Go Advanced Search
 

Subscribe to this:

Podcast
Podcast




Podcasts in These Categories
Find More Titles by
This Author: Terry Gross
This Publisher: National Public Radio

NPR: Fresh Air Podcast by Terry Gross

NPR: Fresh Air Podcast

by Terry Gross

Product Details

Share This

Description

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.


People Who Liked NPR: Fresh Air Podcast Also Liked These Podcasts:
  NPR: Snap Judgment Podcast
by Glynn Washington

  Diary of a Cartoonist Podcast
by Scott Johnson

Reviews & Ratings
User Reviews         Rate this title  

Podcast Episodes




If this Podcast isn't working, please let us know by emailing us and we will try to fix it ASAP:

Podcast Feed URL:

 Podcast Website:
http://freshair.npr.org?ft=2&f=13

  • Who Is The Mystery Man Behind @realDonaldTrump?
    Thu, Apr 19, 2018


    'New York Times' journalist Robert Draper says "no one understands Trump's base" better than White House social media director (and former golf caddie) Dan Scavino. Draper tells Terry Gross about how Scavino edits many of the president's tweets and also about his possible ties to Russia. TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new seasons of HBO's 'Westworld' and Hulu's 'The Handmaid's Tale.'

  • 'Atlanta' Actor Brian Tyree Henry
    Wed, Apr 18, 2018


    Henry plays Alfred Miles, a.k.a. rapper "Paper Boi," on the Emmy Award-winning FX series 'Atlanta.' He talks about authenticity, studying at Yale School of Drama, and his eclectic music taste. Also, we remember former First Lady Barbara Bush, who died Tuesday at 92. She spoke with Terry Gross in 1994 about meeting her husband George, losing a child, and overcoming depression.

  • James Comey
    Tue, Apr 17, 2018


    The former FBI director tells Terry Gross that he wants to sound the alarm about the "forest fire" of the Trump presidency — and also to defend the FBI against charges of partisanship. "People love the FBI when they think it's on their side," Comey says. "We were not — and are not — on anybody's side." Comey talks about being fired by President Trump, hiding from the president in a curtain, and the origin of his now-famous use of the word "lordy." His new memoir is 'A Higher Loyalty.'

  • Lawrence Wright: 'The Future Is Texas'
    Mon, Apr 16, 2018


    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright predicts that the largest "red" state in the union will eventually move into the "blue" column — and change the nation's politics in the process. His new book about culture, politics and economy of the Lone Star state is 'God Save Texas.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the latest episode of the FX series 'Legion.'

  • Best Of: 'The Rider' / How Rodgers & Hammerstein Revolutionized Broadway
    Fri, Apr 13, 2018


    Following a rodeo accident, Brady Jandreau refused to quit riding and training wild horses — even it if meant risking his life. He plays a version of himself in director Chloe Zhao's slightly fictionalized retelling of his story. The director and star talk about the accident, recovery and making of 'The Rider.' Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Female Persuasion' by Meg Wolitzer. Todd Purdum's new book, 'Something Wonderful,' is about the creative partnership and strained personal relationship of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. Together they created such hit shows as 'Oklahoma!,' 'Carousel,' 'South Pacific' and 'The Sound of Music.'

  • Jon Bon Jovi
    Fri, Apr 13, 2018


    The rock icon and his band are being inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame this week. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2009 about his upbringing (his mom was a Playboy bunny, his dad was a hairdresser), getting his first single on the radio, and having group therapy with his bandmates. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'You Were Never Really Here.'

  • America's Eviction Crisis
    Thu, Apr 12, 2018


    Sociologist Matthew Desmond estimates that about 2.3 million evictions were filed in the U.S. in 2016 — a rate of four every minute. "Eviction isn't just a condition of poverty; it's a cause of poverty," he says. Desmond won a Pulitzer Prize for his 2016 book 'Evicted,' and now has launched the first-ever national database of evictions called The Eviction Lab. Also, Ken Tucker reviews John Prine's first new album in 13 years, 'The Tree of Forgiveness.'

