talk to exoplanetary astronomer Sarah Ballard and congresswoman Jackie Speier about sexual harassment within the scientific community.

  • 148 Judith Schwartz - Hope for a Thirsty World
    Fri, Sep 16, 2016


    We talk to science journalist Judith Schwartz about her new book Water in Plain Sight: Hope for a Thirsty World.

  • 147 Dave Levitan - How Politicians Mangle Science
    Fri, Sep 09, 2016


    We talk to science journalist Dave Levitan about his new book Not a Scientist: How Politicians Mistake, Misrepresent, and Utterly Mangle Science.

  • 146 John Hargrove - Taking on SeaWorld
    Fri, Aug 26, 2016


    We talk to former Senior killer-whale trainer for SeaWorld and supervisor of Killer Whale Training for Marineland in the South of France about his book Beneath the Surface: Killer Whales, SeaWorld, and the Truth Beyond Blackfish.

  • 145 Carin Bondar - Wild Sex
    Fri, Aug 19, 2016


    We talk to biologist Carin Bondar about her new book Wild Sex: The Science Behind Mating in the Animal Kingdom.

  • 144 Ed Yong - I Contain Multitudes
    Fri, Aug 12, 2016


    We talk to award-winning British science writer Ed Yong about his recent book I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life.

  • 143 The Stories That Collection Museums Hold
    Mon, Aug 08, 2016


    We talk about the significance of collection museums with Emily Grasile, Chief Curiosity Correspondent at the Field Museum; Shannon Bennett, Chief of Science at the California Academy of Sciences; and Jack Dumbacher, chairman and curator of the California Academy of Science’s Department of Ornithology and Mammalogy.

  • 142 Hank Greely - The End of Sex
    Fri, Jul 22, 2016


    We talk to Hank Greely, director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences at Stanford University’s School of Medicine about his new book The End of Sex and the Future of Human Reproduction.

  • 141 Marek Glezerman - The Science of Gender Medicine
    Fri, Jul 15, 2016


    We talk to Marek Glezerman, professor emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology and currently chairman of the Ethics Committee at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University about his book Gender Medicine: The Groundbreaking New Science of Gender- and Sex-Based Diagnosis and Treatment.

  • 140 Janna Levin - This Is the Sound of Two Black Holes Colliding
    Fri, Jul 08, 2016


    We talk to Janna Levin, professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard College and author of Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space.

  • 139 Peter Willcox - Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet
    Fri, Jul 01, 2016


    We talk to Peter Willcox, Captain for Greenpeace for over 30 years and author of Greenpeace Captain: My Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet.

  • 138 Mary Roach - The Curious Science of Humans at War
    Fri, Jun 24, 2016


    We welcome best-selling science writer Mary Roach back on the show to talk about her latest book Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.

  • 137 Jonah Berger - The Hidden Forces That Shape Behavior
    Fri, Jun 17, 2016


    We talk to professor of marketing and New York Times bestselling author Jonah Berger about his latest book Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces That Shape Behavior.

  • 136 Siddhartha Mukherjee - An Intimate History of the Gene
    Fri, Jun 10, 2016


    We talk to cancer physician and researcher Siddhartha Mukherjee about his latest book The Gene: An Intimate History.

  • 135 Sean Carroll - Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself
    Fri, Jun 03, 2016


    We talk to theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his latest book The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself.

  • 134 Anders Ericsson - How to Do Everything Better
    Fri, May 20, 2016


    Does it take 10,000 hours to become an expert at something? Probably not, says our guest this week—who happens to be the author of the paper which was the basis for Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hour rule in the first place.We talk to psychologist Anders Ericsson about his new book Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise.

  • 133 Ben Beard - How Global Warming Is Making Some Diseases Even Scarier
    Fri, May 13, 2016


    We talk to Ben Beard, associate director for climate change and chief of the bacterial diseases branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

  • 132 Hope Jahren - The Joy and Otherness of Trees
    Fri, May 06, 2016


    This week we talk to geobiologist Hope Jahren about her recent book Lab Girl.

  • 131 Josh Willis - Greenland Is Melting!
    Fri, Apr 29, 2016


    Evidence is mounting that Greenland is melting at a faster and faster rate. We talked to Josh Willis—senior scientist at NASA JPL’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project—about how changing water temperatures in our oceans are affecting the Greenland ice sheet.

  • 130 Bill Nye - Fighting Climate Denial
    Fri, Apr 22, 2016


    We talk to Bill Nye about climate change denial and what we can do to fight it.

  • 129 Greg Marcus - Understanding Heart Disease With Big Data
    Fri, Apr 15, 2016


    We talk to Dr. Greg Marcus, the Director of Clinical Research for the UCSF Division of Cardiology about heart disease and how things like smart watches might help us learn more about it.

  • 128 Sy Montgomery - The Soul of an Octopus
    Fri, Apr 08, 2016


    We talk to naturalist and author Sy Montgomery about her latest book The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness.

  • 127 Carl Zimmer - The Mysterious World of Viruses
    Fri, Apr 01, 2016


    We talk to science writer and New York Times columnist Carl Zimmer about viruses. Viral fragments make up 8% of our entire genome—how much do we actually know about them?

  • 126 Maria Konnikova - The Science of Why We Fall for Cons
    Fri, Mar 25, 2016


    We talk to Maria Konnikova about her new book The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It . . . Every Time.

  • 125 Anthony James - How Deadly Are Mosquitoes?
    Fri, Mar 11, 2016


    We talk to Anthony James, distinguished professor of molecular biology and biochemistry at UC Irvine about the most deadly animal to human beings: the mosquito.

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