  • 'Can Democracy Survive Global Capitalism?'
    Wed, Apr 11, 2018


    Author Robert Kuttner talks about the escalating trade dispute between the U.S. and China and the possible consequences. Kuttner also discusses the connection he sees between global capitalism and the rise of the far right in Europe and the U.S.Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Female Persuasion' by Meg Wolitzer, and jazz critic Kevin Whitehead remembers late pianist and composer Cecil Taylor.

  • A Wounded Cowboy Gets Back On The Horse In 'The Rider'
    Tue, Apr 10, 2018


    Following a rodeo accident, Brady Jandreau refused to quit riding and training wild horses — even it if meant risking his life. He plays a version of himself in director Chloe Zhao's slightly fictionalized retelling of his story. The director and star talk about the accident, recovery and making of 'The Rider.' Film critic Justin Chang reviews the film as well.

  • How Rodgers & Hammerstein Revolutionized Broadway
    Mon, Apr 09, 2018


    Todd Purdum's new book, 'Something Wonderful,' is about the creative partnership and strained personal relationship behind such hit shows as 'Oklahoma!,' 'Carousel,' 'South Pacific' and 'The Sound of Music.'

  • Best Of: Eels / Actor Dan Stevens
    Fri, Apr 06, 2018


    Four years ago, Eels founder Mark Oliver Everett decided to take a break from music. He went on what he calls a project of self-improvement, during which he got married, got divorced and, at the age of 54, had a son. He also spent time reckoning with the losses he'd experienced earlier in life, including his sister's suicide, his mother's death from cancer and his father's fatal heart attack. Now he's back, with a new album, 'The Deconstruction,' a reflection on both the pain and joy of life. Also, John Powers marks the 50th anniversary of the Stanley Kubrick film, '2001: A Space Odyssey.' And Dan Stevens, who played Matthew Crawley on 'Downton Abbey,' now stars in 'Legion,' an FX drama that's a spin-off of the Marvel Comics 'X-Men' series. Stevens talks about Crawley's untimely death, and wearing a motion capture suit in the live action 'Beauty and the Beast.'

  • Uncovering The Forgotten Osage Murders
    Fri, Apr 06, 2018


    Members of the Osage Indian Nation became very wealthy in the 1920s after oil deposits were found on their land. Then local whites began targeting the tribe, killing them off one by one in mysterious and disturbing ways. Journalist David Grann tells the story in his book 'The Killers of the Flower Moon.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews HBO's 'Paterno' and BBC America's 'Killing Eve.'

  • 'Legion' Actor Dan Stevens
    Thu, Apr 05, 2018


    Stevens, who played Matthew Crawley on 'Downton Abbey,' now stars in 'Legion,' an FX drama that's a spin-off of the Marvel Comics 'X-Men' series. Stevens talks about Crawley's untimely death, and wearing a motion capture suit in the live action 'Beauty and the Beast.' Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews an album from pianist Martial Solal, and film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Blockers.'

  • Mark Oliver Everett (Eels)
    Wed, Apr 04, 2018


    Four years ago, Eels founder Mark Oliver Everett decided to take a break from music. He went on what he calls a project of self-improvement, during which he got married, got divorced and, at the age of 54, had a son. He also spent time reckoning with the losses he'd experienced earlier in life, including his sister's suicide, his mother's death from cancer and his father's fatal heart attack. Now he's back, with a new album, 'The Deconstruction,' a reflection on both the pain and joy of life.

  • Madeleine Albright
    Tue, Apr 03, 2018


    The former secretary of state describes President Trump as "the most anti-democratic leader that I have studied in American history." Albright's new book is 'Fascism: A Warning.'Also, critic at large John Powers marks the 50th anniversary of the Stanley Kubrick film, '2001: A Space Odyssey.'

  • The 'Original Siamese Twins' / Remembering TV Producer Steven Bochco
    Mon, Apr 02, 2018


    Steven Bochco, who died Sunday, created numerous series, including 'Hill Street Blues' and 'NYPD Blue.' TV Critic David Bianculli looks back on Bochco's impact, then we listen to his 1989 'Fresh Air' interview. Yunte Huang's new book, 'Inseparable,' chronicles the lives of the "original Siamese twins," Chang and Eng Bunker, who were brought to America in 1829 and forced to perform in a freak show. They later married and fathered 21 children.

  • Best Of: Comic Roy Wood Jr. / Growing Up Undocumented
    Fri, Mar 30, 2018


    Roy Wood Jr. says the years he spent performing in comedy clubs in the South and Midwest — sometimes in places where he felt unsafe as a black man — helped him understand the psyche of the country. He grew up the son of a civil rights journalist in Birmingham, Ala., and joined 'The Daily Show' in 2015, after working for ESPN and as a radio personality. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Ready Player One.' And writer Sara Saedi was 2 when her parents fled Iran and moved to California. Her new memoir, 'Americanized,' describes her 18-year-long path to citizenship, and the lingering anxiety of being undocumented.

  • Bill Hader / Former Obama White House Staffer
    Fri, Mar 30, 2018


    Comic actor Bill Hader spoke with Terry Gross in 2012 about his recurring 'SNL' character Stefon, doing voices and his love of classic Hollywood films. His latest project is the HBO series 'Barry.' Also, former Obama White House staffer Alyssa Mastromonaco reflects on her six years running on adrenaline working for the president. Her memoir 'Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?' is now out in paperback. And film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Ready Player One.'

  • A New Thread In The Mueller Investigation
    Thu, Mar 29, 2018


    'New York Times' reporter David Kirkpatrick explains the connection between the Mueller investigation and efforts by the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia to influence U.S. international policy.

  • Growing Up Undocumented
    Wed, Mar 28, 2018


    Sara Saedi was two when her parents fled Iran and moved to California. Her new memoir, 'Americanized,' describes her 18-year-long path to citizenship, and the lingering anxiety of being undocumented. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Miles Davis & John Coltrane: The Final Tour,'recordings of the last engagements Coltrane played as a sideman with Davis.

  • How 'Bad Medicine' Dismisses & Misdiagnoses Women
    Tue, Mar 27, 2018


    Journalist Maya Dusenbery argues that medicine has a "systemic and unconscious bias" against women that's rooted in "what doctors, regardless of their own gender, are learning in medical schools." Her new book is 'Doing Harm.' Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Battleship Yamato' by Jan Morris, and then we'll listen back to an excerpt of Morris' 1989 interview with Terry Gross. Finally, we remember musician Buell Neidlinger, who died March 16.

  • How Corporations Had A 'Hidden' Civil Rights Movement
    Mon, Mar 26, 2018


    UCLA Law professor Adam Winkler says that in the past 200 years, American businesses have gone to court claiming constitutional rights that were originally intended for people. His new book is 'We the Corporations.' Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Tracey Thorn's 'Record,' and David Bianculli reviews the reboot of the TV series 'Roseanne.'

  • Best Of: Danny Trejo / The Evolution Of A.I.
    Fri, Mar 23, 2018


    Trejo's made a career playing menacing tough guys, from 'Sons of Anarchy' to 'Machete.' He says that his experience standing in the yard waiting for a prison riot in San Quentin prepared him for acting: "You're absolutely scared to death ... [but] you have to pretend you're not." Critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two books about cold cases. In recent years, artificial intelligence technology has evolved at a rapid pace. Computers can now mimic human language and drive cars. 'New York Times' technology reporter Cade Metz discusses how computers can learn on their own, what their limitations are, and the dangers of them making mistakes.

  • Singer-Songwriter Margo Price
    Fri, Mar 23, 2018


    Nashville musician Margo Price pawned her wedding ring — and her husband sold their car — to pay for the recording studio to make her 2016 debut album, 'Midwest Farmer's Daughter.' In 2017 she released her second album, 'All American Made,' an overtly political and feminist record that grapples with the current political climate. Price plays some of her songs in-studio, and does a bit of Kendrick Lamar's 'HUMBLE.'David Edelstein reviews Wes Anderson's 'Isle of Dogs.'

  • How The Trump Organization Mixes Business & Politics In India
    Thu, Mar 22, 2018


    Journalist Anjali Kamat spent a year investigating Trump's business deals in India. Her report is in the 'New Republic' and on the WNYC podcast, 'Trump Inc.', which is co-hosted by Andrea Bernstein. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews Judd Apatow's two-part HBO documentary about comic Garry Shandling, 'The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling.'

  • 'Daily Show' Correspondent Roy Wood Jr.
    Wed, Mar 21, 2018


    Wood says the years he spent performing in comedy clubs in the South and Midwest — sometimes in places where he felt unsafe as a black man — helped him understand the psyche of the country. He grew up the son of a civil rights journliast in Birmingham, Ala., and joined 'The Daily Show' in 2015, after working for ESPN and as a radio personality.

  • 'The Triumph Of Christianity'
    Tue, Mar 20, 2018


    Religion scholar Bart Ehrman says that the early spread of Christianity transformed the entire history of the West — for better or worse. His new book examines how the once forbidden religion swept the world.

  • 'Being Jewish In America In The Age of Trump'
    Mon, Mar 19, 2018


    Trump "has made nationalist policy into the policy of the executive branch," says 'New York Times' editor Jonathan Weisman. His new book, '(((Semitism))),' details how he became the target of neo-Nazi trolls and the connection between white nationalism and Donald Trump's campaign and presidency. Also, classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews a collection of recordings celebrating the New York Philharmonic's 175th birthday.

  • Best Of: Writers Luis Alberto Urrea & Tim Kreider
    Fri, Mar 16, 2018


    Luis Alberto Urrea's 'The House of Broken Angels' borrows from the story of his older brother, who died of cancer. Urrea talks about being the son of a Mexican father and an American mother, feeling like there was a border wall in his own home growing up. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a box set of recordings of pianist Teddy Wilson. Writer and cartoonist Tim Kreider admits unabashedly that the longest relationship of his adult life was with the stray cat that became his companion for 19 years. His new collection of personal essays details his many unconventional relationships, which include the girlfriend he traveled with on a circus train, a married woman he fell in love with and his whirlwind romance with a sexual performance artist.

  • How Words Get Added To The Dictionary
    Fri, Mar 16, 2018


    In 2017 binge-watch, humblebrag, photobomb, NSFW, truther, face-palm and listicle were among the new additions to the dictionary. The words must meet three criteria, says Merriam-Webster lexicographer Kory Stamper: widespread use, sustained use and meaningful use. Stamper's book is 'Word by Word.'Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the album 'The Old Guys' by Amy Rigby.

  • The Evolution Of Artificial Intelligence
    Thu, Mar 15, 2018


    Over the past five years, artificial intelligence technology has evolved at a rapid pace. Computers can now mimic human language and drive cars. 'New York Times' technology reporter Cade Metz discusses how computers can learn on their own, what their limitations are, and the dangers of them making mistakes. Critic Milo Miles reviews two recent collaborations by the Kronos Quartet.

  • Actor Danny Trejo
    Wed, Mar 14, 2018


    Trejo's made a career playing menacing tough guys, from 'Breaking Bad' to 'Machete.' He says that his experience standing in the yard waiting for a prison riot in San Quentin prepared him for acting: "You're absolutely scared to death ... [but] you have to pretend you're not." Also, we'll hear an excerpt of Terry Gross' 1993 interview with writer and former inmate Eddie Bunker, who was a mentor to Trejo. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'The Death of Stalin.'

  • Connecting The Dots Between Trump And Russia
    Tue, Mar 13, 2018


    Journalists Michael Isikoff and David Corn have been at the forefront of the investigation of the Trump campaign's ties to Russia. Their new book, 'Russian Roulette,' attempts to put all the pieces of the story together. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two books about cold cases.

  • 'Life, Loss, And Hope In Wartime Syria'
    Mon, Mar 12, 2018


    Rania Abouzeid has been covering Syria since 2011 — despite the fact that she's been called a spy, placed on wanted lists by Syrian intelligence and banned from entering the country. In her new book, 'No Turning Back,' she writes about rebel fighters, and families caught in the middle. Critic John Powers reviews 'The Sparsholt Affair,' by novelist Alan Hollinghurst.

  • Best Of: John Oliver / LGBTQ Activist Sarah McBride
    Fri, Mar 09, 2018


    On his HBO series 'Last Week Tonight,' host John Oliver dives into often obscure stories, like NRA TV and the laws that govern televangelism. Oliver talks about how the show comes together, and his experience as an immigrant in America. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'A Wrinkle in Time.' Sarah McBride became the first trans person to speak at a major party's convention when she spoke at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Now she's the spokesperson for the Human Rights Campaign. Her new memoir is 'Tomorrow Will Be Different: Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality.'

  • Writer Mohsin Hamid: 'Stories Are A Living Thing'
    Fri, Mar 09, 2018


    Hamid's novel, 'Exit West,' is about knowing when it's time to flee your country, and what happens when you migrate to a nation that's hostile to immigrants. Hamid was born in Lahore, Pakistan, but has lived in New York and London. He talks about feeling like an outsider, and the power of language. He spoke with Terry Gross last year. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new CD-set recording of Charles Mingus, and film critic Justin Chang reviews 'A Wrinkle in Time.'

  • Remembering Comic Barry Crimmins
    Thu, Mar 08, 2018


    Crimmins, who died last week, mentored Bobcat Goldthwait when they were up-and-coming comics in the '80s. The two men spoke with Terry Gross in 2015 about their documentary 'Call Me Lucky,' which details Crimmins' career, traumatic childhood and subsequent work advocating for survivors of sexual abuse. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the second season of 'Jessica Jones' on Netflix.

  • 'Last Week Tonight' Host John Oliver
    Wed, Mar 07, 2018


    On 'Last Week Tonight,' Oliver dives into often obscure stories, like NRA TV and the laws that govern televangelism. He describes the show's style as "the slowest improv you've ever seen."

  • The Infamous Trump-Russia Dossier
    Tue, Mar 06, 2018


    'New Yorker' staff writer Jane Mayer tells the story of ex-spy Christopher Steele, the man behind the unverified dossier detailing Trump's ties with Russia. We'll talk about how the dossier was compiled, and why so little was done about its findings during the campaign — even after Steele told the FBI. Steele also wrote a memo after the election about the possibility that Russians blocked Trump's first choice for Secretary of State, Mitt Romney.

  • Mexican-American Writer Finds Inspiration In Family, Tragedy & Trump
    Mon, Mar 05, 2018


    Luis Alberto Urrea's 'The House of Broken Angels' borrows from the story of his older brother, who died of cancer. He says the book went through a dramatic rewrite after Trump became president.

  • Best Of: Nick Kroll & John Mulaney / 'Shape Of Water' Fish Man
    Fri, Mar 02, 2018


    Comedians Nick Kroll and John Mulaney channel the indignities of puberty in their animated Netflix comedy series 'Big Mouth.' Looking back on his own adolescence, Mulaney says: "I was always mystified." They're hosting the Independent Spirit Awards March 3. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews two new compilations of Nina Simone's early singles, and Doug Jones, who is a frequent collaborator of Guillermo del Toro's, tells 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger about playing the fish man in the Oscar-nominated film 'The Shape of Water.'

  • Paul Thomas Anderson / Remembering Sex Columnist Cynthia Heimel
    Fri, Mar 02, 2018


    Set in 1950s London, Anderson's new film, 'Phantom Thread,' stars Daniel Day-Lewis as a renowned and obsessive fashion designer. The director says he was inspired by fashion icons like Christian Dior and Cristobal Balenciaga. 'Phantom Thread' has six Oscar nominations, including Best Picture. Also, we remember sex and relationship columnist Cynthia Heimel, who died on Sunday. She was known for the humorous advice she doled out in columns for 'The Village Voice' and 'Playboy.' She spoke with Terry Gross in 1991.

  • Nick Kroll & John Mulaney On 'Big Mouth'
    Thu, Mar 01, 2018


    The comics channel the indignities of puberty in their animated Netflix comedy series 'Big Mouth.' Looking back on his own adolescence, Mulaney says: "I was always mystified." The duo are hosting the Independent Spirit Awards this Saturday. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Red Sparrow' starring Jennifer Lawrence.

  • LGBTQ Activist Sarah McBride
    Wed, Feb 28, 2018


    When she spoke at the 2016 Democratic National Convention, Sarah McBride became the first trans person to speak at a major party's convention. Now she's the spokesperson for the Human Rights Campaign, an LGBTQ organization. Her new memoir is 'Tomorrow Will Be Different: Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality.' Also, critic John Powers reviews the new season of Donald Glover's FX series 'Atlanta.'

  • Long-Term Effects Of Psychotropic Drugs Are 'Cloaked In Mystery'
    Tue, Feb 27, 2018


    Psychologist and journalist Lauren Slater, who suffers from depression and bipolar disorder, has first-hand experience with psychotropic drugs; she's been taking medication for 35 years. "As a nation, we're consuming them; we're gobbling them down," Slater tells Terry Gross. "And we don't really know what we're taking into our bodies." Her new book, in part about the science and history of mood-altering drugs, is titled 'Blue Dreams.' Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews two new compilations of Nina Simone's early singles.

  • 'I Wrote This Book Because I Love You'
    Mon, Feb 26, 2018


    Writer and cartoonist Tim Kreider admits unabashedly that the longest relationship of his adult life was with the stray cat that became his companion for 19 years. His new collection of personal essays details his many unconventional relationships, which include the girlfriend he traveled with on a circus train, a married woman he fell in love with and his whirlwind romance with a sexual performance artist. "One of the few conclusions I may have reached from writing this book is that when we say 'relationship' or 'marriage' we all think we're talking about the same thing," Kreider says. "But I think there are a lot of different deals out there." And Maureen Corrigan reviews the debut memoir by Matt Young, a combat veteran of the Iraq War, titled 'Eat the Apple.'

  • Best Of: From A Survivalist Childhood To Cambridge / Actor Richard Jenkins
    Fri, Feb 23, 2018


    Growing up, Tara Westover had no birth certificate, never saw a doctor and didn't go to school. She writes about her trying transition into the mainstream in 'Educated: A Memoir.' Also, critic David Bianculli reviews BBC's nature documentary series 'Blue Planet II,' which he calls a "dazzling piece of television." And Richard Jenkins wasn't cast in a movie until he was in his 30s. Now 70, he's up for an Oscar for best supporting actor for his role in 'The Shape of Water.'

  • The Making Of Pixar's 'Coco'
    Fri, Feb 23, 2018


    Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina spent six years creating their Oscar-nominated animated film about the Day of the Dead. The movie is about how the dead remain alive in our hearts as long as we keep them in our memories and tell their stories. And critic David Bianculli reviews the BBC nature documentary series 'Blue Planet II,' which he calls a "dazzling piece of television."

  • Russia's Troll Factory
    Thu, Feb 22, 2018


    New York Times reporter Scott Shane discusses special counsel Robert Mueller's indictment of 13 Russians who allegedly participated in a complex social media operation to undermine the 2016 election. And critic Ken Tucker reviews Brandi Carlile's new album 'By the Way, I Forgive You.'

  • 'Shape of Water' Actor Richard Jenkins
    Wed, Feb 21, 2018


    Jenkins is nominated for an Oscar for his performance in Guillermo del Toro's latest film, which is about a mute woman who falls in love with a sea creature. The actor started his career on the stage, and didn't get a movie role until he was in his 30s. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a box set of recordings of pianist Teddy Wilson with his various groups from the 1930s and '40s. And Justin Chang reviews the indie film 'Golden Exits.'

  • More Details

    • LearnOutLoud.com Product ID: N022361